Shooting at Russian university leaves 6 dead, 28 hurt

By JIM HEINTZ

MOSCOW (AP) — A student opened fire Monday at a university in Russia, leaving six people dead and 28 hurt before being shot by police and detained, officials said. Other students and staff locked themselves in rooms during the attack and video on Russian news sites showed some students jumping out of second-story windows.

Beyond saying that he was a student, Russian authorities offered no further information on his identity or a possible motive.

In some footage, a black-clad helmeted figure could be seen striding on a sidewalk at Perm State University, cradling a long-barreled weapon. Russia’s Investigative Committee, the country’s top body for criminal probes, said the gunman fired a smoothbore hunting weapon. That could indicate he used a shotgun.

The university, which has 12,000 students, said about 3,000 people were on campus at the time. The school is in Perm, a city of 1 million residents located 1,100 kilometers (700 miles) east of Moscow.

The Investigative Committee said six people were killed, revising down its earlier figure of eight dead. No explanation was given for the change. It said 28 people were injured and some of them were hospitalized. The Health Ministry said 19 of them were shot; it was not clear how the others were injured.

In a video released by the Interior Ministry, a witness whose name was not given said he saw the man outside after shooting two people and that he appeared to be wearing a bulletproof vest.

A traffic police unit was the first to reach the scene and the suspect opened fire on them, according to the Interior Ministry. He was wounded when police returned fire and then was disarmed. The gunman also had a knife, the ministry said.

One traffic officer said people rushed out of the university building as gunshots were heard.

“I entered the building and saw an armed young man walking down the stairs. I shouted at him ‘Drop it!’” That’s when he pointed the gun at me and fired. At that point I used my gun,” officer Konstantin Kalinin said in the ministry video.

“I feel shock, disdain and anger,” university student Olga Kechatova said later at a makeshift memorial outside the university. “People who study with me at the university suffered and died for nothing.”

Although firearms laws are strict in Russia, many people obtain permits for hunting. News reports cited officials as saying the suspect had a permit for a pump-action shotgun, although it was not clear if that was for the weapon used.

School shootings are infrequent in Russia, but the Perm attack was the third such shooting in recent years. In May, a gunman opened fire at a school in the city of Kazan, killing seven students and two teachers with a registered weapon. A student at a college in Russia-annexed Crimea killed 20 students and himself in 2018.

After the Kazan shooting, President Vladimir Putin called on the national guard to tighten gun regulations. Russia then passed a law raising the minimum gun purchase age from 18 to 21.

The Russian leader offered his condolences on Monday.

“It is a tremendous tragedy, not only for the families who lost their children but for the entire country,” Putin said.

Read more about Shooting at Russian university leaves 6 dead, 28 hurt This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

California needs an alternative to the GOP

The outcome of the recall election was Gavin Newsom 64%, Donald Trump 36%.

A similar result can be expected next year as well. Donald Trump will be the Democrats’ opponent in every race in the state, from governor to United States senator to the California Legislature — and, as a result, the Democratic Party will keep its monopoly position over all statewide offices in California and its two-thirds control of both houses of the Legislature.

This is not healthy for California — especially for Democrats. The voices of reform within that party will be silenced by the decibels of anti-Trump noise.

Many California Democrats worry that their children have to move out of state to afford a home or to find a job whose pay can keep up with state taxes and cost of living.

Many Democrats are grateful for Prop. 13 so that the taxes on their homes don’t skyrocket, jeopardizing their retirement in California.

Many Democrats want the public schools to focus on fundamentals that will train their children for quality careers, rather than a curriculum that checks off the boxes in a politically correct agenda.

Many Democrats want to be judged by the content of their character, not the color of their skin, in admission to state colleges or getting a job in state or local government.

Many Democrats want California’s roads fixed quickly, efficiently and permanently — whether or not by a union construction firm.

Many Democrats want the money we approved for water bonds to be used to build water storage as was promised.

Many Democrats see California’s windfall budget surplus squandered in one-time transfer payments to favored groups instead of replenishing the rainy-day fund to cushion the next economic downturn.

Many Democrats doubt they get the highest value for paying the highest taxes in the country.

