How Dr. Seuss and Read Across America day intersect

Success of Seuss

Saturday, March 2, 2019 would have been the 115th birthday of Theodor Geisel also known as Dr. Seuss. By 2015, Dr. Seuss’ books had been translated into 17 languages and had sold 650 million copies in 95 countries.

dr. seuss tribute

Above illustration by Kurt Snibbe, Staff

Theodor Geisel was a student at Dartmouth in 1925. He was caught by the dean with gin during Prohibition. In order to continue working at the school’s humor magazine, he adopted a pen name that used his mother’s maiden name, “Seuss.”

Dr. Seuss went on to become an editorial cartoonist during World War II, a film maker, legendary children’s book author and illustrator.

The National Education Association’s Read Across America honors Dr. Seuss’ birthday each year. Since Dr. Seuss’ birthday is on a Saturday this year, the NEA is having Read Across America on Friday, March 1, 2019.

The Read Across America site has information on how to inspire kids to pick up a book and become lifelong readers.

Here is a chronology of Seuss books

list of seuss books

Seuss Museum

If you’re in the mood to travel to Springfield Massachusetts and a Dr. Suess fan, there’s a museum and sculpture park worth seeing. The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum is devoted to Springfield native Theodor Geisel.

If you’d like to buy some Dr. Seuss artwork The Art of Dr. Seuss gallery in Chicago might be the place to start looking. The gallery is dedicated to selling paintings and prints by the artist.

Sources: Seussinspringfield.org, UCSD Library, Random House, Box Office Mojo, Publishers Weekly, The Washington Post and NEA

Charles Apple helped compile this report

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Must-reads from Janet Fitch, David Frum and others

  • Best-selling author of “White Oleander,” Janet Fitch delivers an impressive coming-of-age saga with her fourth novel, “The Revolution of Marina M.” In this impeccably researched epic, a young poet in 1916 is drawn into left-wing politics during the Bolshevik revolution and experiences a sexual awakening in the midst of upheaval.

    Best-selling author of “White Oleander,” Janet Fitch delivers an impressive coming-of-age saga with her fourth novel, “The Revolution of Marina M.” In this impeccably researched epic, a young poet in 1916 is drawn into left-wing politics during the Bolshevik revolution and experiences a sexual awakening in the midst of upheaval.

  • Abortions are outlawed in the alternate reality of Leni Zumas’ second novel “Red Clocks,” which braids the stories of five women who each attempt to buck the patriarchy in a different way, a timely narrative that is one part allegory, one part “The Handmaid’s Tale,” and thoroughly thought-provoking. There is only one new book that Sherman Alexie has recommended with 100 percent of his soul, and it is the debut memoir “Heart Berries,” by Terese Marie Mailhot. Slim, soulful and poetic musings on her struggles with bipolar disorder and PTSD, with thoughtful meditations on what it means to be a contemporary Native American woman and a writer.

    Abortions are outlawed in the alternate reality of Leni Zumas’ second novel “Red Clocks,” which braids the stories of five women who each attempt to buck the patriarchy in a different way, a timely narrative that is one part allegory, one part “The Handmaid’s Tale,” and thoroughly thought-provoking. There is only one new book that Sherman Alexie has recommended with 100 percent of his soul, and it is the debut memoir “Heart Berries,” by Terese Marie Mailhot. Slim, soulful and poetic musings on her struggles with bipolar disorder and PTSD, with thoughtful meditations on what it means to be a contemporary Native American woman and a writer.

  • There is only one new book that Sherman Alexie has recommended with 100 percent of his soul, and it is the debut memoir “Heart Berries,” by Terese Marie Mailhot. Slim, soulful and poetic musings on her struggles with bipolar disorder and PTSD, with thoughtful meditations on what it means to be a contemporary Native American woman and a writer.

    There is only one new book that Sherman Alexie has recommended with 100 percent of his soul, and it is the debut memoir “Heart Berries,” by Terese Marie Mailhot. Slim, soulful and poetic musings on her struggles with bipolar disorder and PTSD, with thoughtful meditations on what it means to be a contemporary Native American woman and a writer.

  • A former border patrol agent grapples with the human costs of capturing and deporting undocumented migrants in “The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border,” a debut memoir by former Fulbright scholar and 2017 Whiting Award winner, Francisco Cantú.

    A former border patrol agent grapples with the human costs of capturing and deporting undocumented migrants in “The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border,” a debut memoir by former Fulbright scholar and 2017 Whiting Award winner, Francisco Cantú.

  • Debut novelist Jamie Quatro explores Christian faith and desire with lyrical precision in “Fire Sermon,” a deeply affecting story of commitment, infidelity and longing from an exciting new voice. Fresh, intellectual takes on timeless literary themes revealed in an inventive structure.

    Debut novelist Jamie Quatro explores Christian faith and desire with lyrical precision in “Fire Sermon,” a deeply affecting story of commitment, infidelity and longing from an exciting new voice. Fresh, intellectual takes on timeless literary themes revealed in an inventive structure.

