Protester struck by SUV at Breonna Taylor demonstration In Hollywood

A protester in Hollywood was struck Thursday night by an SUV speeding by a crowd of marchers on the second night of protests related to the killing of Breonna Taylor by Louisville Metropolitan Police Department officers.

Shortly before 9 p.m., a black SUV sped by the crowd, striking a protester before speeding away again. The Los Angeles Fire Department responded and took one person to a hospital, according to the LAFD’s Nicholas Prange.

The protest began at 7 p.m. and by 7:30 p.m., at least 200 people were sitting and standing in the grass outside the entrance to the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, located at 6000 Santa Monica Blvd., in Hollywood.

Vehicles could be heard driving by the protest honking in support, and a series of speakers addressed the crowd.

Demonstrators chanted “Black lives they matter here” and vehicles could be heard driving by the protest honking in support, as a series of speakers addressed the crowd.

After the rally, demonstrators marched through Hollywood accompanied by multiple vehicles, some with signs that said “Defund. Abolish.” and “Defund police, invest in community.”

The first night of protests began around 6 p.m. Wednesday near Union Station with a march along downtown streets before returning to Union Station around 11 p.m.

Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency medical worker, was fatally shot in her apartment early on March 13 by officers executing a search warrant, according to Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron.

Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Detectives Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove were advised by superiors to knock and announce their presence in serving this specific search warrant, Cameron said.

Evidence from the Special Prosecution Unit’s investigation shows that officers both knocked and announced their presence at the apartment. The officers’ statements about their announcement are corroborated by an independent witness who was near in proximity to Taylor’s apartment, Cameron said.

When officers were unable to get anyone to answer or open the door to the apartment, the decision was made to breach the door. After breaching the door, Mattingly was the first, and only officer, to enter the residence, Cameron said.

Mattingly identified two individuals standing beside one another at the end of the hall, a male and female. In his statement, Mattingly said the male was holding a gun, arms extended, in a shooting stance, Cameron said.

Mattingly saw the man’s gun fire, heard a “boom,” and immediately knew he was shot as a result of feeling heat in his upper thigh, Cameron said.

Kenneth Walker, Taylor’s boyfriend, fired the shot that hit Mattingly, Cameron said.

Walker admitted firing one shot and was the first to shoot, Cameron said.

Mattingly returned fire down the hallway, firing six shots. Almost simultaneously, Cosgrove, also in the doorway area, shot 16 times, all in a matter of seconds, Cameron said.

Hankison fired his weapon 10 times, including from outside a sliding glass door and through a bedroom window, Cameron said.

Some bullets traveled through apartment four and into apartment three, before some exited that apartment. At the time, three residents of apartment three were at home, including a man, a pregnant woman and a child, Cameron said.

The investigation found that Mattingly and Cosgrove were justified in their use of force, after having been fired upon by Walker, Cameron said.

Kentucky State Police and FBI ballistics analysis reached different conclusions, creating a reasonable doubt in the evidence about who fired the fatal shot.

Hankison was indicted by a Jefferson County grand jury on three counts of wanton endangerment, a Class D felony. Mattingly and Cosgrove were not charged.

Hankison was fired by the LMPD on June 23, 2020

The warrant used to search Taylor’s apartment was connected to a suspect who did not live there, and no drugs were found inside.

“Breonna Taylor was sleeping when police raided her apartment and killed her,” Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Burbank, tweeted Thursday. “She deserves justice.

“Breonna — and all Black Americans — deserve a system of policing that prioritizes justice and dignity over fear and bigotry, so a tragedy like this never happens again.”

Taylor’s family received a $12 million settlement payment from Louisville.

“I am completely mortified that our criminal justice system has failed Breonna Taylor, her family and friends, and frankly, it has failed our country,” said Black Lives Matter founder and Executive Director Patrisse Cullors, who is based in Los Angeles.

“We are going to continue the work that we have started in the name of Breonna Taylor and countless Black lives cut short at the hands of police brutality, systemic racism and white supremacy.

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Protests, looting continue in Southern California as new week begins

Protests for racial equality, woven between bouts of looting and vandalism by opportunists, continued Monday as Southern California residents started to pick up the pieces from a destructive weekend.

Monday marked the sixth day of nationwide unrest over the death of 46-year-old George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody. Floyd, who was accused of passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a corner convenience store, was killed when fired Officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for almost nine minutes.