Many Democrats care about the homeless living in unsanitary conditions along San Francisco’s Market Street and Los Angeles’ underpasses — and they care, as well, for the small businesses and law-abiding citizens whose daily life and work takes them by those encampments.

Many Democrats are concerned about the crime that causes neighborhood convenience stores to close up, raises worry about the security of their homes and causes them to look out on the street when a car alarm starts to sound.

California has been judged the most hostile of all 50 states (and even the District of Columbia!) by leaders of companies who decide where to expand and to hire people, in poll after poll over the last 20 years. Democrats care deeply about that. Without a healthy business environment, there is a shortage of good paying jobs, union and non-union.

All of these concerns will be submerged next year, as they were during the recall election.

The winning formula for the majority party, in California politics, is to ignore all of these issues because Donald Trump is such a perfect opponent. Unchallenged, the elites who run the Democratic Party will replicate the decisions they’ve made that have led us to our deep discontent. They have no reason to change because they’re winning.

As for the California Republican Party, its label is irretrievably tarnished. Elected leaders have cowered before the threat of losing in a primary. These timid souls deserve the characterization hurled at them: clones of President Trump. Against their better judgment, they have been silent or complicit in policies that have ballooned deficits, stifled international trade and withdrawn from alliances — positions that would have shocked Barry Goldwater or Ronald Reagan. The role of constructive critic has given way to uncivil, name-calling firebrand.

Grievance politics has taken over the Republican Party. Identity politics has taken over the Democratic Party. Californians need a new party, a party “for the rest of us,” the Common Sense Party. Our membership includes twice as many former Democrats as former Republicans. All who care more about solving problems than demonizing opponents are welcome to join.

Tom Campbell is a professor of law and of economics at Chapman University. He was a congressman, California state senator and finance director of California. He left the Republican Party in 2016 upon its nomination of Donald Trump. He is in the process of forming a new political party in California, the Common Sense Party.

Read more about California needs an alternative to the GOP This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

SCOTUS has wrongly usurped the state legislative process on key issues

A couple of years after the end of World War II, a U.S. Supreme Court justice expressed concern that the court was picking and choosing which parts of the Bill of Rights would be binding on state governments and which would not.

“Some are in and some are out, but we are left in the dark as to which are in and which are out. Nor are we given the calculus for determining which go in and which stay out,” wrote Justice Felix Frankfurter. “If the basis of selection is merely that those provisions of the first eight Amendments are incorporated which commend themselves to individual justices as indispensable to the dignity and happiness of a free man, we are thrown back to a merely subjective test.”

That was 1947, in a concurring opinion in the case of Adamson v. California. Adamson was appealing his murder conviction and death sentence, arguing that his Fifth Amendment right to remain silent had been violated at his trial, because state law allowed the prosecutor and judge to tell the jury that his refusal to testify might indicate guilt. By a vote of 5-4, the justices ruled against him.

“It is settled law that the clause of the Fifth Amendment, protecting a person against being compelled to be a witness against himself, is not made effective by the Fourteenth Amendment as a protection against state action,” the majority opinion declared.

At the time, it actually was settled law that the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution could be completely violated by state laws, except for the exceptions carved out by the Supreme Court. That’s what prompted Justice Frankfurter’s concern that the court’s rulings risked becoming “merely subjective.”

And here we are. In the past week or so, three U.S. Supreme Court justices have expressed concerns about the public perception that they are partisan politicians in black robes. Justice Amy Coney Barrett told an audience at the University of Louisville McConnell Center that media reports do not accurately depict “the court’s reasoning” as the basis for decisions, instead portraying the justices as “acting in a partisan manner.”

Justice Clarence Thomas, speaking at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, said the justices do not make decisions based on “personal preferences.” He, too, complained about the media, saying the characterization of the justices as being “like a politician” is a problem that is “going to jeopardize any faith in the legal institutions.”

Justice Stephen Breyer recently voiced similar sentiments. In an interview while on a book tour, he sought to push back against the view that the justices are “junior league” politicians.

The comments appear to be something of a campaign against proposals to increase the number of justices on the Supreme Court, as a presidential commission studies the issue. Justice Thomas warned that “we should be really, really careful” before “destroying our institutions.”

