Photos: Turbulent day careens into a violent night in Southern California

During the day, some protests proved boisterous and passionate. Others turned turbulent, confrontational and violent. And much of the chaos endured into the evening as lawlessness ruled after dark in scattered communities around Southern California.

  • A large building burns along Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Looters leap out the broken window of Walgreens after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

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  • A looter walks away with goods from a store along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Several hundred protesters threw fireworks and other explosives Saturday night at police while marching in Santa Ana, walking into traffic and shouting “black lives matter” in remembrance of George Floyd. (Photo by Mindy Schauer.Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A lone demonstrator kneels in front of LAPD officers as they stand their ground in front of their headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Police form a blockade as a large building burns along Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march off of the southbound 71 Freeway on the Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • LAPD arrest a man along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A couple waits to be processed and arrested by police along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march off of the southbound 71 Freeway on the Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A firework is setoff as demonstrators march on the on the southbound 71 Freeway towards Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators vent to police in riot gear during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in front of the Pomona Police station in Pomona on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A man in Santa Ana on Saturday night pushes a cart full of burning paper toward police, who responded by firing pepper balls. (Eric Licas/Southern California News Group)

  • A looted Sephora store in the Grove Shopping center in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A woman waits to be processed and arrested by police along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Workers board up Susie Cakes on 9th and Hope as dusk falls in a chaotic Dowtown Los Angeles on Saturday. Photo: Bradley Bermont

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of the LA Times building in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Looters grab goods from a store along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of store fronts across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • A looted Apple store in the Grove Shopping center in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A protester in Santa Ana kicks a flaming garbage can down Bristol in Santa Ana on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Protesters in Santa Ana hurl fireworks at police on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators look on as artist Celos paints a mural of George Floyd along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A man looks at mannequins tossed from a window as demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD officers guard the headquarters as protestors make their way up the street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters leap out the broken window of Walgreens after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD confronts a man that doesn’t want to follow directions along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A looter breaks into a store and runs out with clothing front across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • A man in wheel chair rides past LAPD officers as they guard Broadway along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a Jewelry store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD arrest a man along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD officers point non lethal weapons at protestors along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Highway Patrol officers inspect the California Bear bank along 3rd after a break in after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD point non lethal weapons at protestors in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators look on as artist Celos paints a mural of George Floyd along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators graffiti’s a wall in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators block a street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators graffiti in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of the LA Times building in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD prepares to fire on Demonstrator as they break glass out of store fronts across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators hold up their hands as LAPD blocks the street along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A demonstrator opens up a fire extinguisher along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a Jewelry store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest past City Hall death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest past City Hall death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Store owners mark the store front “Don’t Touch, Black Owners” along 2nd street after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A LAPD helicopter flies over downtown in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators hold signs and scream toward LAPD officers across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD comes out in force along Broadway as looters breaking stores after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Demonstrators drives past the Million Dollar theatre where it reads Stay Strong LA along Broadway and 3rd Street after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators walk past LAPD officers guarding the headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators walk past LAPD officers guarding the headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • An LAPD officer stands guard along San Pedro Street as a man wearing a mask sits on the curb after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march along 2nd street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators block 5th street in front of the LAPD after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

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Spurred by the death of George Floyd, a Minnesota black man who died during a violent arrest, mammoth demonstrations rolled out for the fourth straight day in about a dozen communities around the Southland on Saturday, May 30. After dark — despite curfews installed by Los Angeles and other communities — clusters of looters smashed windows, robbed retail venues and set fires as law enforcement tried to keep pace.

 

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Nominate a company, organization for Top Workplaces 2020

The Orange County Register has launched its 13th annual Top Workplaces program for 2020.

Last year, 1,780 companies and organizations participated and 191 were invited to join the survey to determine Top Workplaces. In the end, 140 were chosen as the best of the best in Orange County.

Last year’s top winners were Seven Gables Real Estate, Marque Medical and Sidepath. You can check out all of the 2019 honorees here.