Early in the day,.an autopsy carried out by independent experts hired by the man’s family declared Floyd died from “asphyxiation from sustained pressure” caused by the knee on his neck, putting the results at odds with that of the Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s Office, according to CNN.

Cities and counties across Southern California set curfews in some areas as early as 1 p.m. Monday as the National Guard and police departments attempted to avoid the looting and destruction experienced over the weekend.

Indeed, even before nightfall, some looters in Hollywood and Van Nuys were met with LAPD police officers and handcuffs. Police also arrested a man in Upland for allegedly brandishing a firearm during a demonstration, officials said.

President Donald Trump threatened to deploy military to the streets of American cities in response, saying he would send “thousands and thousands” of soldiers if governors did not shut down the protests. Trump called governors “weak” for not arresting people during a video conference call with state leaders, according to the Associated Press.

Sunday saw the largest number of arrests so far in Los Angeles County, including 700 in Los Angeles, 73 in Long Beach and more than 400 in Santa Monica. Vandalism and looting in Long Beach and Santa Monica left businesses destroyed in the three cities, including iconic destinations such as Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica and Pine Avenue and The Pike in Long Beach.

  • Black Lives Matter supporters hold a peaceful protest outside the Van Nuys Civic Center on Monday, June 1, 2020 to demand justice for George Floyd. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Protesters drive by a demonstration outside the Van Nuys Civic Center on Monday, June 1, 2020 where protesters were demanding justice for George Floyd. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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  • Protesters block an intersection and confront police in Anaheim on Monday, June 1, 2020. Hundreds gathered to protest a Minnesota police officer’s killing of an unarmed black man.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Hundreds of protesters gather in Anaheim in response to a Minnesota police officer’s killing of an unarmed black man.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Tommy Fullobe of Anaheim joins hundreds of protesters who gather in Anaheim in response to a Minnesota police officer’s killing of an unarmed black man.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Protesters clash with Riverside law enforcement Monday, June 1, 2020, in downtown Riverside after protesters failed to disperse during a protest for the death of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • LAPD guard firefighters as they mop up a fire that broke out in a strip mall at Haskel and Vanowen streets in Van Nuys, CA Monday, June 1, 2020. Looting erupted in the area after a peaceful George Floyd protest in Van Nuys, the cause of the fire is under investigation. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • SisterJohn Ellen Turner flashes a peace sign to protesters who pass St. Catherine’s Academy on Monday, June 1, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • “George Floyd!” was chanted in downtown Riverside as several hundred protests his death on Monday, June 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators in Westwood took to the streets on Monday, June 1, 2020, to protest police abuse in the wake of the George Floyd, a black man who died in the custody of Minneapolis police. (Photo by David Rosenfeld)

  • Demonstrators in Westwood took to the streets on Monday, June 1, 2020, to protest police abuse in the wake of the George Floyd, a black man who died in the custody of Minneapolis police. (Photo by David Rosenfeld)

  • Protesters take over the intersection of Victory and Van Nuys Boulevards on Monday, June 1, 2020 to demand justice for George Floyd in Van Nuys. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Protesters take over the intersection of Victory and Van Nuys Boulevards on Monday, June 1, 2020 to demand justice for George Floyd in Van Nuys. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A large group of protestors took over streets in Hollywood to protest the death of George Floyd Monday, June 1, 2020. The group started at Sunset and Vine and marched through Hollywood streets blocking traffic at times. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A large group of protestors took over streets in Hollywood to protest the death of George Floyd Monday, June 1, 2020. The group started at Sunset and Vine and marched through Hollywood streets blocking traffic at times. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A large group of protestors took over streets in Hollywood to protest the death of George Floyd Monday, June 1, 2020. The group started at Sunset and Vine and marched through Hollywood streets blocking traffic at times. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore apologized to business owners, saying his officers were overwhelmed by the “forces of those that wish to exact violence in the community.” The department tempered its response initially to avoid intimidating the peaceful protests, he said. Eighty-eight buildings on Melrose Avenue alone were destroyed, according to Moore.

Moore, along with other county law enforcement officials, pledged to scale up their presence with assistance from from the National Guard. Some 2,000 troops will have deployed in the city by Tuesday, June 2, Moore said. The police chiefs urged protesters to work with law enforcement and to call out anyone who uses the protests as an opportunity to loot and vandalize.