But it’s the “merely subjective test” problem identified by Justice Frankfurter in 1947 that has put the institution at risk of destruction. A close look at American legal history reveals that the U.S. Supreme Court has spent nearly the last 100 years selectively “incorporating” parts of the federal Bill of Rights into the Fourteenth Amendment, which bars any state from denying liberty to any person. This process began in the 1920s, long after the Civil War. As recently as 1900, in the case of Maxwell v. Dow, the Supreme Court said the first ten amendments to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, “were not intended to and did not have any effect upon the powers of the respective states.” That decision was not an outlier. “This has been many times decided,” the court pointed out.

Over the decades, the justices invented subjective balancing tests with names like “strict scrutiny” and “intermediate scrutiny” to determine when and how far a state law may infringe a particular provision of the Bill of Rights. The final effect of these decisions is to place the justices in the position of creating policy.

Whatever the merits of the policies so created, this process has had an extremely distorting effect on our politics. For example, confirmation hearings for federal judges are politically contentious because they are now the last chance for Americans to have any say at all about what the law will be on many issues that once were decided by elected, accountable state representatives.

Abortion is one of those issues. In 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court decided the case of Roe v. Wade and sharply limited state power to restrict abortion. There is no constitutional amendment protecting the right to privacy, which was interpreted into existence by the Supreme Court in the 1965 case of Griswold v. Connecticut. Anything that’s interpreted into the Constitution can be interpreted out again.

That may happen. On September 1, by a vote of 5-4, the Supreme Court said it could not order a temporary halt to a Texas law that bans abortion after approximately six weeks of pregnancy. The decision was portrayed by the president, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and nearly all media coverage as the certain death of Roe v. Wade.

When news of that September 1 ruling broke, people were voting by mail in California. It may have been a significant factor in energizing Democratic voters to turn out and defeat the recall.

Because the Supreme Court has usurped the state legislative process on so many controversial and important matters, politicians have had a free pass to go to the extreme edge of issues without worrying about building a coalition to pass legislation. This is great for fundraising and television appearances. It is also the untold story behind the deep partisan division in our country today.

Write Susan Shelley: Susan@SusanShelley.com and follow her on Twitter: @Susan_Shelley.

Read more about SCOTUS has wrongly usurped the state legislative process on key issues This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

Emmys 2021: ‘The Crown’ takes 7 awards including best drama, while ‘Ted Lasso’ scores 4 including best comedy

“The Crown” conquered the 73rd Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday with seven wins including outstanding drama and all four acting categories, while “Ted Lasso” finished second with four Emmys including outstanding comedy.

More: See all the 2021 Emmy Awards action

“Thank you, the Television Academy; thank you, Netflix; thank you, Sony,” said creator Peter Morgan, who appeared virtually with most of “The Crown” cast and creators in England where it was just after 4 a.m. Monday when the best drama award was announced.

“Thanks … this lot,” said Morgan, who earlier won best writing for a drama, smiling broadly at the cheering crew around him in the room. “We’re going to have a party now. I’m lost for words and I’m very, very grateful.”

Olivia Colman won best actress for “The Crown” for her role as Queen Elizabeth, while Josh O’Connor won best actor for his work as Prince Charles. Earlier, Tobias Menzies and Gillian Anderson won the supporting actor and actress awards for portrayals of Prince Phillip and Margaret Thatcher.


In this video grab issued Sunday, Sept. 19, 2021, by the Television Academy, the team of “Ted Lasso” accept the award for outstanding comedy series during the Primetime Emmy Awards. (Television Academy via AP)

In comedy, Jason Sudeikis won best actor for “Ted Lasso,” which ended up with four Emmys, including best supporting actor and actress for Brett Goldstein and Hannah Waddingham, while Jean Smart was the winner of best actress for a comedy series for her work in “Hacks.”

“Mare of Easttown” and “The Queen’s Gambit” split the top categories for limited series, anthologies or movies. Kate Winslet won best actress in the title role of “Mare of Easttown,” which won three overall, while “The Queen’s Gambit” won two awards including outstanding limited series.

“Anya Taylor-Joy, what can I say, you brought the sexy back to chess,” said William Horberg, producer of “The Queen’s Gambit.” “And you inspired a generation of young  women and girls to realize the patriarchy has no defense against our queens.”

.