So, what kind of company, nonprofit or organization is eligible to participate?

  • Any organization with 35 or more employees in Orange County is eligible to participate (can be public, private, non-profit, government)
  • Workplaces are evaluated by their employees using a short 24-question survey.
  • Companies will be surveyed from June through August.

Energage, the research partner for the project, conducts Top Workplaces surveys for 50 major metro newspapers and surveyed more than 2 million employees at more than 7,000 organizations in 2019.

Dates, numbers to remember:

  • The nomination deadline is July 17
  • A magazine will be printed in December
  • To nominate online, go to ocregister.com/nominate
  • To nominate by phone, call  714-442-2768

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Protests, some violent, spread nationally in wake of George Floyd death

By SUDHIN THANAWALA The Associated Press

ATLANTA >> Demonstrators marched, stopped traffic and in some cases lashed out violently at police as protests erupted Friday in dozens of U.S. cities following the killing of George Floyd after a white officer pressed a knee into his neck while taking him into custody in Minnesota. In Phoenix, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and beyond, thousands of protesters carried signs that said: “He said I can’t breathe. Justice for George.” They chanted “”No justice, no peace” and “Say his name. George Floyd.”

After hours of peaceful protest in downtown Atlanta, some demonstrators suddenly turned violent, smashing police cars, setting one on fire, spray-painting the iconic logo sign at CNN headquarters, and breaking into a restaurant. The crowd pelted officers with bottles, chanting “Quit your jobs.”

At least three officers were hurt and there were multiple arrests, Atlanta police spokesman Carlos Campos said. Campos said protesters shot BB guns at officers and threw bricks, bottles and knives at them. People watched the scene from rooftops, some laughing as skirmishes broke out.

Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms passionately addressed the protesters at a news conference: “This is not a protest. This is not in the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr.”

“You are disgracing our city,” she told protesters. “You are disgracing the life of George Floyd and every other person who has been killed in this country. We are better than this. We are better than this as a city. We are better than this as a country. Go home, go home.”

Bottoms was flanked by rappers T.I. and Killer Mike, as well as King’s daughter, Bernice King.

Killer Mike cried as he spoke.

“We have to be better than this moment. We have to be better than burning down our own homes. Because if we lose Atlanta what have we got?” he said.

After Mayor Bottoms appealed for calm, the violence continued. More cars were set on fire, a Starbucks was smashed up, the windows of the College Football Hall of Fame were broken, and the iconic Omni Hotel was vandalized.

Protesters gathered outside the White House, with President Donald Trump inside, and some tried to push through barriers set up by the U.S. Secret Service along Pennsylvania Avenue.

In Minneapolis, a curfew did little to stop protesters and others from gathering in several areas of the city, including the battered Lake Street neighborhood where a police precinct was burned the night before. There were scattered small fires and some stores in a strip mall were being broken into near the city’s 5th Precinct.

An initially peaceful demonstration in New York City spiraled into chaos as night fell, as protesters skirmished with officers, destroyed police vehicles and set fires.

In Brooklyn, activists who had marched from Manhattan chanted insults at officers lined up outside the Barclays Center and pelted them with water bottles. Police sprayed an eye-irritating chemical into the largely diverse crowd multiple times, then cleared the plaza.

Video posted to social media showed officers using batons and shoving protesters down as they took people into custody and cleared streets.

Demonstrators rocked a police van, set it ablaze, then scrawled graffiti across its charred hulk and set it on fire a second time as officers retreated from the area. Blocks away, protesters used a club to batter another police vehicle.

Numerous people were arrested and police brought in buses to carry off those they arrested.

“We have a long night ahead of us in Brooklyn,” Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted. “Our sole focus is deescalating this situation and getting people home safe. There will be a full review of what happened tonight. We don’t ever want to see another night like this.”

The police department said numerous officers were injured, including one who had a tooth knocked out.