“We need that communication, because in the absence of it, we have to overwhelm,” Moore said. “We have to bring in resources that will appear to stifle the message.”

Residents and business owners started their week cleaning up broken glass and pillaged storefronts in Long Beach, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, San Bernardino and Hemet. Police chiefs in Santa Monica and Long Beach, in particular, took flak from residents who believed their departments did not do enough to protect property.

Jack Sarkissian, owner of Jack’s Jewelers in Santa Monica, said looters spent two hours in his store despite his calls to police.

“They just didn’t do anything,” he said, adding that the looters had “all the time they needed to get anything they needed.”

A petition calling for the removal of Santa Monica Police Chief Cynthia Renauld garnered more than 3,000 signatures as of Monday afternoon. Renauld at a press conference warned her department would catch those responsible for the coordinated looting at Santa Monica shops.

“We have been going through the city collecting that evidence. We have had our residents sending us videos and license plates,” Renauld said. “We’ll work through this one day at a time to ensure that we protect justice, civility and safety in the community, while still ensuring that right for people to talk to us through peaceful protest and the expression of what they’re feeling.”

Renauld said about 95 percent of those arrested in Santa Monica did not live in the city.

The protests in Southern California before nightfall Monday were largely peaceful, with small pockets of looting in some areas.

The movement spilled into the San Fernando Valley for the first time Monday with hundreds of peaceful protesters converging in Van Nuys at what was supposed to be a canceled event. Looters used the cover of the growing protest to hit businesses along Van Nuys Boulevard, reportedly raiding a Boost Mobile store, a dispensary and a pharmacy. At one point, some members of the crowd threw water bottles at officers guarding boarded up shops near the Civic Center.

Looters hit a jewelry store and CVS in Encino while protesters occupied police in other areas of the city.

Elsewhere, thousands of protesters gathered again in downtown Los Angeles, where some at City Hall yelled for National Guardsmen to “go home.”

Police fired rubbers bullets to try to disperse roughly 200 demonstrators blocking lanes on the 405 Freeway near UCLA in Westwood. The crowd left the freeway and splintered after being given a five-minute warning to leave the area.

The initial event was organized by the Student Activist Project at UCLA, which had actually tried to call off the event.

Others marched along Hollywood Boulevard carrying a sign that read “Say their names” and listing those who have died at the hands of police. The National Guard set up with Humvees in the area to try to contain the marchers, but there were no clashes as of Monday evening.

Police arrested looters in Van Nuys and at a Rite Aid in Hollywood later in the night.

Officers in Glendora kneeled alongside protesters for an eight-minute moment of silence as a sign of solidarity.

In Orange County, hundreds gathered in Anaheim’s La Palma Park in the first of three protests expected Monday. The protesters gathered in the grass and listened to speakers describing how police brutality had affected their lives.

“There’s a lot of people hoping you are going to lose your sanity and attack our city and we are here to prove them wrong,” a speaker said to the crowd, drawing loud cheers.

The protesters later merged with another group in front of Anaheim City Hall, but left as police enforced a 6 p.m. curfew.

In Riverside, more than 4,000 people protested peacefully against police violence. Many refused to leave once the 6 p.m. curfew rolled around. They clapped rhythmically as officers surrounded them and ordered them to disperse nearly an hour later.

Throughout Southern California, communities braced for another long night with businesses and civic buildings setting up barricades and police staging around potential targets for looters. In response to the looting over the weekend, Target announced it was temporarily shutting down stores across the nation, including 20 in Southern California. The retailer pledged to continue to pay workers’ salaries and benefits while the stores are closed.

Protesters laid on the ground and chanted “I Can’t Breathe” in West Covina near the 10 Freeway. Police closed off the entrances to the Eastland Center mall in advance.

Torrance’s Del Amo Fashion Center shut down early Monday and police officers blocked off the entrances using city buses.

San Bernardino County closed its offices and coronavirus testing sites early in the day to allow police to focus elsewhere.

Staff writers Nick Green, Ryan Carter, Pierce Singgih, David Rosenfield, Ruby Gonzales, Josh Cain, David Downey, Beau Yarbrough, Brian Whitehead, Jennifer Iyer, Kevin Smith, Hunter Lee, Olga Grigoryants, Ariella Plachta, Scott Schwebke, Jeong Park and Sean Emery contributed to this report.

