Corona del Mar boys volleyball ends 30-game winning streak for rival Newport Harbor

NEWPORT BEACH – The Newport Harbor boys volleyball team, ranked No. 1 in the state, came into its Surf League contest against rival Corona del Mar on Wednesday with an unblemished record.

In fact, the Sailors went into contest having lost just one set in seven league matches.

The Sea Kings ended Newport Harbor’s run of dominance with a four-set upset victory, 25-18, 21-25, 25-15, 25-23, at Corona del Mar High School.

The Sea Kings (19-7, 3-1) snapped Newport Harbor’s 30-game winning streak, and moved into a first-place tie with the Sailors (30-1, 3-1) with two league matches remaining. It was the first regular-season loss in two seasons for Newport Harbor, which swept the Sailors in the teams’ first league matchup on March 29.

Huge win for boys volleyball tonight over Newport Harbor. @ocvarsity @OCSportsZone @DailyPilotSport @SoCalSidelines pic.twitter.com/X9jhSra7NL

— CDM ATHLETICS (@CDM_ATHLETICS) April 18, 2019

“The first time we played them, we really didn’t put them under pressure,” first-year Sea Kings coach Sam Stafford said. “And we talked about it the first two days of our practice … Let’s just see how they react under pressure. We were able to do that and we were able to make some plays when we got them under pressure.”

Corona del Mar, which has not lost a home match since 2016, also ended the Sailors’ unbeaten streak for the second year in a row. The Sailors were 33-0 last season when the Sea Kings defeated them in the CIF-SS Division 1 final. Corona del Mar went on to defeat Newport Harbor again in the CIF Southern California Regional Final.

Nick Alacano and Adam Flood led the Sea Kings with 11 kills and eight kills, respectively.

Jack Higgs had 18 kills and Dayne Chalmers had 14 kills for Newport Harbor.

“Everyone was trying so hard,” Flood said. “And everyone knows everyone on the other side, so you try that much harder to try and beat guys you know. It was just so much fun playing in that atmosphere.”

The Sea Kings never trailed in the first set.

The score was 12-12 when Corona del Mar went on a 6-0 run, which wound up being too much for the Sailors to overcome.

The Sea Kings were ahead 14-9 in the second set when the Sailors went on a 7-2 run to tie the score. With Higgs serving, the Sailors went on a 6-0 run to pull away and tie the score of the match.

Corona del Mar dominated the third set, setting up a closely fought fourth set that featured seven ties and several long volleys.

The Sea Kings never led until Bryce Dvorak’s kill put them ahead 24-23.

Corona del Mar scored the winning point on a net violation by Newport Harbor.

“We had good practices,” Newport Harbor coach Rocky Ciarelli said. “We were ready to play. We just didn’t play well. They played a good match and they beat us.”

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Will undocumented immigrants avoid new state health benefits?

By Virginia Gaglianone and Yesenia Amaro, The USC Center for Health Journalism Collaborative

More than anything else, Claudia Navarro wanted health insurance for her children when she arrived in the United States.

Navarro’s daughter has spina bifida — a congenital condition her doctors in Mexico said would kill the girl within a year. But Navarro didn’t give up on her baby. Instead, she brought her two young children to the U.S. to seek medical help. She obtained limited Medi-Cal benefits for her child, despite her immigration status, and arranged treatments that kept her daughter alive.

Now, 27 years later, Navarro worries that her decision to seek benefits could threaten her chances at becoming a legal U.S. resident.

She’s focused on proposed federal restrictions that would place new limits on who can qualify for a green card. The rule change would broaden who the immigration system defines as a “public charge” — essentially a taxpayer burden — and includes an expanded list of federal taxpayer-funded public benefits that would count against immigrants, including food stamps and Medi-Cal, the state’s health program for low-income individuals and families. Under the new rules, which are still under review, immigrants also could be denied a green card if they are deemed likely to depend on federal benefits in the future, even if they haven’t applied for them yet.