  • Conservative commentator and former Bush speechwriter David Frum composes a compelling analysis of the lesser-known ways in which the current administration is undermining the traditions of the executive branch, and democracy itself, in “Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic,” a critical take on Republican acquiescence from a longtime party insider.

    Conservative commentator and former Bush speechwriter David Frum composes a compelling analysis of the lesser-known ways in which the current administration is undermining the traditions of the executive branch, and democracy itself, in “Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic,” a critical take on Republican acquiescence from a longtime party insider.

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Must-reads from Deanne Stillman, Martin J. Smith, Gayle Brandeis and others

  • Veteran journalist and novelist Martin J. Smith dives into the weirdness of the West with his wry essay collection “Mr. Las Vegas Has a Bad Knee: And Other Tales of the People, Places, and Peculiarities of the Modern American Southwest.” Many pieces began as articles for the Orange County Register.

    Veteran journalist and novelist Martin J. Smith dives into the weirdness of the West with his wry essay collection “Mr. Las Vegas Has a Bad Knee: And Other Tales of the People, Places, and Peculiarities of the Modern American Southwest.” Many pieces began as articles for the Orange County Register.

  • Best-selling Turkish author Elif Shafak takes readers to modern-day Istanbul for her third novel, “Three Daughters of Eve.” A woman harks back to her college days for an intellectual exploration of divinity and the relationship between feminism and Islam.

    Best-selling Turkish author Elif Shafak takes readers to modern-day Istanbul for her third novel, “Three Daughters of Eve.” A woman harks back to her college days for an intellectual exploration of divinity and the relationship between feminism and Islam.

  • One of the greatest hard-boiled detectives of all time is due for resurrection thanks to “The Big Book of the Continental Op,” a posthumous collection of short stories and novels by the godfather of crime writing, Dashiell Hammett. The stories appear together for the first time, thanks to the editing of Hammett’s granddaughter, an Orange County native and literary scholar, Julie M. Rivett, and biographer Richard Layman.

    One of the greatest hard-boiled detectives of all time is due for resurrection thanks to “The Big Book of the Continental Op,” a posthumous collection of short stories and novels by the godfather of crime writing, Dashiell Hammett. The stories appear together for the first time, thanks to the editing of Hammett’s granddaughter, an Orange County native and literary scholar, Julie M. Rivett, and biographer Richard Layman.

  • In the wake of her mother’s death, which coincided with the birth of her first child, poet Gayle Brandeis searches for solace with “The Art of Misdiagnosis: Surviving My Mother’s Suicide,” an inventive memoir that contemplates her mother’s mental health issues and her obsession with two rare illnesses.

    In the wake of her mother’s death, which coincided with the birth of her first child, poet Gayle Brandeis searches for solace with “The Art of Misdiagnosis: Surviving My Mother’s Suicide,” an inventive memoir that contemplates her mother’s mental health issues and her obsession with two rare illnesses.

  • Critically acclaimed narrative nonfiction author Deanne Stillman ventures back out into the desert for “Blood Brothers: The Story of the Strange Friendship Between Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill.” From their Wild West show collaboration to Little Big Horn, Stillman captures historic details and weaves them into a compelling narrative that reads like a novel.

    Critically acclaimed narrative nonfiction author Deanne Stillman ventures back out into the desert for “Blood Brothers: The Story of the Strange Friendship Between Sitting Bull and Buffalo Bill.” From their Wild West show collaboration to Little Big Horn, Stillman captures historic details and weaves them into a compelling narrative that reads like a novel.

  • Just in time for your New Year’s resolution, neuroscientist Rachel Herz examines the physiological and psychological factors that plague the hungry brain in “Why You Eat What You Eat: The Science Behind Our Relationship With Food.” Yum.

    Just in time for your New Year’s resolution, neuroscientist Rachel Herz examines the physiological and psychological factors that plague the hungry brain in “Why You Eat What You Eat: The Science Behind Our Relationship With Food.” Yum.

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Book events for the week of Nov. 5

Author and journalist David Clary will discuss and sign his new book, "Gangsters to Governors: The New Bosses of Gambling in America," at Laguna Beach Books. (Photo Courtesy of David Clary)
Author and journalist David Clary will discuss and sign his new book, “Gangsters to Governors: The New Bosses of Gambling in America,” at Laguna Beach Books. (Photo Courtesy of David Clary)

Sunday, Nov. 5

Author and journalist David Clary will discuss and sign his new book, “Gangsters to Governors: The New Bosses of Gambling in America,” which explores how and why states seized control of gambling from organized crime. 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 5. Laguna Beach Books, 1200 S. Coast Hwy., Laguna Beach. 949-494-4779 or lagunabeachbooks.com

Join the conversation: Sign up to be part of the Register Book Club on Facebook and connect with other local book lovers.

Do you have a local book event you’d like to share? Are you an author with Orange County ties and a new book? Email bookclub@ocregister.com. For events, please submit information at least two weeks in advance.