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Photos: Turbulent day careens into a violent night in Southern California

During the day, some protests proved boisterous and passionate. Others turned turbulent, confrontational and violent. And much of the chaos endured into the evening as lawlessness ruled after dark in scattered communities around Southern California.

  • A large building burns along Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Looters leap out the broken window of Walgreens after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

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  • A looter walks away with goods from a store along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Several hundred protesters threw fireworks and other explosives Saturday night at police while marching in Santa Ana, walking into traffic and shouting “black lives matter” in remembrance of George Floyd. (Photo by Mindy Schauer.Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A lone demonstrator kneels in front of LAPD officers as they stand their ground in front of their headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Police form a blockade as a large building burns along Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march off of the southbound 71 Freeway on the Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • LAPD arrest a man along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A couple waits to be processed and arrested by police along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march off of the southbound 71 Freeway on the Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A firework is setoff as demonstrators march on the on the southbound 71 Freeway towards Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators vent to police in riot gear during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in front of the Pomona Police station in Pomona on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A man in Santa Ana on Saturday night pushes a cart full of burning paper toward police, who responded by firing pepper balls. (Eric Licas/Southern California News Group)

  • A looted Sephora store in the Grove Shopping center in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A woman waits to be processed and arrested by police along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Workers board up Susie Cakes on 9th and Hope as dusk falls in a chaotic Dowtown Los Angeles on Saturday. Photo: Bradley Bermont

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of the LA Times building in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Looters grab goods from a store along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of store fronts across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • A looted Apple store in the Grove Shopping center in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A protester in Santa Ana kicks a flaming garbage can down Bristol in Santa Ana on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Protesters in Santa Ana hurl fireworks at police on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators look on as artist Celos paints a mural of George Floyd along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A man looks at mannequins tossed from a window as demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD officers guard the headquarters as protestors make their way up the street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters leap out the broken window of Walgreens after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD confronts a man that doesn’t want to follow directions along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A looter breaks into a store and runs out with clothing front across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • A man in wheel chair rides past LAPD officers as they guard Broadway along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a Jewelry store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD arrest a man along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD officers point non lethal weapons at protestors along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Highway Patrol officers inspect the California Bear bank along 3rd after a break in after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD point non lethal weapons at protestors in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators look on as artist Celos paints a mural of George Floyd along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators graffiti’s a wall in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators block a street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators graffiti in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of the LA Times building in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD prepares to fire on Demonstrator as they break glass out of store fronts across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators hold up their hands as LAPD blocks the street along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A demonstrator opens up a fire extinguisher along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a Jewelry store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest past City Hall death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest past City Hall death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Store owners mark the store front “Don’t Touch, Black Owners” along 2nd street after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A LAPD helicopter flies over downtown in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators hold signs and scream toward LAPD officers across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD comes out in force along Broadway as looters breaking stores after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Demonstrators drives past the Million Dollar theatre where it reads Stay Strong LA along Broadway and 3rd Street after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators walk past LAPD officers guarding the headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators walk past LAPD officers guarding the headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • An LAPD officer stands guard along San Pedro Street as a man wearing a mask sits on the curb after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march along 2nd street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators block 5th street in front of the LAPD after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

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Spurred by the death of George Floyd, a Minnesota black man who died during a violent arrest, mammoth demonstrations rolled out for the fourth straight day in about a dozen communities around the Southland on Saturday, May 30. After dark — despite curfews installed by Los Angeles and other communities — clusters of looters smashed windows, robbed retail venues and set fires as law enforcement tried to keep pace.

 

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Police use drone to find a missing woman in Orange

Officials in Orange turned to a drone when a woman went missing on Monday, May 25.

Family members told police the elderly woman left with her dog on early Monday morning and had not been seen in three hours, according to the Orange Police Department’s Facebook page.

Happy to report her and her dog are recovering well. pic.twitter.com/0n3JCAHY1j

— Orange Police Department (California) (@CityOfOrangePD) May 25, 2020

Officers responded to a call at 11:42 a.m. to the area of 5100 East Henley Pl. and shortly called in a drone operator to check the hillside of Via Escola near Weston Street, officials said.

During the search, officers located the woman lying on the ground, concealed within large brush, Her dog was by her side.

The Orange City Fire Department transported the woman to a nearby hospital for evaluation, officials said.

“We are happy to report the missing person and her dog are recovering and are in good condition,” officials with the Orange Police Department wrote in a Facebook post. “Great teamwork by everyone involved.”