Such rules cannot be implemented retroactively and legal challenges to an expanded rule are all but assured, experts say, but immigrants such as Navarro still fear that the prior use of benefits could increase the chances that federal officials will deny immigration petitions. Some immigrants also are being advised to drop all their benefits by attorneys and notarios, who are under-the-table legal advisers who may not be familiar with the law.

Across the country, worries over the proposed rule have already prompted some undocumented immigrants to drop out of public programs or to stop going to the local clinic when they are sick, say doctors, immigration attorneys and advocates.

In California, such fears could also stop millions from signing up for free health care for low-income families under proposals by Gov. Gavin Newsom and state legislators to expand Medi-Cal eligibility for undocumented individuals.

“The concerns over public charge are legitimate because the federal immigration policies have been focused on enforcement and sown fear and mistrust among immigrant families, whether they are undocumented, permanent residents or naturalized citizens,” said Jesus Martinez, executive director of the Central Valley Immigrant Integration Collaborative service agency.

Navarro, 51, said the Trump administration’s proposed rule change has introduced new uncertainty into her family’s already precarious life here.

“Since we arrived, it’s been an ordeal trying to find doctors and hospitals, a real agony,” said Navarro, whose children are on Medi-Cal.

Although Navarro does not regret asking for coverage for her children, she admits worrying about her immigration status. One source of relief: Her children have won temporary protection from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or “Dreamers,” program, granted to children who were brought to the U.S. illegally.

“Right now, everything regarding my status is in limbo,” the Los Angeles resident said. “We live in great anguish and uncertainty, praying that Dreamers and their parents are granted residency status.”

Who is a taxpayer burden or ‘public charge’?

It’s established law to deny green cards to immigrants based on whether a person could eventually become a public charge. But until now, that rule was limited to those receiving long-term care provided by institutions, such as mental health centers or nursing homes, or cash-assistance programs for people who have physical or mental disabilities.

In September 2018, the Department of Homeland Security proposed expanding the definition of “public charge” to include social assistance programs such as Medicaid, food stamps offered under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and Medicare Part D’s Low Income Subsidy for prescription drugs. Use of food stamp and housing programs under Section 8 could also hurt residency applicants.

Expanding the definition of who represents a burden on society makes sense, argues Andrew Arthur, a Washington, D.C.-based fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies, which supports reducing U.S. immigration. The proposed rule changes are needed because “the law has never really been implemented the way it was written,” he said.

Arthur added that “generous benefits” promised by state lawmakers would raise other questions, such as whether people with pre-existing conditions would enter the country or move to California from other states so they can receive medical coverage.

People in need of medical care could get a visa to come and get that care, he said. But it could also encourage other people to enter California illegally “and put a burden to the taxpayers.”

“It’s a bad public policy,” Arthur said.

The new governor’s health care plan

Newsom’s plan would expand Medi-Cal to every Californian under age 26, regardless of immigration status, provided they meet low-income criteria. Assemblyman Joaquin Arambula and state Sen. Maria Elena Durazo have introduced legislation that would expand Medi-Cal even further, to all low-income, undocumented adults. The state currently provides Medi-Cal to undocumented children.

Daniel Zingale, director of the governor’s Office of Strategic Communications and Public Engagement, said the state will spend millions of dollars to educate immigrant communities about the Medi-Cal expansion if the governor’s initiative goes through. It’s hard to underestimate the potential chilling effect of the Trump administration’s proposal to redefine who represents a “public charge” and the fears spurred by other federal immigration crackdowns, he said.

“We can’t be timid about it, we can’t hesitate in our outreach to try to … bring people into these appropriate services without putting them at some draconian risk,” Zingale said. “The messenger will really matter.”

Who would be affected by the new rule?

The public charge proposal was open to comments during a 60-day period, which ended on Dec. 10, 2018. The Department of Homeland Security is now analyzing more than  216,000 comments before approving or modifying the proposal.