The names of black people killed by police, including Floyd and Eric Garner, who died on Staten Island in 2014, were on signs carried by those in the crowd, and in their chants.

“It’s my duty to be out here,” said Brianna Petrisko, among those at Foley Square in lower Manhattan, where most were wearing masks amid the coronavirus pandemic. “Our country has a sickness. We have to be out here. This is the only way we’re going to be heard.”

In Houston, where George Floyd grew up, several thousand people rallied in front of City Hall. Among them was 19-year-old Jimmy Ohaz, who came from the nearby city of Richmond, Texas.

“My question is how many more, how many more? I just want to live in a future where we all live in harmony and we’re not oppressed.”

Tensions rose in several West Coast cities as night fell.

About 1,000 protesters gathered in Oakland at a demonstration billed on social media as a rally to “F(asterisk)(asterisk)(asterisk) the police,” and some windows were smashed.

Demonstrators shut down a freeway in Los Angeles amid isolated scuffles with police that ended in a few protesters detained and one officer receiving medical treatment, police said. An LAPD vehicle had its windows smashed, and CNN reported that someone wrote “killer” on a patrol car.

Protesters repeatedly clashed with police in the Silicon Valley city of San Jose, said Mayor Sam Liccardo, and police responded with flash-bang grenades and rubber bullets. One officer was being treated at a hospital for an injury that was not life-threatening, he and police officials said.

Liccardo said his own officers shared the community’s outrage over Floyd’s in-custody death.

“It was a horrible injustice. I’d venture to guess that every police officer out there feels much of the same anger about what happened in Minneapolis,” he told The Associated Press.

Thirty miles to the west, Santa Cruz police chief Andrew G. Mills said in a statement that the actions by Minneapolis officers in Floyd’s death “are the antithesis of what we view as good policing.”

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Police make arrests in Fontana during protest over George Floyd’s death

A protest Thursday night in Fontana over the death of George Floyd resulted in several vandalism-related arrests, according to the police department.

Floyd, a 46-year-old man from Minnesota, died on Monday after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck. Floyd’s death has sparked protests against police violence throughout the country.

Protesters gathered on Sierra Avenue, between Arrow Boulevard and Ceres Avenue at around 6 p.m., according to reports from social media. The protesters carried signs that said “Black Lives Matter” and signs with Floyd’s name.

A group of ppl gathered near #Fontana City Hall to protest the death of #GeorgeFloyd and support #BlackLivesMatter near Sierra Ave (a main street in the city). pic.twitter.com/OBg15IflNm

— Natalya Estrada (@Nat_Estrada44) May 29, 2020

Social media reports indicated that Fontana police attempted to break up the gathering of protestors, and eventually crowd control measures were used to make the crowds disperse.

Fontana police said several vandalism arrests were made, but there were no injuries to either protestors or police.

The @FontanaPD is trying to disperse the crowd pic.twitter.com/J8sgjxWfNf

— AlexVnews (@alexvnews) May 29, 2020

The protest was over as of 11 p.m., police said.

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South Coast Plaza reopens Monday, June 1 with most amenities shut

  • The carousel at South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa will remain closed even as the retail center reopens June 1. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer)

  • South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa is void of customers after a rise in COVID-19 cases on Monday, March 16, 2020. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer)

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  • South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa is void of customers after a rise in COVID-19 cases on Monday, March 16, 2020. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer)

  • South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa lacks customers after a rise in COVID-19 cases on Monday, March 16, 2020. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer)

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The giant South Coast Plaza retail center will reopen Monday, June 1 with limited hours and many of its amenities sidelined to ease shoppers’ concerns about the novel coronavirus.

The Costa Mesa center quietly announced details of the reopening on its webpage late Thursday, May 28. California’s easing of stay-at-home orders now allows indoor malls to open. The mall closed March 16 after learning a store employee had contracted the virus.

“The health and safety of everyone in the shopping center is our top priority,” the South Coast Plaza’s website states.

