Prince William says royals are ‘very much not a racist family’

By Angela Dewan and Schams Elwazer | CNN

Prince William has denied the royal family is racist in his first public remarks since his brother Prince Harry, and his wife Meghan, made explosive claims in a TV interview.

Asked by a reporter during a visit to a school in east London if the royals were a “racist family,” the Duke of Cambridge said: “We’re very much not a racist family.”

Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, made a series of damning accusations against the royal family in an interview with Oprah Winfrey, which aired in the UK on Monday night.

In response to a question on whether he had spoken to his brother since the interview with Oprah Winfrey, Prince William said, “I haven’t spoken to him yet but I will do.”

Harry and Meghan’s interview has sent the Palace into a tailspin and triggered a nationwide debate on the royals, race and the role of the media in perpetuating xenophobia.

In the interview, the Duchess said that the skin tone of the couple’s child, Archie, was discussed as a potential issue before he was born. The couple would not reveal who had made the remarks.

In the interview, Meghan described having regular suicidal thoughts during her brief time as a working royal, and said the palace had offered her and her son inadequate security and protection.

Buckingham Palace broke its silence on Tuesday evening, saying in a statement on behalf of the Queen that the allegations of racism were concerning and were being “taken very seriously.”

“The whole family is saddened to learn the full extent of how challenging the last few years have been for Harry and Meghan,” the statement reads.

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Tiger Woods told police after crash that he didn’t remember driving

By Amir Vera, Jordan Guzzardo and Cheri Mossburg | CNN

When Tiger Woods crashed his car in Southern California last week, he told sheriff’s deputies that he had no recollection of driving or how the accident happened, according to a Los Angeles County affidavit for a search warrant of the vehicle’s black box.

Woods was driving February 23 in Rancho Palos Verdes, near Los Angeles, shortly after 7 a.m. PT when his Genesis SUV hit a “Welcome to Rolling Hills Estates” sign, crossed a center divider and traveled more than 150 feet across the shoulder of the road through shrubbery and uprooted tree before coming to a stop on the driver’s side, according to the affidavit.

Woods sustained injuries and cuts to his face and multiple fractures and compound fractures to his right leg, the affidavit said.

The documents, obtained by CNN, said Woods regained consciousness before sheriff’s deputies arrived at the scene of the crash. While he remained sitting in the driver’s seat of the vehicle with blood on his face and chin, Woods told the deputies he had no recollection of driving or how the collision occurred.

“The deputies asked him how the collision occurred. Driver said he did not know and did not even remember driving,” the affidavit read. “Driver was treated for his injuries at the hospital and was asked there again how the collision occurred. He repeated that he did not know and did not remember driving.”

A witness also approached the vehicle after hearing the crash and noticed Woods was “unconscious and not responding to his questions,” Deputy Johann Schloegl, the traffic collision investigator on the crash, wrote in the affidavit.

There was no evidence Woods was impaired by drugs or alcohol, according to first responder interviews cited by the affidavit.

The SUV was provided to Woods by the sponsor of the golf tournament he hosted over the previous weekend. The LA County Sheriff’s Office told CNN in a statement earlier this week it executed a search warrant for the black box in the courtesy vehicle.

The data stored in the box, along with “several data recording modules” in the vehicle, “may provide information regarding the use of brakes and the accelerator by the driver” as well as other factors that could determine the cause of the crash, the affidavit said.

Speaking to USA Today, Schloegl said Tuesday the search warrant was just due diligence and he didn’t consider the probe a criminal investigation.

“If somebody is involved in a traffic collision, we’ve got to reconstruct the traffic collision, if there was any reckless driving, if somebody was on their cell phone or something like that,” Schloegl told the network. “We determine if there was a crime. If there was no crime, we close out the case, and it was a regular traffic collision.”

Authorities have previously said they believe the incident was “purely an accident” but they would have to pull the black box event recorder from the vehicle to make that determination.

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3 ‘transcendent’ figures in commercial real estate

Last Wednesday I agreed to an early meeting, in person, no less. On the drive back, I tuned into my favorite radio talk station, KABC 790. It was there I sadly learned of Rush Limbaugh’s passing.

I must admit, rarely did I listen. As a matter of fact, I can’t recall the last time. But, his brand saved AM radio and created a whole genre of content – conservative talk.

Many of the stalwarts in the industry today have Limbaugh to thank – including the two gents – Armstrong and Getty – to whom I was listening. Limbaugh transcended his craft. Meaning? Everyone knew him, even if you weren’t a fan. Michael Jordan, Arnold Palmer, Muhammad Ali, Vince Lombardi, Oprah Winfrey, Billy Graham and Stephen Spielberg all shared a similar impact on their professions.

Even if you never watched golf or consumed a lemonade iced-tea, you recognize Arnold Palmer. Transcendent figures do that – become household names.

You may be wondering, what does this have to do with commercial real estate? Only this: Our trade has similar figures who’ve broken the shackles of normal and transformed our industry. Allow me to introduce you to a few. Wait, you probably already know them.

Roger Staubach, founder of The Staubach Co., U.S. Naval Academy grad, Heisman Trophy winner, multiple Super Bowl titles with the Dallas Cowboys. Thanks for that, Roger! You made this young man – a lifelong Cowboy fan – very happy in the 1970s.

When Staubach retired from the NFL, his focus turned to commercial real estate. He moonlighted in brokerage during the off-season with the Henry S. Miller Co. While there, he observed a need. Corporate tenants were lacking representation.

During those days, owners of commercial real estate engaged brokers to market their assets and locate occupants to fill their spaces. But, who was the tenant’s advocate? Generally, it was a hybrid agent who did landlord and lessee work.