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Investigators find fentanyl overdose killed OC inmate whose death generated controversy

An Orange County inmate whose death last year prompted protests and a claim against the county by his family was determined to have died of an accidental overdose after eating a fentanyl-laced “cookie” inside his cell, the District Attorney’s office said.

The D.A.’s office said Friday it found the O.C. Sheriff’s Department was not culpable for the death of 37-year-old Anthony Aceves, according to a letter and seven-page report submitted to Sheriff Don Barnes on April 10. Prosecutors said video showed another inmate passing an object under Aceves’ cell door at 8:12 p.m. on May 22.

The video from inside Theo Lacy Jail in Orange showed Aceves up and walking around his cell late the same night, but by 4:52 a.m. the next morning, when deputies checked on him, they found the man unresponsive. When they entered his cell minutes later, Aceves was “cold and without vital signs.”

Sheriff’s deputies later said they determined that Aceves ate the object — a cookie made with fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opiod. An independent forensic investigator later determined Aceves’ death was the result of an accidental fentanyl overdose.

Prosecutors said they found no evidence that sheriff’s deputies in the jail “failed to perform a legal duty causing the death of Aceves.”

“The evidence shows that Aceves died as a result of an accidental drug overdose and that the death was a natural one,” the prosecutors wrote in the report.

Humberto Guizar, an attorney for the mother of Aceves, who filed a $5 million wrongful-death claim against the county last year, disputed the D.A.’s office findings. He said deputies in the jail ignored Aceves’ severe mental health issues, including his diagnosis for schizophrenia, and that they “acted with deliberate indifference to a known medical condition.”

After Aceves was arrested for violating his probation in Santa Ana on April 22, he was taken to a mental health facility. Two days later on April 24, the custody officials at the O.C. Inmate Reception Center cleared him to be transferred to regular housing. But he was still under protective custody until his death about a month later, according to the D.A.’s report.

Guizar said Aceves should never have been allowed to return to the jail’s regular housing. He said sheriff’s deputies “in an indirect way caused (Aceves’) death.”

The D.A.’s office laid out the timeline of the events leading to the death of Aceves.

In the afternoon and into the evening of May 22, Aceves was walking around his cell and sector, talking to other inmates. By 8 p.m., Aceves took medication for seizures, depression and anxiety.

The report said Aceves was seen walking around his cell at around 11 p.m., hours after the other inmate passed the cookie to him.

His cellmate heard Aceves snoring loudly throughout the night, according to the report. After the deputies found Aceves unresponsive during a regular check at 4:52 a.m., they performed CPR on him.

The report doesn’t state the timeline of the deputies’ response, but says that at 5:05 a.m. — 13 minutes later — Orange Fire Department paramedics reached him. The paramedics determined Aceves was in cardiac arrest, and took him to the UCI Medical Center Emergency Room. He was pronounced dead at 5:47 a.m.

In its report, the D.A.’s office said there was no evidence of criminal negligence in sheriff’s deputies’ handling of Aceves’ death. That was despite the presence and distribution of drugs within the cell block.

“There is certainly evidence supporting a conclusion that drugs were unlawfully present inside the jail, and that certain inmates were involved in providing such drugs,” the D.A.’s office wrote.

They said O.C. prosecutors wouldn’t “be able to prove beyond a reasonable doubt criminal culpability” in the Sheriff’s Department failing to confiscate the drugs that killed Aceves.

City News Service contributed to this story.

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Gov. Newsom denies parole for ex-Mexican Mafia hitman Rene ‘Boxer’ Enriquez

SACRAMENTO — For the fourth time since 2014, the California governor’s office has stepped in to prevent a former Mexican Mafia leader who has renounced his past from seeing the light of day.

In a three-page letter issued April 12, Gov. Gavin Newsom denied parole for Rene “Boxer” Enriquez, 56, overturning a decision by the state’s parole board in December. Enriquez has been granted parole four times since 2014, but each time the governor’s office has blocked his release.


Rene “Boxer” Enriquez, 56, was denied parole by the governor’s office forthe fourth time.

Newsom’s letter notes Enriquez’s cooperation with law enforcement and involvement in rehabilitation programs but says he still considers Enriquez “dangerous.”

“I encourage him to continue down this path of self-development and insight,” Newsom wrote. “However, given his current risk to public safety, I am not prepared to approve his release.”

