Disneyland sells out of top-priced Magic Key annual pass

Disneyland has sold out of the top-priced Magic Key after just two months as complaints from angry passholders continue to echo throughout social media about the widespread lack of reservations available for the $1,399 pass with no blockout dates.

The Dream Key has proven very popular and is currently sold out with the other Magic Keys — the Believe Key, Enchant Key and Imagine Key — remaining on sale at this time, according to Disneyland.

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Disneyland will continue to monitor the Believe Key, Enchant Key and Imagine Key and make adjustments as needed to deliver a great guest experience, according to Disneyland officials.

All Disneyland keyholders who purchased a Magic Key — including current Dream Key holders — will continue to have access to passholder holder benefits like the Magic Key terrace, specialty merchandise, select discounts and the upcoming Magic Key month.

READ MORE: Disneyland raises prices for most types of tickets

The new Magic Key annual passes went on sale Aug. 25 with Disneyland offering a free swag box for new keyholders who purchase a pass during the first 66 days — in honor of the park’s 66th anniversary. The $1,399 Dream Key sold out before reaching the end of the 66-day initial sales drive.

Prices for the new Magic Key annual passes range from $399 for the Imagine Key with the most blockout dates to $1,399 for the Dream Key with no blockout dates. The highest-priced Magic Key still available is now the $949 Believe Key with the Enchant Key costing $649.

Magic Key reservations have been frequently unavailable on weekends and holidays through the end of the year and near-term dates stretching for weeks have been completely “sold out” to annual passholders still looking for a reservation. In contrast, the daily ticket calendar often shows availability on virtually all weekdays, weekends and holidays — with a few near-term dates “sold out.”

READ MORE: Disneyland parking trams to return in early 2022

Disneyland’s loyal fan base has grown increasingly furious over the apparent prioritization of daily ticket buyers over annual passholders.

“The Dream Key is more like a Nightmare Key,” Jane Friday wrote on Instagram. “It’s an unbelievable amount of money to spend to have nothing but weekday reservations available.”

The separate Magic Key and daily ticket online calendars are dynamic and constantly changing — which means unavailable reservations can become available again at any time.

Last year’s closure and the launch of the new Magic Key program are generating strong demand during the always popular limited-time fall and winter holiday seasons, according to Disneyland officials.

The vast majority of keyholders say they are able to get just as much if not more access to the parks than they expected when they signed up, according to Disneyland officials.

​​Disneyland is managing attendance by leveraging its theme park reservation system that requires advance reservations for Magic Key holders and day guests to help provide a great guest experience for all and spread out visitation, according to Disney officials.

Keyholders can visit either Disneyland or DCA any day their passes are not blocked out and reservations are available. Keyholders can make two, four or six reservations at a time in a 90-day window depending on their pass type.

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Disneyland raises ticket prices for most types of admission

Disneyland has raised prices on most single and multi-day tickets after admission costs remained unchanged during the initial six-month phased reopening from an extended COVID-19 closure of the Anaheim theme park.

Ticket prices for Disneyland and Disney California Adventure increased an average of 6% on Monday, Oct. 25 with some single-park, parkhopper and multi-day tickets climbing more than 8%. The lowest-priced one-day single park ticket remained unchanged from 2019 at $104.

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A sixth tier was added to Disneyland’s former five-tier pricing system — raising the top price for a single-day, single park ticket from $154 to $164 and the most expensive parkhopper ticket from $209 to $224.

Single-day, single park ticket prices increased 0% to 8.1%: Tier 1 ($104), Tier 2 ($119), Tier 3 ($134), Tier 4 ($149), Tier 5 ($159) and Tier 6 ($164).

Parkhopper tickets rose 3.1% to 8.4%: Tier 1 ($164), Tier 2 ($179), Tier 3 ($194), Tier 4 ($209), Tier 5 ($219) and Tier 6 ($224). Parkhopper tickets provide admission to both Disneyland and Disney California Adventure on the same day.

READ MORE: Top-priced Dream Key annual pass sells out

Multi-day tickets saw similar spikes. Two-day, one-park tickets rose to $255 (from $235) while two-day parkhoppers climbed to $315 (from $290). Three-day tickets now cost $330 for single park per day access and $390 for the parkhopper.

The daily theme park parking rates also rose from $25 to $30. Self parking at the Disneyland resort’s three hotels also climbed from $25 to $40. Hotel valet parking jumped from $35 to $50.

Disneyland did not raise ticket prices when the Anaheim theme parks reopened April 30 after a 412-day coronavirus closure. Disneyland last raised ticket and annual pass prices in February 2020.

Since 2000, the price of admission to Disneyland has nearly quadrupled from $43 to $164, the new single-day ticket price on the park’s busiest days.

READ MORE: Disneyland parking trams to return in early 2022

With the latest increases, Disneyland continues to use ticket pricing to manage attendance and spread visits from peak periods to slower times of the year.

Starting in 2016, Disneyland switched to a demand-based pricing system with tickets divided into “value,” “regular” and “peak” days. Disneyland moved from a three-tier to a five-tier pricing system in 2020. The new Tier 1-6 system moves Disney closer to a dynamic pricing model designed to spread visitors throughout the year — away from busier days during the peak season to slower days in the off season. The Disney parks will employ the Tier 1 pricing on the slowest days of the year and Tier 6 pricing on the busiest days.

The first Tier 6 pricing days are not expected to appear on the Disneyland and DCA calendars until March 2022.

Disney ticket price increases typically have a ripple effect, with theme parks like Universal Studios, SeaWorld and Knott’s Berry Farm raising admissions soon after to keep pace with the industry leader.

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Oregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event

Oregon Ducks football players visiting Disneyland for a Rose Bowl event ended up getting stuck on a roller coaster during their first ride of the day at the Anaheim theme park resort.

University of Oregon football players were temporarily stranded on the Incredicoaster at Disney California Adventure on Thursday, Dec. 26 while visiting the park during a Rose Bowl pre-game media event, according to 24/7 Sports.

The Incredicoaster at Disney California Adventure experienced a brief downtime on Thursday, Disneyland officials said.

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The Oregon Ducks and the Wisconsin Badgers made the trip from Pasadena to Disneyland to be honored for playing in the 106th Rose Bowl Game. The No. 6 ranked Ducks and the No. 8 Badgers will square off on Jan. 1 at the Rose Bowl.

The first ride of the day at the Disneyland Resort wasn’t quite as fun as the Ducks players had hoped it would be.

Oregon linebacker Mase Funa posted video to social media of himself and fellow teammates temporarily stranded on the Incredicoaster after the ride broke down on a hill covered by the attraction’s distinctive noise-reducing “scream tubes.”

“Stuck on our first ride,” Funa posted on his Instagram account with a skull emoji.

A Disney cast member can be seen standing on the stairs next to the Incredicoaster track speaking to the stranded riders in the video posted by Funa, a former Mater Dei High School football player.

Fellow Oregon linebacker Ge’mon Eaford also posted video to his Instagram live feed of himself and Ducks teammates stuck in a separate Incredicoaster train.

“I thought it was over with,” Eaford said in the Instagram video.

It was unknown how long the Ducks players were stranded on the coaster, according to 24/7 Sports.

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