The center’s plan gives shoppers a preview of what mall life could be like in the pandemic era.

Operating hours have been shortened, beginning at 11 a.m. and closing at 7 pm, Monday through Saturday, and noon to 7 p.m. on Sundays.

Customers are advised to check individual shops and restaurants to see which ones would be open. Many indoor malls have reopened their shopping halls in the past week, but many merchants were not yet ready for business.

Visitors to South Coast Plaza should bring a face covering or mask. It’s required in the parking lots, to enter the mall and in stores. Costa Mesa and the county both require masks at most indoor facilities open to the public. The mall will offer free masks to customers who need one.

How South Coast Plaza handles its reopening will be carefully watched in the shopping center industry. The mall, which caters to high-end shoppers, is known to be a cutting-edge provider of customer service.

For example, South Coast Plaza’s reopening notice cited a new “state-of-the-art air treatment system” and intensified cleaning efforts, especially in high-touch areas. Hand sanitizer stations are placed in high traffic areas, and mall personnel will help manage social distancing along with signage encouraging visitors to keep 6-feet apart.

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Services such as valet parking and holding packages are shut, but the SCP2GO curbside pickup service remains active. Many common areas where the public gathered are closed, including the popular carousels.

The mall reopens in a tough environment for shopping centers. The pandemic has spooked shoppers — skittish about spending with record-high unemployment — and shattered the finances of many merchants — the folks who pay mall owners’ rents.

Real estate analysts at Green Street Advisors estimated mall operators nationwide collected about 25% of the rent they previously got and “collectability of unpaid rent will be tough.” That’s a key reason why the typical mall’s value has been cut by 25% this year.

It may not get better soon, Green Street wrote, as “retailer rent-paying ability could be impaired for years following this crisis.”

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Untangling the web we weave when Twitter tags elicit Trump threats

The First Amendment, social media, and the president became tangled up again Tuesday when Twitter for the first time tagged one of President Trump’s tweets as false and misleading.

Twitter added a link beneath a set of tweets about mail-in voting. The company urged users to “get the facts about mail-in ballots.” The link indicates there is no evidence of a correlation between voter fraud and mail-in ballots.

The president offered a variety of responses, including that the tag violated his free speech and that he might “shut down” or regulate Twitter.

Let me untangle this mess for you, one string at a time.

Twitter is a corporation and its content decisions are not First Amendment issues. If Twitter blocks, censors, or halts someone’s account, it is the equivalent of a grocery store removing a customer who is knocking down shelves and screaming at other patrons. As a private business, it controls its space, physical or virtual.

The First Amendment protects us from government regulation. The key word in this sentence is “government.” Since Twitter is not a government entity, it is not possible for it to violate the president’s First Amendment rights.

This brings me to the next matter. The president cannot shut down Twitter. This would be an enormous First Amendment issue. The president, as the most powerful government actor, cannot censor this or any tool for expression. The Supreme Court has long held that any government censorship “comes to this Court bearing a heavy presumption against its constitutional validity.”

In other words, the framers of the Constitution specifically sought to protect us from the government censoring our individual speech or that of publications, such as newspapers.

The Supreme Court, for better or worse, has also emphasized that corporations have human-like protections. Censoring or punishing a corporation’s speech is generally equivalent, in the Supreme Court’s eyes, to stopping an individual from speaking. This would be a flagrant First Amendment violation.

Next, can the president regulate social media? No. Congress, which has lawmaking powers that are not vested to the executive branch, could try. It’s past attempts to regulate online expression have failed. The Supreme Court has again and again struck down attempts to limit expression online.

The Supreme Court has generally concluded online expression is akin to the ideas about public participation and the exchange of ideas that were on the minds of the Constitution’s framers in the 18th century. For these reasons, justices have strongly supported protecting such spaces.