Read more about Emmys 2021: ‘The Crown’ takes 7 awards including best drama, while ‘Ted Lasso’ scores 4 including best comedy This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

No. 13 UCLA unable to complete comeback against Fresno State

  • Wide receiver Ty Jones #8 of the Fresno State Bulldogs drops a pass in the end zone against the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Ty Jones #8 of the Fresno State Bulldogs drops a pass in the end zone against the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson #1 of the UCLA Bruins makes his way onto the field prior to a NCAA Football game against the Fresno State Bulldogs at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Zach Charbonnet #24 celebrates as he jumps into the arms of teammate offensive lineman Paul Grattan #65 of the UCLA Bruins after running for touchdown against the Fresno State Bulldogs in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Ty Jones #8 of the Fresno State Bulldogs drops a pass in the end zone against the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • UCLA Bruins makes his way onto the field prior to a NCAA Football game against the Fresno State Bulldogs at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • UCLA Bruins fans wait for their team to enter the field prior to a NCAA Football game against the Fresno State Bulldogs at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson #1 of the UCLA Bruins makes his way onto the field prior to a NCAA Football game against the Fresno State Bulldogs at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Brittain Brown #28 of the UCLA Bruins is tackled by defensive end Arron Mosby #3 of the Fresno State Bulldogs for a loss of yards in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Kazmeir Allen #19 of the UCLA Bruins runs a Fresno State Bulldogs kick back for yardage in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Ty Jones #8 of the Fresno State Bulldogs cache a pass for first down over defensive back Qwuantrezz Knight #24 and teammate defensive back Cameron Johnson #3 of the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Head coach Chip Kelly of the UCLA Bruins looks on against the Fresno State Bulldogs in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Ronnie Rivers #20 of the Fresno State Bulldogs runs for first down against the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Defensive back Quentin Lake #37 of the UCLA Bruins jumps on a fumble by wide receiver Jalen Cropper #5 of the Fresno State Bulldogs that was ruled down after a replay in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Jake Haener #9 of the Fresno State Bulldogs passes over linebacker Kain Medrano #20 of the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Defensive back Quentin Lake #37 of the UCLA Bruins jumps on a fumble by wide receiver Jalen Cropper #5 of the Fresno State Bulldogs that was ruled down after a replay in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Tight end Mike Martinez #88 of the UCLA Bruins catches a pass for first down against defensive back Evan Williams #32 of the Fresno State Bulldogs in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Ty Jones #8 of the Fresno State Bulldogs cache a pass for first down over defensive back Qwuantrezz Knight #24 and teammate defensive back Cameron Johnson #3 of the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Ethan Fernea #36 of the UCLA Bruins leaps over defensive back Evan Williams #32 of the Fresno State Bulldogs for the first down in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Ronnie Rivers #20 of the Fresno State Bulldogs runs for a first down against the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Ty Jones #8 of the Fresno State Bulldogs cache a pass for first down over defensive back Qwuantrezz Knight #24 and teammate defensive back Cameron Johnson #3 of the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Jake Haener #9 of the Fresno State Bulldogs scrambles for the first down against the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Ethan Fernea #36 of the UCLA Bruins leaps over defensive back Evan Williams #32 of the Fresno State Bulldogs for the first down in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson #1 of the UCLA Bruins dives for yardage against defensive end Arron Mosby #3 of the Fresno State Bulldogs in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Keric Wheatfall #1 of the Fresno State Bulldogs catches a pass for fairest down against the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Zach Charbonnet #24 of the UCLA Bruins runs for as touchdown against the Fresno State Bulldogs in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Jalen Cropper #5 of the Fresno State Bulldogs dives for the touchdown against the UCLA Bruins in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Zach Charbonnet #24 of the UCLA Bruins runs for as touchdown against the Fresno State Bulldogs in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Ethan Fernea #36 of the UCLA Bruins leaps over defensive back Evan Williams #32 of the Fresno State Bulldogs for the first down in the first half of a NCAA Football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • offensive lineman Justin Williams #69 of the UCLA Bruins shoes prior to a NCAA Football game against the Fresno State Bulldogs at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson #1 of the UCLA prior to a NCAA Football game against the Fresno State Bulldogs at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Head coach Chip Kelly of the UCLA Bruins prior to a NCAA Football game against the Fresno State Bulldogs at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson #1 of the UCLA plays air guitar prior to a NCAA Football game against the Fresno State Bulldogs at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson #1 of the UCLA Bruins makes his way onto the field prior to a NCAA Football game against the Fresno State Bulldogs at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson #1 of the UCLA Bruins makes his way onto the field prior to a NCAA Football game against the Fresno State Bulldogs at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on Saturday, September 18, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • UCLA linebacker Mitchell Agude (45) celebrates the team’s win over LSU in an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 4, 2021, in Pasadena, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