The family of a woman Enriquez was convicted of killing had asked that he remain in prison and questioned the sincerity of his break from organized crime.

Enriquez’s next chance for freedom will be on June 2020, when he’s to go back before the parole board. At his December hearing, Enriquez told the board “I do not deserve parole” in light of the irrevocable harm he has caused, but also said he has changed his ways.

“I’ve committed crimes that people are still feeling today. I can never undo that, but I can vow to live my life in a correct manner,” Enriquez said. “I made a commitment to never violate another law, to never harm another soul. I understand the hesitancy. … I ask for your mercy.”

In recent years, Enriquez has said he and his siblings were molested as children, including by his older brother, and cited the anger from that as a reason for joining gangs as a child. He was  initiated into a neighborhood gang through a beating at the age of 12.

Enriquez, now considered an expert witness on gangs who has helped teach a class at UC Irvine via Skype, also said he had testified in a federal grand jury hearing for a racketeering case as recently as two weeks before the parole hearing but did not go into detail.

Enriquez, of Los Angeles, was an active gang member for nearly 30 years and joined the exclusive, infamous Mexican Mafia gang in the mid 1980s. In 2003, while serving time in Pelican Bay State Prison for two murders, Enriquez dropped out of the gang and shockingly agreed to testify in federal cases against other Mexican Mafia members.

He is now considered a target for assassination by the Mexican Mafia, a relatively small gang based in Los Angeles that is said to wield influence over tens of thousands of gang members across the country.

In 2015, then-Gov. Jerry Brown cited that as his reason for denying Enriquez parole, saying if he were released it would endanger his family and whatever community he ended up being placed in through a federal witness protection program.

Enriquez also gave detailed statements to federal and state authorities, describing the Mexican Mafia — also known as La Eme — as a sophisticated network of violent criminals who planned hits and laundered money in plain sight. In 2009, with Enriquez’s help and cooperation, Los Angeles-based reporter Chris Blatchford wrote a book called “The Black Hand,” which detailed Enriquez’s life and Mexican Mafia business.

Members of the parole board said his remorse was “sincere and genuine,” and read a list of numerous self-help programs Enriquez has undergone as reasons for granting him parole. His post-release plans were kept confidential.

Enriquez is serving a 20 years-to-life sentence for two murders, and has admitted to participating in a gang rape as a young adult and sexually assaulting a fellow inmate years later. He has also been involved in jail stabbings.

He became eligible for parole in 2004, but also got in trouble that year for a drug-related offense, his most recent rule violation. After several canceled hearings, he was denied parole in 2011, then granted it in 2014, 2016, 2017 and last December. In the past his bids for parole have been supported by some law enforcement officials in Orange County because of his work assisting in Mexican Mafia investigations; though other law enforcement officials in Southern California have opposed parole for him.

Enriquez was convicted of murdering Cynthia Gavaldon and David Gallegos in separate attacks; both allegedly were related to Mexican Mafia business. Enriquez says he ordered Galvadon’s death in 1989 because she was involved in drug sales but underselling them and pocketing the difference, which members of her family deny.

Enriquez said at his December parole hearing that Gallegos was a Mexican Mafia member who had fallen into disfavor with the gang for running from a gunfight. Enriquez and a fellow gang member lured Gallegos to a “drug house,” where they “incapacitated him” with an overdose of heroin and cocaine, then took him to a nearby alley and shot him multiple times. Enriquez said another Mexican Mafia member ordered the hit.

Family members of Gavaldon spoke in opposition to his release, her cousin calling Enriquez a “murder and rapist” with an “abundant, lustful appetite for Satan’s ways.” Her uncle said Gavaldon had been killed over $10 and that Enriquez was “lying” about her being involved in drugs.

“We think he speaks with a split tongue,” Gavaldon’s cousin told the parole board. “His genuineness of remorse and repentance is not there.”

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California news agencies join forces to obtain previously secret records from hundreds of police agencies

One Los Angeles police officer had sex with a drug addict he met on foot patrol. A San Diego County sheriff’s deputy was linked to a Mexican drug cartel. That same deputy sold erectile dysfunction pills illegally to a colleague in a jail parking lot. A Brea police sergeant hawked official shoulder patches he took from the department for $95 apiece.

Such misconduct, once secret under four decades of police confidentiality statutes, now must disclosed under a new transparency law targeting police personnel records. Since late last year, police unions have been fighting fiercely in California’s courthouses to keep the internal misconduct files of their members under wraps, with little success.