An estimated 382,264 people — many of them applying for permanent residency — are expected to be targeted annually under the proposed rule change, according to Homeland Security.

In a statement, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services spokesman Michael Bars said the agency “looks forward to addressing these public comments in the final rule this year.”

While the policy is debated, many of the 1.5 million uninsured and undocumented immigrants in California are forced to weigh the benefits and potential risks of using public services.

“Ana,” who asked to keep her real name confidential, has been waiting for 30 years for the opportunity to become a U.S. resident, since arriving in Los Angeles from Durango, Mexico. But now she’s worried about the services and government aid, such as Supplemental Security Income, that she sought for her older son.

“I’m afraid they will deny me for having asked for care for my children,” said Ana, about the application she’s filed to adjust her immigration status. “I sometimes think it would have been better not to have asked for any help.”

The Uncovered California project results from an innovative reporting venture – the USC Center for Health Journalism News Collaborative – which involves print and broadcast outlets across California, all reporting together on the state’s uninsured. Outlets include newspapers from the McClatchy Corp., Gannett Co., Southern California News Group, and La Opinion, as well as broadcasters at Univision and Capital Public Radio.

Share your storyAre you uninsured? Do you struggle to pay for health insurance? The Southern California News Group is working with a collaborative of journalists statewide to report on whether people can get and keep health insurance in California. Click here to tell us about yourself.

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Laguna Beach police cars will keep American flag logo despite some objection

  • A Laguna Beach black and white police car sports a new American Flag police graphic in Laguna Beach, CA on Monday, April 15, 2019. Laguna’s police cars where all white, the police department added the logo when they went to the black and white cars. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A woman, who declined to give her name, sings “The Star-Spangled Banner” during public comments at the Laguna Beach City Council meeting in Laguna Beach on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Sound
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  • An overflow crowd listens from outside the Laguna Beach City Council chambers where the City Council listened to public comment, mostly in support for the new flag display on the Laguna Beach Police cars, in Laguna Beach on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Mayor Bob Whalen speaks to the crowd during the Laguna Beach City Council meeting where the City Council listened to public comment, mostly in support for the new flag display on the Laguna Beach Police cars, in Laguna Beach on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • An overflow crowd listens from outside the Laguna Beach City Council chambers where the City Council listened to public comment, mostly in support for the new flag display on the Laguna Beach Police cars, in Laguna Beach on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • People attending the Laguna Beach City Council meeting show their support for the new flag display on the Laguna Beach Police cars before public comments to the City Council in Laguna Beach on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Police Chief Laura Farinella and Captain Jeff Calvert listen to Matt Lawson as he speaks during the Laguna Beach City Council meeting in Laguna Beach on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Lisa Collins waves a flag during the Laguna Beach City Council meeting where the City Council listened to public comment, mostly in support for the new flag display on the Laguna Beach Police cars, in Laguna Beach on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A star-spangled Matt Lawson speaks during the Laguna Beach City Council meeting where the City Council listened to public comment, mostly in support for the new flag display on the Laguna Beach Police cars, in Laguna Beach on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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LAGUNA BEACH — After a new patriotic red, white and blue logo on Laguna Beach police vehicles became a topic of national debate, this week, the Laguna Beach City Council on Tuesday, April 16, ruled that the graphic will remain in place.

“This has made us more unified than anything I’ve ever seen in this town,” said Mayor Pro Tem Steve Dicterow, who was one of four council members who voted in support of the design.

Councilwoman Toni Iseman was the lone dissenter, suggesting the “I” in “Police” be changed from red to blue.

“I like how it looks,” Dicterow told an overflowing council chamber. “I got 600 emails from people in Laguna, the ratio of support was 100 percent in support of the design. I got emails from across the country. The flag is a symbol, it doesn’t represent a particular president or political belief. It’s a symbol of what we strive for. What better symbol than one that protects our freedom?”