of

Expand

PASADENA — Quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson and No. 13 UCLA couldn’t overcome their first half struggles in a 40-37 loss to Fresno State Saturday night in the Rose Bowl.

The Bruins, who came off a bye week, didn’t earn any style points with AP Top 25 voters in their first showing as a ranked team and were unable to complete a second half rally in suffering their first loss in three games.

Thompson-Robinson kept the offense moving with a pair of long touchdown passes to receivers Kam Brown (39 yards) and Kyle Philips (42 yards). He finished with 278 passing yards and three touchdowns. He was also UCLA’s leading rusher with 75 yards on 13 carries.

The offense struggled in the first half as Thompson-Robinson completed just 2 of 5 pass attempts. Running backs Zach Charbonnet, Ethan Fernea and Brittain Brown combined for 23 rushing yards as the Bruins trailed 23-10 at the half.

Charbonnet would finish the night with 19 rushing yards and two touchdowns on six carries.

Running back Ronnie Rivers led the Bulldogs’ offense with 137 yards and two touchdowns on 21 carries. Fresno State quarterback Jake Haener passed for 455 yards and two touchdowns.

For UCLA, defensive lineman Otito Ogbonnia, defensive back Quentin Lake and tight end Mike Martinez all suffered injuries and did not return.

Read more about No. 13 UCLA unable to complete comeback against Fresno State This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

When a real estate deal stumbles, what fixes can be made?

Last week I reviewed the steps in buying commercial real estate. Whether you’re buying to house your company’s operation or simply to enjoy the rent a parcel produces, the steps are essentially the same.

The possible exception could be the financing portion, which some investors abandon in favor of deploying large sums of cash into the buy.

Today, I will complete the orbit and describe some deal challenges that can occur and some suggestions on how to overcome them.

From last week:

Due diligence, also referred to as a contingency period, ranges from as few as 15 days to as long as 90, and a ton of work must occur during this time frame. Financing must be secured, title exceptions approved, inspection of the building – roof, electrical, HVAC, etc. accomplished, vesting documents drawn, financial aspects of the tenancy – if any – analyzed, and environmental health diagnosed.

Whew! Within each of the main categories of approval, there are checkpoints which guide toward the end. Financing, for example, involves credit of the buyer, the tenant, an appraisal, an enviro report and lender concurrence. There’s a lot to be done in a short time. What if something isn’t approved?

That, dear readers, is a subject for today’s column.

So, here it goes.

Generally, purchase and sale agreements include a mechanism for solving issues that arise in a deal.

The most widely used contract is published by the Association of Commercial Real Estate, or AIR. Clearly defined within paragraph nine are the various categories of approval items — inspection, title, tenancy, other agreements, environmental, material change, governmental approvals and financing. Within the boiler plate language are roadmaps for resolution.

If your contract is not the standard AIR form, results may differ. As always, it’s wise to seek legal counsel before engaging. But within the document, typically there are three choices – cancel, accept or fix. A fourth can creep in, which is a buyer-seller compromise.

Indulge me as we walk through some quick examples.

Let’s say a building inspector discovers the HVAC units are past their useful life. From experience, I can say this scenario is quite common. So, here’s what happens.

The buyer objects to the condition of the cooling systems by disapproving a portion of the physical inspection contingency. You may be wondering, wait, I thought the buyer was buying the building “as-is, where-is, with no seller warranties.” She is, but she’s also relying on her inspection to alert her to any fixes necessary. Confusing? Yes, it is.

Sure, a seller may simply refuse to repair or replace the units and cancel the escrow, but they cannot do so immediately. You see, here’s where the “mechanism” takes place. The buyer objects; the seller has 10 days to respond — yes, no or maybe. A no vote on the recall – ooops, sorry. Wrong issue. If the seller refuses, the buyer can cancel the deal within another 10 days, opt to continue and buy with the faulty units, or accept a compromise — the “maybe” offered by the seller.