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Book events for the week of Oct. 8

  • Join local author Paul Freeman, as he discusses his new book, “Stop, Go, Murder.” (Photo Courtesy of Laguna Beach Books)

    Join local author Paul Freeman, as he discusses his new book, “Stop, Go, Murder.” (Photo Courtesy of Laguna Beach Books)

  • Join bestselling author Josh Sabarra for a discussion and signing of his new book “Enemies Closer.” (Photo Courtesy of Josh Sabarra)

    Join bestselling author Josh Sabarra for a discussion and signing of his new book “Enemies Closer.” (Photo Courtesy of Josh Sabarra)

  • Join bestselling author Josh Sabarra for a discussion and signing of his new book “Enemies Closer.” (Photo Courtesy of Josh Sabarra)

    Join bestselling author Josh Sabarra for a discussion and signing of his new book “Enemies Closer.” (Photo Courtesy of Josh Sabarra)

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Sunday, Oct. 8

Join local author Paul Freeman, as he discusses his new book, “Stop, Go, Murder.” The story revolves around a struggling ex-gangster, who learns his former boss has been murdered. He then hatches a blackmail scheme, targeting possible suspects. Laguna Beach Books. 4 p.m. 1200 S. Coast Hwy., Suite 105, Laguna Beach. 949-494-4779 or lagunabeachbooks.com

Wednesday, Oct. 11

Join bestselling author Josh Sabarra for a discussion and signing of his new book “Enemies Closer”. The story focuses on a movie studio publicist named Marcee Brookes, who feels ordinary. She’s stuck in a mid-level job, struggles to accept her size-16 figure and dreams of a man who might look past her waistline and into her heart. 7 p.m. Barnes and Noble. 7881 Edinger Ave. #110, Huntington Beach. 714-897-8781 or barnesandnoble.com

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T. Jefferson Parker, Jennifer Egan top new must-reads

 

  • Seven years after nabbing a Pulitzer for “A Visit from the Goon Squad,” novelist Jennifer Egan leaves experimental fiction behind to journey to World War II-era New York City with “Manhattan Beach,” an emotional story of a young woman working in a naval yard, who confronts a mobster to find the truth behind her father’s disappearance.

    Seven years after nabbing a Pulitzer for “A Visit from the Goon Squad,” novelist Jennifer Egan leaves experimental fiction behind to journey to World War II-era New York City with “Manhattan Beach,” an emotional story of a young woman working in a naval yard, who confronts a mobster to find the truth behind her father’s disappearance.

  • In “We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy,” National Book Award winner Ta-Nehisi Coates reignites a fire that’s been smoldering since 2015, when his second book, “Between the World and Me,” became an instant classic. It’s a poignant mix of memoir and social commentary, with a focus on race relations during the Obama era.

    In “We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy,” National Book Award winner Ta-Nehisi Coates reignites a fire that’s been smoldering since 2015, when his second book, “Between the World and Me,” became an instant classic. It’s a poignant mix of memoir and social commentary, with a focus on race relations during the Obama era.

  • Southern California native and New York Times best-selling crime novelist T. Jefferson Parker kicks off a new series with “The Room of White Fire.” A private investigator tracks down an Iraqi War vet who has escaped from a mental hospital but suspects a larger military cover-up may be at play.

    Southern California native and New York Times best-selling crime novelist T. Jefferson Parker kicks off a new series with “The Room of White Fire.” A private investigator tracks down an Iraqi War vet who has escaped from a mental hospital but suspects a larger military cover-up may be at play.

  • For poet Alice Anderson, Hurricane Katrina was just the first tragedy in a series of events that unraveled her life, all of which are captured in her stunning memoir “Some Bright Morning, I’ll Fly Away,” a redemptive narrative about surviving an abusive relationship and forging a new life in the wake of upheaval.

    For poet Alice Anderson, Hurricane Katrina was just the first tragedy in a series of events that unraveled her life, all of which are captured in her stunning memoir “Some Bright Morning, I’ll Fly Away,” a redemptive narrative about surviving an abusive relationship and forging a new life in the wake of upheaval.

  • Differing views on consumerism, conformity and parenthood come into focus in “Little Fires Everywhere,” a novel by New York Times’ best-selling author Celeste Ng. When an artist and her daughter move to an affluent suburb of Ohio in the late ’90s, the natives get restless.

    Differing views on consumerism, conformity and parenthood come into focus in “Little Fires Everywhere,” a novel by New York Times’ best-selling author Celeste Ng. When an artist and her daughter move to an affluent suburb of Ohio in the late ’90s, the natives get restless.

  • Former “Daily Show” correspondent John Hodgman takes a break from absurdist comedy to get personal in his memoir “Vacationland: True Stories from Painful Beaches,” a hilarious adaptation of his one-man show, about coming to terms with the uncoolness of middle age, vacationing in Maine and mortality in general.

    Former “Daily Show” correspondent John Hodgman takes a break from absurdist comedy to get personal in his memoir “Vacationland: True Stories from Painful Beaches,” a hilarious adaptation of his one-man show, about coming to terms with the uncoolness of middle age, vacationing in Maine and mortality in general.

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