In a second motion, the City Council voted unanimously to change the motto that accompanies the logo from “Proudly serving our community” to “Serving our community with pride and integrity.”

The debate over the logo gained steam over the weekend following media reports that the issue had divided the community. But the concern generally was less about patriotism than about what the colors represent.

To some, the bold design that showed up on police units was considered too dramatic and “aggressive.”

Complaints about the logo surfaced in early March when the police department began rolling out its new black-and-white vehicles with the new logo.

The Laguna Beach City Council in February unanimously approved a return to the traditional black-and-white cars after the police department requested the switch, saying the solid white SUVs were often confused with local security cars, especially by visiting tourists.

With the new black-and-white police cars, the police department also wanted a new look and logo. The council reviewed six logo selections and settled on two options.

The City Council then asked Laguna Beach Police Chief Laura Farinella for her and the department’s preference. Farinella and Cpl. Ryan Hotchkiss, president of the Laguna Beach Police Employees Association, preferred the American flag look over a proposed beach design.

There was some confusion over which design was actually selected. But the police department and city officials said the American flag was chosen — albeit a muted version of the current logo.

When the original designs were applied to the cars, the muted colors did not stand out. At that point the police department opted for the bolder colors.

On Tuesday, Laguna Beach police kept order in City Council chambers where at least 300 gathered. People stood five or six deep in the back and others gathered on the outdoor patio.

More than 50 people spoke, with just a few in favor of removing the American flag graphics. One woman sang the Star Spangled Banner when it was her turn to speak and most of the audience, along with Councilman Peter Blake, stood up and joined her.

“I think this is a teachable moment for this town,” said Amber Offield. “We can come together as citizens and make the right decision for our police officers and firefighters.”

Annemarie McIntosh, 17, was one of the later speakers. She told the council she had been watching the meeting online and felt she needed to represent her age group.

She pointed out that the Girl Scout uniform she was wearing had a flag and told the council she was in favor of the American flag design on the cars.

“It’s more recognizable and easier for kids to spot on the street,” she said.

Resident Chris Prelitz was among the minority who opposed the current logo. He told the council that others who felt the same were afraid to attend the meeting.

“I’m disappointed in the two council members who went onto Fox News and changed the narrative,” he said. “I’m here for the 20 to 30 people who were too afraid to be here.”

Councilman Peter Blake, whom Prelitz accused of dividing the community, responded.

“People who aren’t here tonight aren’t afraid, they simply lost,” he said. “They didn’t want to face the shame of sending out all those (negative) emails. For this first time, we’ve had a chance to stand up. Thank you for putting us in the position to love our flag. When I thought I would lose my flag, I said, no way!”

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Girls swimming: Foothill Swim Games produce 12 O.C. leading times

GIRLS SWIMMING/DIVING

Top times through April 15, 2019

Please send updates, corrections to Dan Albano at dalbano@scng.com or @ocvarsityguy on Twitter

200 medley relay (O.C. record 1:40.77) — SM 1:43.88 FSG, Foot 1:46.06, Wood 1:46.27, Tes 1:46.31, Los Al 1:50.32, FV 1:50.42, Nor 1:51.38, Beck 1:51.43, Irv 1:51.50, MD 1:51.92

200 free (O.C. record 1:43.01) — Pearson (Foot) 1:46.78 FSG, Ella Ristic (SM) 1:47.01, Degn (SM) 1:50.06, Watson (MD) 1:51.68, Losey (Tes) 1:51.74, Ribeiro (Tes) 1:53.94,

200 IM (O.C. record 1:53.90) — Crom (Tes) 2:03.44 FSG, Phetbenjakul (Tes) 2:05.92, Anderson (Wood) 2:06.51, Hsieh (Nor) 2:06.65, Woolfenden (SM) 2:07.64, Abrajan (SM) 2:07.95, Oien (SM) 2:08.27, Watson (MD) 2:08.40, Nugent (SM) 2:08.62, Lee (Tes) 2:08.71