But news organizations throughout the state are fighting back, forming an unprecedented collaboration to harvest and share records from every law enforcement agency in California. Putting aside competition, 32 online, radio and print agencies are working together to ensure the public gets all the information possible — and as fast as possible.

Under the new law, the collaboration has made 1,137 public records requests from 675 agencies employing police officers.

“We’re proud to partner with news organizations from throughout California on this very important public-service journalism project,” said Frank Pine, executive editor of the Southern California News Group and Bay Area News Group. “If democracy is to flourish, government agencies must be accountable to the people, and that can’t happen if the people are denied access to public records. This is especially important when it comes to law enforcement agencies, to which we entrust our safety and protection.

“The public has a right to review circumstances or incidents in which complaints or claims of serious misconduct by officers are substantiated or when officers shoot at, seriously injure or kill a member of the public,” Pine said.

Other collaborators are the Los Angeles Times, Southern California Public Radio and Voice of Orange County.

The new law — SB 1421 by state Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley — took effect Jan. 1, opening all previously hidden internal files involving shootings and the use of deadly force as well as sustained incidents of sexual misconduct and dishonesty.

Theresa Smith has been fighting for that information for nearly a decade, since her 35-year-old son, Caesar Cruz, was shot dead by five Anaheim police officers on Dec. 11, 2009. Police said they saw him reaching for his waistband, as if he were grabbing a gun. But Cruz was unarmed. Officers were operating on a tip that he was carrying a gun and selling meth.

Smith says she knows there often is more to police shootings than the official version.

“There are a lot of untruths being told. (SB) 1421 is so the public can know things,” Smith said, explaining that for the longest time, officers have been able to release the backgrounds of those arrested for crimes without having to disclose their own.

“First they kill them, and then they kill their character,” said Smith, who has become a civil rights advocate. She and her family settled their wrongful death lawsuit against the city of Anaheim for $175,000, but she still believes she hasn’t been told everything.

Perhaps the once-secret files and videos on police shootings will be more forthcoming than the public accounts that always seem to have the same ending.

“It’s the same story, the same story, ‘(officers) feared for their lives,’ ‘he reached for his waistband,’ ” Smith said. “This is the strife I have to see as a mother.”

She added, “If you don’t have anything to hide, why are you fighting so hard?”

Tom Dominguez, president of the union representing Orange County sheriff’s deputies, said the previously secret information can be misused.

“The potential for abuse under this bill will be extraordinary,” Dominguez said. “Not only would the public be given unfettered access to a peace officer’s private information, but they would also be free to provide that information to the media or disseminate it in any way they see fit.”

Many times, he said, the media or criminal defendants set out to “impugn the good character and reputation of individual peace officers.”

Dominguez added that officer-involved shootings undergo much public scrutiny from other government agencies, so no further transparency is needed. Also, there is no evidence that the previously confidential internal affairs process wasn’t working.

Efforts by Dominguez’s group, the Association of Orange County Deputy Sheriffs, to block the release of Orange County Sheriff’s Department records were rejected in court.

“In spite of this legislation and public attacks on the profession,” he said, “(deputies) will continue to do their jobs to keep our residents safe.”

Smith isn’t so trusting.

“They hide everything — if they lied on reports, if they had any sexual misconduct. And that’s important to the families” of those shot or killed by law enforcement.

 

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Garden Grove police seek public’s help in identifying adult store robbery suspects

Garden Grove police investigators are asking for the public’s help in identifying three suspects linked to a series of armed robberies at an adult bookstore, authorities said.

Three armed robberies and one attempted armed robbery occurred on March 20, May 16, June 1 and June 12 at the Garden of Eden adult bookstore at 12061 Garden Grove Blvd., the Garden Grove Police Department said in a news statement Tuesday.

Garden Grove police detective Jim Franks said the robberies have occurred between 3 and 5 a.m.

Police believe the robberies have involved a man entering the business and threatening a clerk with a semi-automatic handgun, Franks said. The suspect has fled after taking cash.