For similar reasons, the president also cannot block other Twitter users from following his account, seeing his posts, or commenting. A federal court ruled last summer that “the First Amendment does not permit a public official who utilizes a social media account for all manner of official purposes to exclude persons from an otherwise‐open online dialogue because they expressed views with which the official disagrees.”

So, what can the president do? He can do what any citizen does when they do not like a business or its practices. He can leave and not do business with Twitter any more. Alternatively, he can continue to use the tool to express his ideas.

It’s easy to forget social media platforms are private spaces. They are built to appear like public spaces, like a sidewalk or a city park. It is also reasonable to become concerned when social media platforms, which have garnered enormous power, choose to step into a discussion. If just three companies – Facebook, Google, and Twitter – chose to block a person or their ideas from their spaces, that person would, in many ways, disappear. They would be censored.

There is no legal recourse for these decisions, however. Nor is it likely there will ever be.

In fact, it is far more likely decisions like the one Twitter made Tuesday will become more common. Twitter has been developing and experimenting with policies for the the past several months that would curb misinformation and disinformation, as well as manipulated content.

Facebook has moved forward with an oversight board that will guide future content decisions. The company has also stepped into false and misleading content, taking down false information about COVID-19 cures and, more controversially, removing groups that protested stay-at-home orders.

Twitter did not remove the president’s post, which allows anyone who sees it to encounter the president’s ideas. The company instead added further information. Removing the post entirely would have halted that and been more of a concern.

Regardless, however, Twitter’s decision was not a First Amendment concern. The president’s threats to regulate or shut down the corporation would be.

Jared Schroeder is an associate professor of journalism at Southern Methodist University, where he specializes in First Amendment law. He is the author of “The Press Clause and Digital Technology’s Fourth Wave.”

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Pedestrian dead after crash in Anaheim

One person died after a pedestrian-involved crash in Anaheim on Wednesday night.

The Anaheim Police Department said at around 10:30 p.m. that Beach Boulevard would be closed for several hours between Orange Avenue and Ball Road due to a crash involving a pedestrian.

Information on the pedestrian was not immediately available, but police said the person was hit and killed in the crash.

Police said the driver stayed at the scene after the crash, and police were investigating.

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Police seek driver of car that hit pedestrian while fleeing scene of Anaheim street takeover

Police sought the driver of a vehicle that struck a pedestrian while leaving the scene of a street takeover in Anaheim early Tuesday, May 26.

Dozens of people had assembled after midnight near Harbor Boulevard and Katella Avenue, where at least 15 vehicles were seen with their tires screeching as they skidded in circles through the intersection, Anaheim Police Sgt. Shane Carringer said. Authorities responded to break up the gathering, and a red coupe was seen in surveillance footage driving away from the scene as police approached.

Investigators believe the sports car struck a man who was standing in the street, then took off westbound on Katella, police said in a news release. The victim was taken to a  hospital and treated for injuries that were described as moderate, and was expected to recover, Carringer said.

The vehicle involved in the collision may have been a Scion FR-S or Subaru BRZ, police said. It did not have a license plate displayed on its front bumper, but may have had one on its dashboard.

Police asked anyone who might be able to help them track down either the vehicle or motorist involved in the crash to call APD Traffic Investigator Poer at 714-765-1474.

No other injuries or collisions were reported in connection with the street takeover, Carringer said.

“This one was actually on the smaller side compared to what we have seen,” Carringer said of the illegal  after hours gathering that preceded the crash. Similar events in Orange County and the illegal exhibitions of speed they feature have attracted hundreds of vehicles and people.

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It’s time for American economic heroes to shine: Ken Calvert

Our unalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness could not be denied by King George III. It’s now up to us to ensure they aren’t denied by COVID-19.

The deadly and highly infectious nature of COVID-19 is undeniable. It’s why we essentially shut down our economy overnight. To save lives, we took the disruptive steps needed to flatten the growth curve of the virus. Our pause gave health officials the time and space necessary – combined with resources provided by Congress – to increase hospital capacity, acquire essential medical supplies, develop and deploy tests, and improve treatments.