Financing is trickier.

You see, if the buyer is unsuccessful in their pursuit of a loan by the date specified, generally, the seller can walk away. Therefore, it’s imperative to be quite transparent with the seller during the loan approval process. Because prior to the financing condition date, there may be some leverage.

If an appraisal comes back less than the contract price – which causes a lender to renege on the amount – it’s recommended to level with the seller.

Yes, you or the seller can cancel, additional dollars can be added to adjust for the delta – accept, an appeal can be made to the lender – buyer fix, purchase price can be reduced – seller fix, or a compromise between buyer and seller can be struck whereby buyer adds some dough, seller reduces the price – and voila!

I’ve witnessed these go every way you can imagine over my decades in the business. One certainty – there will always be issues. It’s a thing.

The next deal I close without one will be the first. But, fair warning. In today’s overheated industrial market, I’d not plan on a seller being terribly receptive to what’s referred to as a “re-trade.” Chances are there is a line of suitors waiting for the chosen buyer to blink.

Allen C. Buchanan, SIOR, is a principal with Lee & Associates Commercial Real Estate Services in Orange. He can be reached at abuchanan@lee-associates.com or 714.564.7104.

Powered by WPeMatico

Records broken as Orange football defeats Capistrano Valley in 67-47 shootout

MISSION VIEJO — Multiple school records were shattered Friday when Orange beat Capistrano Valley 67-47 in a nonleague football game at Capistrano Valley High.

Orange quarterback Zachary Siskowic threw for a school-record 477 yards and seven touchdowns. The transfer from Crespi also ran for 81 yards and a touchdown. Earlier in the day, he received a scholarship offer from Portland State.

“I feel great. I have to give all the credit to my linemen and receivers,” Siskowic said. “They (Capo Valley) came out and gave us exactly what we prepared for and wanted, so we took advantage of that.”

  • Orange quarterback Zachary Siskowic carries the ball during a quarterback keeper play during Friday’s nonleague game against Capistrano Valley on September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Orange running back Kobe Boykin carries the ball during a nonleague game against Capistrano Valley on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Orange defender Jett White makes an interception that he carried back for a 90-yard touchdown during a nonleague game at Capistrano Valley High School on Friday night, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley quarterback Trey Kukuk throws the ball while on the run on a 2-point conversion attempt during a nonleague game against Orange on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley quarterback Trey Kukuk throws the ball during a nonleague game against Orange on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley players celebrate a touchdown by wide receiver Owen Taylor during a nonleague game against Orange on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley defender Kayden Pascua sacks Orange quarterback Zachary Siskowic during Friday’s nonleague game between the two teams on September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Orange receiver Jonathan Smith Jr. makes a leaping catch during a nonleague game at Capistrano Valley High School on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley wide receiver Owen Taylor carries the ball after a catch during a nonleague game against Orange on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley wide receiver Owen Taylor carries the ball after a catch during a nonleague game against Orange on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley wide receiver Owen Taylor carries the ball after a catch during a nonleague game against Orange on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Orange quarterback Zachary Siskowic throws the ball during a nonleague game against Capistrano Valley on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley quarterback Trey Kukuk throws the ball during a nonleague game against Orange on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley wide receiver Dane Benedix carries the ball after a catch during a nonleague game against Orange on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley quarterback Trey Kukuk throws the ball during a nonleague game against Orange on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Orange quarterback Zachary Siskowic throws the ball during a nonleague game against Capistrano Valley on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Orange quarterback Zachary Siskowic throws the ball during a nonleague game against Capistrano Valley on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley’s homecoming princesses stand together during the halftime show at Friday’s football game against Orange on September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Capistrano Valley Cougars take the field for their nonleague home game against Orange on Friday, September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley students cheer on the Cougars during Friday’s home football game against Orange on September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

  • Capistrano Valley marching band members perform on the field before the start of Friday’s football game against Orange on September 17, 2021. (Photo by Jeff Antenore, Contributing Photographer)

of

Expand

“This is exactly where we thought he would be,” Orange coach Robert Pedroza said. “We know how good he is. Tonight, he was special.”