50 free (O.C. record 22.53) — Davidson (YL) 23.51 FSG, Ervin (SM) 23.51 FSG, Delgado (SM) 23.58, Mills (Tes) 23.74, Losey (Tes) 23.96r, P. Yeh (Wood) 24.10, DeLuca (Foot) 24.10, Odgers (SM) 24.16, Olson (MD) 24.18, E. Ristic (SM) 24.47r

100 butterfly (O.C. record 51.53) — J. Yeh (Wood 55.21 FSG, Crom (Tes) 55.47, Delgado (SM) 55.60, Abrajan (SM) 55.68, Renner (SM) 55.96, Phetbenjakul (Tes) 55.98, M. Ristic (SM) 56.05, P. Yeh (Wood) 56.24, Ross (Irv) 56.28, Mykkanen (Foot) 56.33,

100 free (O.C. record 48.69) —  Pearson (Foot) 50.12 FSG, Ella Ristic (SM) 50.46, Degn (SM) 51.23r, A. Spitz (NH) 51.36, Losey (Tes) 51.41, Hsieh (Nor) 51.78, Phetbenjakul (Tes) 52.63r, Ervin (SM) 52.67, Odgers (SM) 52.75, McKendry (AN) 52.86, J. Yeh (Woofd) 52.86r

500 free (O.C. record 4:37.30) — Degn (SM) 4:49.39 FSG, Crom (Tes) 4:50.10, Su (MD) 4:55.16, Losey (Tes) 4:59.12, Ribeiro (Tes) 5:03.15, Oien (SM) 5:03.90, Shead (LosAl) 5:06.62, Lee (Tes) 5:08.03

200 free relay (O.C. record 1:31.47) –– SM 1:34.26 FSG, Tes 1:37.82, Irv 1:39.66, Wood 1:40.03, Nor 1:40.12, Los Al 1:40.31, MD 1:40.38, Beck 1:42.10, JS 1:42.59, Uni 1:42.60

100 back (O.C. record 51.85) — J. Yeh (Wood) 55.50 FSG, Pearson (Foot) 55.53, Duncan (Irv) 56.15, Yanagawa (Beck)  57.20, Abrajan (SM) 57.30, Mykkanen (Foot) 57.37, M. Ristic (SM) 57.38, Watson (MD) 58.40, Harris (HB) 58.60,

100 breast (O.C. record 1:00.33) — Nugent (SM) 1:03.13 FSG, Phetbenjakul (Tes) 1:03.15, Mills (Tes) 1:03.23, Davidson (YL) 1:03.27 FSG, Woolfenden (SM) 1:04.01, Farrow (FV) 1:05.18, Renner (SM) 1:05.32, Eng (LaHi) 1:05.59, Witting (Wood) 1:05.68, A. Spitz (NH) 1:06.08

400 free relay (O.C. record 3:18.26) — SM 3:42.76 FSG, Tes 3:27.17, MD 3:32.48, Foot 3:34.37, Los Al 3:37.72, Irv 3:38.85, Wood 3:39.54, NH 3:41.09, LB 3:43.18, FV 3:43.43

Diving — Stocker (ET) 548.05, Earley (AN) 541.20, Hopkins (CV) 535.15, Montague (CV) 534.65, Haigh (SM) 501.15

Legend

FSG = Foothill Swim Games

r = relay leadoff

Please send updates, corrections to Dan Albano at dalbano@scng.com or @ocvarsityguy on Twitter

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Coachella 2019: Ariana Grande slays weekend 1 of Coachella complete with an ‘NSYNC reunion

If “God is a Woman”, then the official god of Sunday’s weekend 1 of Coachella Arts and Music Festival is Ariana Grande.

Due to a delay, fans waited longer than expected for Grande to hit the stage, but it was worth the wait for those catching the live streams and fans at the festival.