Given that time and space, our medical heroes stormed the beaches of the pandemic. While Americans shed tears of sorrow for the thousands we have lost to the virus, we simultaneously shed tears of pride for the selfless and courageous citizens who saved countless lives. Now, with flattening curves, more testing capacity, hospital capacity, and supplies on hand, we are in a stronger and safer position to responsibly ease restrictions on our economy.

As it has been from the pandemic’s early days, protecting the health of Americans must be an ever-present factor in our re-opening. We simply won’t flip a switch and resume our pre-COVID lives. Vulnerable individuals must continue to take extra precautions, masks will be worn, and high-density events will be some of the last activities to resume. Our post-COVID society is going to look a little different for a while – but that doesn’t have to be a bad thing.

We relied on our incredibly talented doctors, nurses, and scientists to confront the health crisis, now let’s rely on our incredibly talented entrepreneurs and business innovators to confront the economic crisis. Thankfully, it’s already happening. American free market ingenuity doesn’t need a green light from government – it just gets to work. Look at all of the restaurants and other small businesses in your community that had their normal operations totally disrupted but changed everything on a dime to find a way to stay open.

Many businesses didn’t have a choice and were forced to close their doors – but they didn’t shut down. Thanks to tech solutions like Zoom and other tools, companies have continued to work and, most importantly, have been conceptualizing their business model and functions in a post-pandemic economy.  Multi-national companies have already been putting new ideas in motion overseas in countries that are re-opening ahead of the United States. Tesla and Disney are just two major California employers that are already implementing new health safety procedures at their facilities in other countries. American workers will benefit from real-world lessons learned by these experiences.

Like anything, lifting our economic restrictions will be full of surprises – both good and bad. Where setbacks occur, we must act promptly and, if necessary, reinstate some restrictions to suppress new clusters. Unlike the early days of the pandemic, we are in a much better health posture to respond to communities who may experience spikes in the virus. Through compliance with public health guidelines and other safety advances, workplaces, restaurants, retail businesses, and other venues will be safer to visit from a health perspective than ever before.

The alternative to re-opening involves continuing our state of economic paralysis, more businesses closing up permanently and rising levels of jobless Americans beyond what we saw during the Great Depression.

Small businesses, entrepreneurs, independent contractors and many others have endured the economic burden of a shutdown only to be faced with a moving goal post on re-opening – from flattening the curve to finding the cure.  They will not survive a prolonged closure which will only mean more government intervention, more debt, and more loss of our way of life.  I want to build a society that’s safer, healthier, and stronger – not one that’s more dependent on the government.

As members of Congress, it is incumbent on us to lead the way forward to a new future that balances the health and safety of our citizens with the unmatched potential of our economic engine. I know America’s health care professionals and free market innovators are up to the challenge, as they always have been, and it’s time we let them do what they do best.

Ken Calvert is a former small business owner and currently represents California’s 42nd District in the U.S. House of Representatives.

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Police use drone to find a missing woman in Orange

Officials in Orange turned to a drone when a woman went missing on Monday, May 25.

Family members told police the elderly woman left with her dog on early Monday morning and had not been seen in three hours, according to the Orange Police Department’s Facebook page.

Happy to report her and her dog are recovering well. pic.twitter.com/0n3JCAHY1j

— Orange Police Department (California) (@CityOfOrangePD) May 25, 2020

Officers responded to a call at 11:42 a.m. to the area of 5100 East Henley Pl. and shortly called in a drone operator to check the hillside of Via Escola near Weston Street, officials said.

During the search, officers located the woman lying on the ground, concealed within large brush, Her dog was by her side.

The Orange City Fire Department transported the woman to a nearby hospital for evaluation, officials said.

“We are happy to report the missing person and her dog are recovering and are in good condition,” officials with the Orange Police Department wrote in a Facebook post. “Great teamwork by everyone involved.”

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