Staubach ’s company forged the tenant rep concept whereby his company’s only clients were the occupiers of office and industrial buildings. Contractors, space planners, architects, attorneys, project managers and moving companies were all components of Staubach’s offering. When you hired Staubach to secure a location, all of those service providers were part of the deal — at no cost. He revolutionized the way in which corporate occupants were represented. Staubach was sold to Jones Lang LaSalle in 2008 for $613 million. How’s that for timing?

Andrew C. Florance, founder, director, president and CEO of CoStar Group Inc. Through CoStar, Florance pioneered the concept of commercial real estate firms outsourcing research functions to a third-party information provider, combining the operational efficiencies of a computer-based information system with the more thorough, standardized and higher quality property information produced by the industry’s first independent research organization.”

From experience, CoStar is the best in its class, and we rely on its data daily. CoStar is the gold standard when it comes to tasks such as sourcing available inventory, researching ownership, and reviewing market trends.

Bill Lee, founder of Lee & Associates Commercial Real Estate Services. Lee was a top producer at Grubb & Ellis in the 1970s. His observation was that there was no intraoffice cooperation. An agent within the office had zero incentive to work with his fellow agent. Quite the contrary, in many cases the agent would “pocket” the information so that he could “double end” the deal with his own buyer. Lee wondered if there was a way to create intraoffice cooperation through a sharing of commissions and profit.

Lee and four of his Grubb & Ellis friends started Lee & Associates in 1979. The theory was simple but revolutionary: Create a system that would reward profitability and encourage cooperation. Each of the original “partners” was free to broker deals in any area, call on any client they chose (as long as another Lee agent didn’t have an existing relationship) and the agents were encouraged to share with each other.

Profit was divided at the end of the year and apportioned to each partner according to his contribution. The resulting “splits” exceeded anything in the industry then and now. Lee & Associates’ “principals” (as we are now called) enjoy the best splits in the industry. The firm is now the largest broker-owned company in the U.S. boasting over 60 offices globally.

Allen C. Buchanan, SIOR, is a principal with Lee & Associates Commercial Real Estate Services in Orange. He can be reached at abuchanan@lee-associates.com or 714.564.7104.

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Tiger Woods is transferred to a new LA hospital as fellow golfers express their hopes for full recovery

By Travis Caldwell | CNN

Following a car accident Tuesday morning in California that resulted in significant leg injuries and required an extraction from his vehicle by first responders, Tiger Woods now begins the arduous recovery process.

A new chapter began Thursday with his transfer to a second Los Angeles-area hospital for “continuing orthopedic care and recovery,” according to a statement.

Dr. Anish Mahajan, the chief medical officer and interim CEO at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, confirmed that Woods was moved to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, which is approximately 20 miles away.

“On behalf of our staff, it was an honor to provide orthopedic trauma care to one of our generation’s greatest athletes,” Mahajan said in the statement.

Woods’ injuries include “comminuted open fractures affecting both the upper and lower portions of the tibia and fibula bones,” Mahajan said Tuesday, meaning the bones broke into more than two pieces and pierced the skin. A rod was inserted into the tibia to stabilize the leg. Additional injuries to the bones of the foot and ankle were stabilized with a combination of screws and pins.

Woods told investigators at the hospital after the accident that “he had no recollection of the crash” that left him seriously injured, Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva told CNN’s Erin Burnett on Wednesday.

Cedars-Sinai network is known for sports rehabilitations

The reasons for Woods’ transfer have not been released, yet facilities affiliated with Cedars-Sinai are known for their sports medicine and related surgeries. Should Woods and his family choose to continue care within its network, options are available in terms of recovery.

The Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute provides orthopedic surgeries, and practitioners at their clinics work with Los Angeles-area sports teams. Other professional athletes from around the country have had procedures performed at their centers.

The California Rehabilitation Institute, a partnership between Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Health and Select Medical, provides programs as well for those on the mend.

The institute is “the largest inpatient facility of its kind on the West Coast,” according to its website, and “is designed to help each patient recover the strength, skills and independence they need to return home and resume their lives.”

Golf pros continue to show support

Webb Simpson, who is tied atop the Thursday leaderboard at the PGA WGC-Workday Championship in Florida, shared his thoughts on Woods, saying his focus was on the golfer’s well-being.

“Of course you think about the golf career, you think about what he’s done for the game, but the thing I kept thinking about was his kids and how thankful I am that he made it out of that,” Simpson said.

He added, “The biggest thing I was concerned with, following the news and texting buddies, trying to figure out what was going on was, ‘Is he OK? Is he going to make it?’”

Phil Mickelson expressed similar sentiments Thursday after his round at a PGA Tour Champions event in Arizona.

“All the guys here understand and appreciate what he has meant to the game of golf, and for us and the PGA Tour. We are all very appreciative and supportive of what he has done for us. But right now, that is so far from our minds,” Mickelson said.

“I thought Rory McIlroy really said it well when he said that we’re just lucky and appreciative that his kids didn’t lose their father. We all are hoping and praying for a full and speedy recovery. We are all so thankful because that looked awful. We are thankful that he is still with us,” Mickelson said.

McIlroy said on Wednesday when asked about a potential career comeback for Woods, “He’s not Superman… He’s a human being at the end of the day. And he’s already been through so much. At this stage I think everyone should just be grateful that he’s here, that he’s alive, that his kids haven’t lost their dad.

“That’s the most important thing. Golf is so far from the equation right now, it’s not even on the map at this point,” McElroy said.

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