Grande pulled out all the stops which included costumes that doubled as couture, an ‘NYSNC reunion, a Nicki Minaj and Diddy appearance, and a string orchestra.

Below is a roller coaster of emotions that started from the delay until the last song, in tweet form.It wasn’t just the fans having a meltdown for Arichella, even mama Grande was counting down:

#Arichella about to go down!!!!

— Joan Grande (@joangrande) April 15, 2019

When a delay prevented people from seeing Grande’s set both in Indio and the live streams, fans had this to say:

Waiting for Ariana Grande to come on stage at Coachella. H.E.R didn’t finish her masterpiece yet.

— Naama Yemini❤ (@naamayemini05) April 15, 2019

they’ve been saying “Ariana Grande next” for the last 30 minutes but i see everything but not her

— ricky (@ricardodrtmelo) April 15, 2019

But this teaser was worth it:

Tune in now https://t.co/kRjOZ0KCue @coachella @ArianaGrande pic.twitter.com/fc1tOLyayb

— *NSYNC (@NSYNC) April 15, 2019

You know you’re a true fan when:

HI GUYS, I’VE NEEN INSIDE THE CROWD CLOSE TO THE BARRICADE FOR THE PAST 5 HOURS FOR ARICHELLA!!

✨Francis Dominic✨ (@frncissdominc) April 15, 2019

But once Grande started, Twitter went wild:

IT’S HAPPENING…… #ARICHELLA pic.twitter.com/s4deCGdiee

— dillen 43 (@arianassuperior) April 15, 2019

So Ariana Grande did NOT allow our professional photographers to capture her #Coachella set. When this happens, I have Terrible Stick Figure drawings like a courtroom artist, terrible because I can’t draw. Here’s the first from #Arichella pic.twitter.com/OmTOSfB6NN

— Vanessa Franko (@vanessafranko) April 15, 2019

#ARICHELLA BABY KILLED GOD IS A WOMAN AND IM LIVING FOR IT. pic.twitter.com/41UmiRBMwE

— ʟʏss ♡ (@umgrvnde) April 15, 2019

When ‘NYSNC (minus Justin Timberlake) came out to sing “Tearin’ Up With My Heart”:

SHE BEOUGHT NSYNC BACK TO LIFE GOD REALLY IS A WOMAN AND HER NAME IS @ArianaGrande #ARICHELLA

— 𝙢𝙖𝙧𝙞𝙖𝙣𝙖 (@hermosohs) April 15, 2019

https://twitter.com/amblingpanda/status/1117669837147267072

When @NSYNC got on stage for @ArianaGrande pic.twitter.com/wxR01NFdm4

— 𝐬. (@stayupwithsarah) April 15, 2019

When Nicki Minaj showed up, tweets in all caps came out:

NICKI & ARIANA A DREAM TEAM #ARICHELLA

— dom (@uncutissuperior) April 15, 2019

I LOVE THEIR FRIENDSHIP @ArianaGrande @NICKIMINAJ #ARICHELLA WOMEN SUPPORTING WOMEN

— where no one knows my name (@leavemefnlonely) April 15, 2019

Oh, and there was this special surprise:

OK #AriChella with the @Diddy, Mase, and Biggie tribute. ✊🏾@ArianaGrande

🤴🏾 (@TheGreatOne___) April 15, 2019

A taste of some of her visuals:

#ARICHELLA pic.twitter.com/i6dI7kWlOa

— ShyRazzy21 (@Raeshaw78842618) April 15, 2019

These outfits on top of the talent are just unreal😩😍@ArianaGrande you’re so cool ily #Coachella

— Danielle (@deetornatore) April 15, 2019

 

And of course, Grande had to say “Thank u, next”, that is until weekend 2 of Coachella.

ENDING THE NIGHT WITH A NUMBER ONE SONG, LEGEND #ARICHELLA

— brenna | may 14th (@breakupwitchagf) April 15, 2019

 

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