  • A suspect in a June 12 attempted robbery at a Garden Grove adult business. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

    A suspect in a June 12 attempted robbery at a Garden Grove adult business. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

  • A suspect in a June 12  attempted robbery at a Garden Grove adult business. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

    A suspect in a June 12 attempted robbery at a Garden Grove adult business. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

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  • Suspects in a June 1 robbery of an adult business in Garden Grove. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

    Suspects in a June 1 robbery of an adult business in Garden Grove. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

  • Suspects in a June 1 robbery of an adult business in Garden Grove. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

    Suspects in a June 1 robbery of an adult business in Garden Grove. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

  • A suspect in robberies at a Garden Grove adult business is a woman believed to be a lookout with tatoos on her legs. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

    A suspect in robberies at a Garden Grove adult business is a woman believed to be a lookout with tatoos on her legs. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

  • A suspect in a June 1 robbery of an adult business in Garden Grove. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

    A suspect in a June 1 robbery of an adult business in Garden Grove. Photo courtesy Garden Grove Police Department.

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During the June 1 robbery, surveillance video shows a man in a black beanie and black jacket loitering in front of the business and standing next to a woman who police believe may have acted as a lookout, police said. The man then went inside, threatened the clerk with the gun, took money and fled.

The attempted robbery happened June 12 when another suspect covered his face with a black hoodie and threatened the clerk with a handgun, police said. The suspect fled the store without any cash, police said.

The suspects include two Latino men who appear to be 25-to-30 years old and who have visible tattoos. The other suspect is a 25-to-30-year-old woman who served as the lookout, police said. She was wearing prescription glasses and has visible tattoos on her legs, police said.

The suspects in the video are considered armed and dangerous, police said.

Anyone with information is urged to call detective Jim Franks at 714-741-5836.

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Slow-speed car chase in San Fernando Valley ends in Encino

RESEDA — A man suspected of stealing a car and DUI is in custody today after allegedly leading police on a slow-speed chase through the San Fernando Valley that included at least nine PIT maneuvers and four spike strips deployed by officers, as well as attempts by the public to stop the chase.

The driver was first spotted near the intersection of Tampa Avenue and Van Owen Street around 10:15 p.m. Thursday, according to Los Angeles Police Department Officer Norma Eisenman with the Media Relations Section.

The suspect made his way slowly through Van Nuys, Reseda, Winnetka, Encino and Sherman Oaks, before returning to Encino where the pursuit ended about 11:45 p.m. on Ventura Boulevard near Woodley Avenue after police performed a PIT maneuver and boxed the car in.

At one point during the pursuit, officers pulled back and other drivers tried to stop the suspect’s vehicle, including one person who kicked the suspect’s car and another who got out of his car and tried to open the suspect’s car door.

Throughout the pursuit, the driver continued to stop at traffic lights and used his traffic signals, while waving his left hand out the window.

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Man behind Paris knife attack born in Chechnya, French official says

PARIS – A French judicial official says the man behind a deadly knife attack Saturday night, May 12 in central Paris was born in Chechnya in 1997, and his parents have been detained.

The official said Sunday, May 13 that the assailant had French nationality but was born in the Russian republic. The official, who wasn’t authorized to be publicly named, provided no other information on the attacker’s identity.

The French interior minister is holding a special security meeting Sunday to address the attack, which was claimed by the Islamic State group.

The assailant killed a 29-year-old man and injured four others in a lively neighborhood near Paris’ famed Opera Garnier before he was killed by police.

Counterterrorism authorities took charge of the investigation, and President Emmanuel Macron vowed that France would not bow to extremists despite being the target of multiple deadly attacks in recent years.

Paris police officers evacuated people from some buildings in the Right Bank neighborhood after the attack, which happened on rue Monsigny at about 9 p.m. (1900 GMT.) Bar patrons and opera-goers described surprise and confusion in the immediate area.

Beyond the police cordon, however, crowds still filled nearby cafes and the city’s night ife resumed its normal pace soon after the attack.

Prosecutor Francois Molins said counterterrorism authorities are leading the investigation on potential charges of murder and attempted murder in connection with terrorist motives.

“At this stage, based on the one hand on the account of witnesses who said the attacker cried ‘Allahu akbar’ (God is great in Arabic) while attacking passersby with a knife, and given the modus operandi, we have turned this over to the counterterrorist section of the Paris prosecutor’s office,” Molins told reporters from the scene.

The Islamic State group’s Aamaq news agency said in a statement early Sunday that the assailant carried out the attack in response to the group’s calls for supporters to target members of the U.S.-led military coalition squeezing the extremists out of Iraq and Syria.

The Aamaq statement did not provide evidence for its claim or details on the assailant’s identity.

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