On the other side of the field, Capo Valley receiver Dane Benedix had a school-record 299 yards receiving on 13 receptions with three touchdowns.

The momentum of the game flipped in Orange’s favor late in the second quarter. Capo Valley (3-2) had a 14-13 lead and was driving into the red zone. Orange’s freshman cornerback, Arron “Jett” White, intercepted a pass and ran it back 90 yards for a touchdown to put Orange (2-2) ahead 19-13.

Shortly after, Siskowic threw a 25-yard touchdown pass to Kobe Boykin to give Orange a 25-13 lead at halftime.

The floodgates opened from there for Siskowic and the Orange offense. Early in the third quarter, Siskowic threw a 72-yard touchdown pass to Jonathan Smith Jr. to extend the lead to 32-14.

After the Orange defense made a goal-line stand, Siskowic threw a 96-yard touchdown to Corbin Hale to put Orange up by 25 points. Hale caught five passes for 163 yards and three touchdowns.

Capo Valley quarterback Trey Kukuk then rushed for a 7-yard touchdown to cut the lead to 19 points. Kukuk had four passing touchdowns and two rushing touchdowns.

Siskowic threw a 59-yard touchdown pass to Smith to put Orange back in front 46-20. Smith had a team-high 168 yards on four catches with two touchdowns.

Capo Valley responded immediately with a 35-yard touchdown pass from Kukuk to Benedix.

Cougars kicker Dylan Fingersh recovered his own onside kick and Kukuk capped the short scoring drive with a quarterback sneak to cut Orange’s lead to 46-33.

Siskowic threw a 68-yard touchdown pass to Boykin and at that point, his last five completions were touchdown passes.

On the ensuing kickoff, Jaden Cassidy returned it 87 yards for a Capo Valley touchdown.

Boykin and Siskowic each ran for touchdowns in the fourth quarter to ensure the victory. Boykin rushed for 137 yards and had 112 yards receiving with three total touchdowns.

“It’s nice to have these games that are good, competitive and close,” Pedroza said. “Hopefully that prepares us for later on. It’s a big win. It’s a great environment here and that’s a great football team. Anytime you get a road win at a place like this, it’s a huge program win.”

Kukuk, who was the county’s leading passer entering Friday, completed 18 of 42 passes for 318 yards with four touchdowns. His six total touchdowns are a career-high.

Capo Valley will host Cypress on Friday, Sept. 24.

Orange has won two consecutive games after an 0-2 start. The Panthers will host undefeated Foothill on Thursday at El Modena High.

 

Read more about Records broken as Orange football defeats Capistrano Valley in 67-47 shootout This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

Moreno, Martin help Sonora football find a way past Esperanza

LA HABRA — Sonora’s young football team might have gained a measure of maturity during its nonleague game against Esperanza on Friday at La Habra High School.

With junior running back Pedro Moreno playing a key role in Sonora’s ball-control offense, and sophomore quarterback Landon Martin scoring all the points, the Raiders were able to earn a 10-7 victory over the Aztecs.

The victory was the first of the season for the Raiders (1-2), who were playing with a freshman, four sophomores and four juniors on the starting offense.

Moreno, who was playing in only his sixth high school football game, ran for 134 yards on 26 carries.

While he didn’t score any points, Moreno’s runs were the main reason the Raiders were able to keep drives alive and keep the Esperanza offense off the field.

Moreno’s first two rushes of the game were for 22 and 20 yards on back-to-back carries.

The 20-yard gain set up the Raiders with a first-and-goal from the Esperanza 4.

The drive sputtered however, and Raiders had to settle for a 20-yard field goal from Martin, who is also the team’s kicker and punter.

“That kid has so much potential,” Sonora coach Ken Oberlander said of Moreno. “He’s going to be a really good football player. I think people around Orange County are going to hear his name because he is just getting started.”

Sonora’s second scoring drive started on its 26. Moreno gained 22 yards on that drive, but the key play was Josiah Binggeli’s 23-yard run which put Sonora on the Aztecs 11.

Three plays later, Martin scored from the 7 on a perfectly executed counter play to give the Raiders a 10-0 lead.

After their first two drives of the third quarter resulted in a punt and a fourth-down stop, the Aztecs (2-2) got possession once again, this time starting at their 23 with 11 seconds left in the quarter.

The Aztecs put together their best drive of the game, converting on two fourth downs and on a third-and-9 from the Raiders 16.

Quarterback Christian Lee scored on a quarterback sneak from the 1 to make it a three-point game.

But the 17-play drive ate up nearly nine minutes.

After an unsuccessful onside-kick attempt, the Raiders took over at the Aztecs 41 and ran the final three minutes and 20 seconds off the clock.

“It was so nice to show up tonight and improve from last week,” said Oberlander, referring to the Raiders’’ 41-7 defeat against Irvine.

 

Read more about Moreno, Martin help Sonora football find a way past Esperanza This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

Los Alamitos boys water polo sinks Santa Margarita to open South Coast Tournament

COSTA MESA — Los Alamitos’ boys water polo team might not be part of a high-profile league or have much recent experience in the Division 1 playoffs but the Griffins showed Thursday that their scrappy style can knock off a heavyweight.

Attacker Caleb Francisco and Nicholas Keane each scored five goals as the No. 9 Griffins defeated reigning Trinity League champion and No. 8 Santa Margarita 13-9 in a first-round match at the South Coast Tournament at Costa Mesa.

Los Alamitos (2-2) later fell to top-seeded Huntington Beach 16-7 in the second round but the Griffins showcased a strong press and dedicated counterattack against the Eagles (3-3).

The reigning Wave League champion Griffins forced at least five turnovers in each period and led for the final 21 minutes, 34 seconds of the match.

Francisco added three steals to help lead the defense. Junior goalie Tomas De Luca added six saves in his matchup against Santa Margarita goalie Zach Cwertnia (seven saves).

Los Alamitos led 9-4 at halftime before Santa Margarita trimmed its deficit to 9-7 in the third. But the Griffins called timeout and received a steal and breakaway goal from sophomore Cole Francisco to end the Eagles’ surge.

Keane then scored the first two goals of the fourth, converting a strike from center and power-play chance to give the Griffins a 12-7 lead.

Junior Nick Leung added two goals for Los Alamitos, which competed in the Division 2 playoffs in 2019 and 2018.

Nicholas Ohlson scored three goals to lead the Eagles while Spencer Averitt added four assists and played strong 2-meter defense.

In the quarterfinals Friday at 6 p.m., Huntington Beach will face Surf League foe Laguna Beach, which beat The Bishop’s 12-10 in the second round.

In other results, Mater Dei defeated Loyola 13-8 to advance to the quarterfinals to take on Trinity League rival Orange Lutheran, 14-8 winner against Oaks Christian.

Newport Harbor also reached the quarterfinals and will play host Harvard-Westlake.

Sacred Heart Prep and Cathedral Catholic will meet in the other quarterfinal at Foothill.

Read more about Los Alamitos boys water polo sinks Santa Margarita to open South Coast Tournament This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

OCVarsity football wrap-up: All of Thursday’s stories, scores and more


Support our high school sports coverage by becoming a digital subscriber. Subscribe now


This is the place to find all of OCVarsity’s coverage of the Orange County high school football games on Thursday.

THURSDAY GAMES

SCORES  

High school football: Scores from all of Thursday’s Week 4 games

STORIES

Focused Cypress football sprints past Katella to continue sizzling start

Huntington Beach football scores early, often in win over Marina

Pacifica football routs Buena Park with big plays from Cowens, Ross

Tustin football dominated by Ayala, sophomore QB Bryan Wilson

Defense stars for Laguna Hills football in victory over Northwood

Saddleback football continues hot start with win over Bolsa Grande

DID YOU SEE THIS?

Deep Pass: Delgado’s top 3 targets for Week 4

Malachi Nelson and Makai Lemon are lifelong friends, a dynamic duo on the field and Oklahoma commits

Fryer on Football: Previews and predictions for Week 4’s top high school games

OCVarsity Gridiron: Fryer and Albano discuss the top Week 4 games and make their picks

Football notes: Brea Olinda finds silver lining after challenging spring season

Huntley’s Week 4 list of football hits, misses and helmet stickers

Orange County football leaders: Updated after Week 3

 

Read more about OCVarsity football wrap-up: All of Thursday’s stories, scores and more This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico