U.S., Oregon in talks about pulling federal agents from Portland

By GILLIAN FLACCUS and ANDREW SELSKY and JONATHAN LEMIRE

PORTLAND, Ore.  — The Trump administration has started talks with the Oregon governor’s office and indicated that it would begin to draw down the presence of federal agents sent to quell two months of chaotic protests in Portland if the state stepped up its own enforcement, a senior White House official said Tuesday.

The official stressed to The Associated Press that the talks with the office of Democratic Gov. Kate Brown are in the early stages and there is no agreement. The official was not authorized to publicly discuss private conversations and spoke on the condition of anonymity.

Brown didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment Tuesday. Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler’s office also didn’t immediately respond to an email.

Meanwhile, law enforcement officers again used tear gas to disperse protesters early Wednesday on the streets of Portland as loud booms filled the air.

Just a day earlier, the U.S. Marshals Service and Department of Homeland Security were weighing whether to send in more agents. The marshals were taking steps to identify up to 100 additional personnel who could go in case they were needed to relieve or supplement the deputy marshals who work in Oregon, spokesman Drew Wade said.

Homeland Security was considering a similar measure with Customs and Border Protection agents, according to an administration official with direct knowledge of the plans who was not authorized to speak publicly about the plans and spoke to AP on condition of anonymity.

President Donald Trump did not let up on criticizing local authorities in their handling of the protests that began after George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police and have grown to include the presence of federal agents in Portland and other Democratic cities.

The nightly protests often spiral into violence as demonstrators target the U.S. courthouse in Oregon’s largest city with rocks, fireworks and laser pointers and federal agents respond with tear gas, less-lethal ammunition and arrests.

“We, as you know, have done an excellent job of watching over Portland and watching our courthouse where they wanted to burn it down, they’re anarchists, nothing short of anarchist agitators,” Trump said Tuesday. “And we have protected it very powerfully. And if we didn’t go there, I will tell you, you wouldn’t have a courthouse. You’d have a billion-dollar burned-out building.”

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan said Tuesday that she had received confirmation that U.S. agents had left her city after being sent to Seattle last week to protect federal buildings amid lingering unrest.

The developments came as the American Civil Liberties Union in Oregon filed a motion alleging that the militarized U.S. agents are attacking journalists and legal observers with riot-control munitions, despite a federal court ordering them to stop.

Last week, the U.S. District Court in Portland — located in the same federal court building that’s been the focus of protests — temporarily blocked federal officers from targeting journalists and legal observers at the protests.

The ACLU asked the court to sanction and hold in contempt federal agents for violating the temporary restraining order. It also asked the court to order Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf and Acting Deputy Secretary Ken Cuccinelli to personally appear and show why they should not be sanctioned for contempt.

The organization cited numerous instances in which agents have violated the order by firing impact munitions and using pepper spray against people clearly marked as journalists or legal observers.

The motion was filed after U.S. Attorney General William Barr defended the aggressive federal response to Congress, saying “violent rioters and anarchists have hijacked legitimate protests” sparked by Floyd’s death.

The ACLU accused federal agents of acting unlawfully in Portland.

“This administration claims to be defending the federal courthouse, but won’t obey the orders coming out of it. What purpose are these agents actually serving then?” said Kelly Simon, interim legal director of the ACLU of Oregon.

One journalist, Jonathan Levinson of Oregon Public Broadcasting, said in a statement to the court that while he was trying to take a photograph Friday, he saw a federal agent raise his weapon, aim it at him and fire several rounds.

“My camera and lens were splattered with paint,” Levinson said. “Based on my position and the position of people around me, there is almost no chance the agent was aiming at anyone other than me.”

Levinson, who has covered conflicts worldwide and was deployed to Iraq as an Army officer, said he was wearing a press pass and a helmet that says “PRESS” in big letters on the front and back.

Kat Mahoney, a legal observer with the ACLU, said a federal agent fired a paintball at her, hitting her in the head Friday. The next night, an agent sprayed her and three other observers in the face as they told him they were legal observers and pointed to their credentials.

There was no immediate comment from the federal agencies on the motion and accusations.

Two groups also have sued the Department of Homeland Security, alleging it violated the Constitution by sending federal law enforcement to disperse crowds with tear gas and rubber bullets.

The agency did not immediately respond to a request for comment about the lawsuit from the Wall of Moms — a group of self-described mothers — and the Don’t Shoot Portland group.

Members of the group of mothers have “been tear-gassed night after night, left vomiting and unable to eat or sleep because of the toxic poison blasted at them,” the lawsuit said.

Wheeler and City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty had asked Wolf on Monday for a meeting to discuss a cease-fire and their desire for the removal of the extra federal agents deployed to Portland.

The same day, U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams insisted that the agents will remain as long as protesters keep attacking the Mark O. Hatfield Federal Courthouse.

Protesters have tried almost every night to tear down a fence erected to protect the building, set fires in the street and hurled fireworks, Molotov cocktails and bricks, rocks and bottles at the agents inside.

On the 60th night of protests, demonstrators near the courthouse were met with tear gas, pepper balls and stun grenades fired by agents early Tuesday.

Lemire reported from Washington. Selsky reported from Salem, Oregon. Associated Press writers Mike Balsamo and Colleen Long in Washington and Suman Naishadham in Atlanta also contributed to this report.

 

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George Floyd protest held as President Trump is celebrated in separate O.C. events

About 100 protesters gathered in support of the Black Lives Matter campaign in Huntington Beach on Sunday, June 14 — also the day dozens of bicyclists rode from that city to Newport Beach to celebrate President Donald Trump’s birthday.

Both events were peaceful, and neither resulted in any reports of altercations or arrests, Newport Beach police officials said. The two groups did not gather at the same time.

  • Laurence Geronilla, 19, of Panorama City, takes part in a protest against racism and police violence at Huntington Beach Pier Sunday, June 14 (Eric Licas, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Demonstrtors gather in support of the Black Lives Matter campaign at Huntington Beach Pier Sunday, June 14. (Eric Licas, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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  • Michelle Hattersley, 18, of Huntington Beach, collects hand written letters addressed to Huntington Beach City Hall from demonstrators gathered in support of the Black Lives Matter campaign at Huntington Beach Pier Sunday, June 14. She said she believes counterprotesters opposed to the BLM movement present at earlier events “fly in the face” of the core values of her hometown. (Eric Licas, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A Huntington Beach Police sergeant asks a man to walk with him and talk after he shouted “all lives matter” at a group of about 100 protesters gathered in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter campaign at Huntington Beach Pier Sunday, June 14. (Eric Licas, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Timothy Harvey, 31, of Aliso Viejo, joins a group of roughly 100 people demonstrating against racism and police violence at Huntington Beach Pier Sunday, June 14. (Eric Licas, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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Demonstrators outraged by incidents of excessive force by police and the in-custody deaths of unarmed black people nationwide started gathering at  Huntington Beach Pier at about 2 p.m. What began as a small crowd swelled to include about 100 people by 4 p.m.

The event was dwarfed by a protest held in Los Angeles County that had attracted thousands of people. It was also smaller than similar demonstrations held at Huntington Beach Pier over the past few weeks. However, some traveled more than an hour to take part in the protest.

“I feel like there’s enough people in LA now,” Panorama City resident Laurence Geronilla, 19, said. “My presence might make more of a difference here.”

Chris Pyon, 29, of Anaheim, holds a sign wishing a happy birthday to Bryce James, son of LeBron James. “I think we all know it’s someone else’s birthday too. But I think the James family has done more to uplift people than the current administration.” @ocregister pic.twitter.com/59nVFWVSK4

— Eric Anthony Licas (@EricLicas) June 14, 2020

Earlier gatherings at the pier had been accompanied by pro-law enforcement counter protests. However, those expressing support for the Black Lives Matter campaign did not encounter significant opposition on Sunday.

“There is nothing to counter-protest. There is nothing for them to be out here for,” Aliso Viejo resident Timothy Harvey, 31, said. “Because what we are protesting, is there are still people in this world that believe black lives don’t matter at all, and that’s not OK.”

Earlier, several dozen riders celebrating Flag Day and the president’s birthday assembled at Huntington Beach Pier at about 11:30 a.m., Newport Beach Lt. Eric Little said. American flags and banners bearing the words “Trump  2020” were hoisted onto poles attached to bicycles, and fluttered behind participants as they rode to Balboa Pier. Photos taken along the way at Newport Pier showed at least 40 people who had been a part of the gathering.

Happy Birthday President Trump from Trump birthday bike riders 🇺🇸🇺🇸🙏🙏@realDonaldTrump @Geoclewis @CaliConserv1 @kimberleyUSA11 pic.twitter.com/l962Cp4EHA

— formal protest guy (@ProtestGuy) June 14, 2020

A peace and unity rally in Laguna Beach also took place Sunday. About 25 people joined the gathering, which was described as “completely peaceful,” by Laguna Beach Police Sgt. Jim Cota.

 

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California legislative leaders back state ‘sleeper hold’ ban

By DON THOMPSON

SACRAMENTO — California’s Assembly speaker and other key lawmakers on Monday backed making it illegal statewide for police to use a type of neck hold that blocks the flow of blood to the brain, a proposal that appears to go beyond any other state.

Major law enforcement groups did not immediately say if they would oppose the move, which comes after a different restraint used by Minneapolis police was blamed for the death of George Floyd, triggering ongoing nationwide protests.

However, the Los Angeles Police Department announced an immediate moratorium on the training and use of the hold until the civilian Board of Police Commissioners can review the issue. Police departments in suburban Pasadena and El Monte and in Santa Ana in Orange County also have suspended use of the technique.

Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon endorsed legislation that fellow Democratic Assemblyman Mike Gipson said he will amend to make it illegal to use chokeholds and a carotid artery restraint tactic to forcibly detain a suspect.

“We … have to change a culture of excessive force that seems to exist among some members of law enforcement,” Rendon said at a news conference. “This bill will end one brutal method that police use for restraining people.”

The method, also known as a sleeper hold, involves applying pressure to the sides of the neck with an arm. It can almost immediately block blood flow in the carotid arteries and render someone unconscious, but can cause serious injury or death if the blood flow is restricted too long.

“These methods and techniques are supposed to save lives, but they don’t — they take lives,” said Gipson.

Colorado and Illinois allow use of the hold only if police deem lethal force to be justified, said Amber Widgery, a criminal justice analyst with the National Conference of State Legislatures, while Tennessee allows its use if other means of restraint have been ineffective. Washington, D.C., bans a similar trachea hold but permits the carotid hold under circumstances where lethal force is allowed.

Other states use more general legal language, she said, and it’s not clear if California’s proposal will allow any exceptions because Gipson did not release the actual language of his bill.

Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday said he would sign Gipson’s bill if it is approved by lawmakers, and ordered the state’s police training program to stop teaching officers how to use the neck hold.

Congressional Democrats on Monday also introduced legislation aimed at reforming police practices, including by banning certain policing tactics including chokeholds.

Although the Legislature is controlled by Democrats, Sen. Scott Wiener said law enforcement reforms “are incredibly hard to move forward.” He also mentioned proposed legislation that would restrict when police can use rubber bullets.

The sleeper hold ban was backed Monday by Black, Latino, Asian-Pacific Islander, Jewish and LGBTQ legislative caucuses. Senate President Pro Tem Toni Atkins said in a statement that “it is now time to have a conversation to ban chokeholds and carotid artery restraints on a statewide level.”

The proposal is also supported by the California Medical Association because the holds “can be misapplied and botched easily,” said incoming President Dr. Lee Snook.

One problem is the holds can fatally aggravate underlying health issues, Snook said, something police can’t know about on the spur of the moment.

“It is a difficult procedure to do…but it is effective when applied effectively,” said Brian Marvel, president of the rank-and-file Peace Officers Research Association of California, which represents more than 77,000 individuals and 930 associations.

His association is likely to defer to organizations representing police chiefs and sheriffs that determine what methods officers and deputies are allowed to use.

The sheriffs’ association has not taken a position in part because it hasn’t seen the details, said spokesman Cory Salzillo. The chiefs’ association did not take a stance but said “painful examples” of use of force prompted chiefs across the state to in recent years “to develop strict guidelines on certain techniques, including the carotid restraint.”

Officers would still have a variety of tools to control suspects if the hold is banned, Marvel said, ranging from voice commands to night sticks, Tasers, pepper spray and firearms. Sen. Maria Elena Durazo, a bill co-author, said 23 California law enforcement agencies have already limited its use, several in the last week.

On Friday, San Jose Police Chief Eddie Garcia said his department still allows the carotid hold as a last option before lethal force. On Monday he said in a statement that his department already bans chokeholds — which he said are distinct from carotid holds. Chokeholds apply pressure from the front and stop the individual from breathing, while carotid holds are from the side.

Garcia said the department is updating the department’s polices including by making it clear that chokeholds can’t be applied using pressure with any body part including the knee. Floyd died after prolonged pressure on his neck from an officer’s knee.

Marvel urged California lawmakers to make it clear that police still can “do what they need to do to save themselves.” He said lawmakers should consider allowing its continued use in certain circumstances, for instance where police or air marshals have limited options to control a suspect aboard an airplane.

Gipson, a former police officer, was among lawmakers who said they hope other states will follow California’s lead in banning the hold.

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Orange County athletes speak out on social media against racism in wake of George Floyd death


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  • Mater Dei’s Devin Askew is the Orange County boys basketball player of the year for the 2019-20 season. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer)

  • Twin brothers Cassius, left, and Caine Savage on the football field at Western High School in Anaheim on Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019. The brothers signed letters of intent with San Diego State and Utah. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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  • Pitcher, Kylee Magee of Canyon is named to the 2019 Orange County All-County softball team. Magee is shown in Irvine on Tuesday, May 21, 2019. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Mater Dei Monarchs wide receiver Kyron Ware-Hudson (10) points to the sky after making a catch in the end zone for a touchdown against the St. John Bosco Braves during the first half of the 2019 CIF Southern Section Division 1 High School Football Championship game at Cerritos College in Norwalk, Calif. on Saturday November 30, 2019. (Photo by Raul Romero Jr, Contributing Photographer)

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Protests at community parks, in front of government buildings and on city streets aren’t the only places in Southern California that young people are expressing their feelings about the death of George Floyd, racism and equality in America.

Some of Orange County’s most well-known high school athletes have made their voices heard on social media since the unarmed Floyd died in Minneapolis at the hands of police on May 25.

Rosary point guard Asia Avinger, The Register’s player of the year in girls basketball for 2019-20, has been among the most vocal on her Instagram account.

The San Diego State signee recently shared with her more than 10,000 followers a video of a young girl tearful saying, “I could die from the color of my skin.”

“There is so much hate in the world that we live in and it’s so horrific that even children are starting to understand how cruel the real world is,” Avinger wrote on the post that included the hashtag BLACKLIVESMATTER.

“There is so much hurt, pain and anger that we are feeling due to discrimination and racism.

“It shouldn’t matter the color of our skin, we should be treated with respect and equality. … We need CHANGE and I pray everyday that things get better.”

Mater Dei point guard Devin Askew, The Register’s boys basketball player of the year this past season, posted a photo this week that looked like himself in a shirt that read, “I Can’t Breathe”, a rallying crying at many protests for Floyd.

Floyd’s death, while in police custody, has sparked nationwide unrest.

“We are all equal!” the Kentucky-bound Askew wrote to his more than 78,000 followers on Instagram. “We are one! Together we fight for what is right.”

Western All-County wide receiver/cornerback Caine Savage also encouraged unity in a post on Instagram on Wednesday.

“We are BLACK MEN! We build. We don’t tear down other BLACK MEN!” the Utah signee wrote to his more than 3,000 followers. “All too often, we men find it easier to criticize each other instead of building each other up. With all the negativity going around, let’s do something positive!”

Canyon All-County softball pitcher Kylee Magee shared on her Instagram stories a quote from UCLA softball’s Aaliyah Jordan posted to the Pac-12 Conference social media account.

“My blackness is not a joke and not something that will be ignored. If you can’t see that then there’s a problem,” the quote read.

Numerous Orange County athletes, including New York Jets quarterback Sam Darnold (San Clemente), posted black screens to their Instagram accounts Tuesday as part of #BlackOutTuesday, a social media trend and sign of solidarity against police brutality against African Americans.

Mater Dei wide receiver and Oregon commit Kyron Ware-Hudson posted a video to his Instagram stories of a peaceful protest in front of police and a quote from Colorado Rockies baseball player Ian Desmond.

“When you can’t say, ‘Black Lives Matter’ … To me, that’s you saying my life doesn’t matter. That’s what I hear and I can’t change that,” the quote from Desmond read.

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ACLU sues Los Angeles, LA County and San Bernardino to stop curfews

LOS ANGELES — Calling the curfews imposed throughout Southern California “draconian,” the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit Wednesday on behalf of Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles and individual journalists, protesters and others against Los Angeles, Los Angeles County and the city of San Bernardino.

The ACLU claims in the lawsuit filed in federal court in Los Angeles that the curfews are a violation of the First Amendment because they suppress all political protest in the evening hours and restricting movement outside of working hours is a violation of the Constitution’s protection of freedom of movement.

“The city and county of Los Angeles are attempting to use these curfews to suppress Black Lives Matter-L.A.’s right to protest,” Melina Abdullah, a co-founder of BLM-L.A., said.

“They are attempting to suppress our ability to fully mobilize and focus full attention on the true issue of concern in the protests — police violence against black people.”

Enforcement of an L.A. curfew was seen Wednesday night in Grand Park, across the street from Los Angeles City Hall in downtown Los Angeles.

About 11:20 p.m., @LASDHQ deputies began arresting members of the group, several at a time, and walked them over into the theee Sheriff’s Department busses parked in front of City Hall. pic.twitter.com/O9730zGW9L

— Jonah Valdez (@Jonahmv) June 4, 2020

A small group of about 120 people had remained after a crowd of about 4,000 protesters gradually thinned out after the city’s 9 p.m. curfew had gone into effect.

The small group staged a sit-in at the park in protest of the curfew, arguing that they were only there to exercise their First Amendment rights and should not be subject to arrest.

By about 11:20 p.m., Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputies closed in on the sitting group at Grand Park, which is owned by the county.

The group chanted, “Peaceful protest” with hands raised, as the deputies arrested the group, several at a time.

The ACLU lawsuit claims the curfews also prohibit journalists from being able to fully report their stories from the scenes of the protests.

“These unconstitutional curfews have suppressed a huge amount of important political protest activity and disrupted the lives of over 10 million people,” Ahilan Arulanantham, senior counsel of the ACLU SoCal, said. “The curfews must end now.”

LA County Sheriff Alex Villanueva has said curfews in the county will remain in effect until the protests end.

 

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Orange County athletes speak out on social media about racism, equality in wake of George Floyd death

Protests at community parks, in front of government buildings and on city streets aren’t the only places in Southern California that young people are expressing their feelings about the death of George Floyd and equality in America.

Some of Orange County’s most well-known high athletes also have made their voices heard on social media since the unarmed Floyd died in Minneapolis at the hands of police on May 25.

Rosary point guard Asia Avinger, The Register’s player of the year in girls basketball, has been among the most vocal on her Instgram account.

The San Diego State signee recently shared with her more than 10,000 followers a video of a young girl tearful saying, “I could die from the color of my sign.”

“There is so much hate in the world that we live in and it’s so horrific that even children are starting to understand how cruel the real world is,” Avinger wrote on the post that included the hashtag BLACKLIVESMATTER. “There is so much hurt, pain and anger that we are feeling due to discrimination and racism.

“It shouldn’t mater the color of our skin, we should be treated with respect and equality. … We need CHANGE and I pray everyday that things get better.”

Mater Dei point guard Devin Askew, The Register’s boys basketball player of the year, posted a photo this week that looked like himself in a shirt that read, “I Can’t Breathe”, a rallying crying at many protests for Floyd.

“We are all equal,” the Kentucky-bound Askew wrote to his more than 78,000 followers on Instgram. “We are one! Together we fight for what is right.”

Western All-County wide receiver/cornerback Caine Savage also encouraged unity in a post on Wednesday.

“We are BLACK MEN! We build. We don’t tear down other BLACK MEN,” the Utah signee wrote to his more than 3,000 Instagram followers. “All too often, we men find it easier to criticize each other instead of building each other up. With all the negative going around, let’s do something positive.”

Canyon All-County softball pitcher Kylee Magee shared on her Instgram stories a quote from UCLA softball’s Aaliyah Jordan posted to the Pac-12 Conference Instagram account.

“My blackness is not a joke and not something that will be ignored. If you can’t see that then there’s a problem,” the quote read.

Numerous Orange County athletes, including New York Jets quarterback Sam Darnold, posted black screens to their Instagram accounts Tuesday as part of #BlackOutTuesday, a social media trend and sign of solidarity against police brutality against African Americans.

Mater Dei wide receiver and Oregon commit Kyron Ware-Hudson posted a video to his Instagram stories of a peaceful protest in front of police and a quote from Colorado Rockies baseball player Ian Desmond.

“When you can’t say, ‘Black Lives Matter’ … To me, that’s you saying my life doesn’t matter. That’s what I hear and I can’t change that,” the quote read.

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Protests, looting continue in Southern California as new week begins

Protests for racial equality, woven between bouts of looting and vandalism by opportunists, continued Monday as Southern California residents started to pick up the pieces from a destructive weekend.

Monday marked the sixth day of nationwide unrest over the death of 46-year-old George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody. Floyd, who was accused of passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a corner convenience store, was killed when fired Officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for almost nine minutes.

Early in the day,.an autopsy carried out by independent experts hired by the man’s family declared Floyd died from “asphyxiation from sustained pressure” caused by the knee on his neck, putting the results at odds with that of the Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s Office, according to CNN.

Cities and counties across Southern California set curfews in some areas as early as 1 p.m. Monday as the National Guard and police departments attempted to avoid the looting and destruction experienced over the weekend.

Indeed, even before nightfall, some looters in Hollywood and Van Nuys were met with LAPD police officers and handcuffs. Police also arrested a man in Upland for allegedly brandishing a firearm during a demonstration, officials said.

President Donald Trump threatened to deploy military to the streets of American cities in response, saying he would send “thousands and thousands” of soldiers if governors did not shut down the protests. Trump called governors “weak” for not arresting people during a video conference call with state leaders, according to the Associated Press.

Sunday saw the largest number of arrests so far in Los Angeles County, including 700 in Los Angeles, 73 in Long Beach and more than 400 in Santa Monica. Vandalism and looting in Long Beach and Santa Monica left businesses destroyed in the three cities, including iconic destinations such as Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica and Pine Avenue and The Pike in Long Beach.

  • Black Lives Matter supporters hold a peaceful protest outside the Van Nuys Civic Center on Monday, June 1, 2020 to demand justice for George Floyd. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Protesters drive by a demonstration outside the Van Nuys Civic Center on Monday, June 1, 2020 where protesters were demanding justice for George Floyd. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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  • Protesters block an intersection and confront police in Anaheim on Monday, June 1, 2020. Hundreds gathered to protest a Minnesota police officer’s killing of an unarmed black man.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Hundreds of protesters gather in Anaheim in response to a Minnesota police officer’s killing of an unarmed black man.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Tommy Fullobe of Anaheim joins hundreds of protesters who gather in Anaheim in response to a Minnesota police officer’s killing of an unarmed black man.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Protesters clash with Riverside law enforcement Monday, June 1, 2020, in downtown Riverside after protesters failed to disperse during a protest for the death of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • LAPD guard firefighters as they mop up a fire that broke out in a strip mall at Haskel and Vanowen streets in Van Nuys, CA Monday, June 1, 2020. Looting erupted in the area after a peaceful George Floyd protest in Van Nuys, the cause of the fire is under investigation. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • SisterJohn Ellen Turner flashes a peace sign to protesters who pass St. Catherine’s Academy on Monday, June 1, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • “George Floyd!” was chanted in downtown Riverside as several hundred protests his death on Monday, June 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators in Westwood took to the streets on Monday, June 1, 2020, to protest police abuse in the wake of the George Floyd, a black man who died in the custody of Minneapolis police. (Photo by David Rosenfeld)

  • Demonstrators in Westwood took to the streets on Monday, June 1, 2020, to protest police abuse in the wake of the George Floyd, a black man who died in the custody of Minneapolis police. (Photo by David Rosenfeld)

  • Protesters take over the intersection of Victory and Van Nuys Boulevards on Monday, June 1, 2020 to demand justice for George Floyd in Van Nuys. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Protesters take over the intersection of Victory and Van Nuys Boulevards on Monday, June 1, 2020 to demand justice for George Floyd in Van Nuys. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A large group of protestors took over streets in Hollywood to protest the death of George Floyd Monday, June 1, 2020. The group started at Sunset and Vine and marched through Hollywood streets blocking traffic at times. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A large group of protestors took over streets in Hollywood to protest the death of George Floyd Monday, June 1, 2020. The group started at Sunset and Vine and marched through Hollywood streets blocking traffic at times. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A large group of protestors took over streets in Hollywood to protest the death of George Floyd Monday, June 1, 2020. The group started at Sunset and Vine and marched through Hollywood streets blocking traffic at times. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore apologized to business owners, saying his officers were overwhelmed by the “forces of those that wish to exact violence in the community.” The department tempered its response initially to avoid intimidating the peaceful protests, he said. Eighty-eight buildings on Melrose Avenue alone were destroyed, according to Moore.

Moore, along with other county law enforcement officials, pledged to scale up their presence with assistance from from the National Guard. Some 2,000 troops will have deployed in the city by Tuesday, June 2, Moore said. The police chiefs urged protesters to work with law enforcement and to call out anyone who uses the protests as an opportunity to loot and vandalize.

“We need that communication, because in the absence of it, we have to overwhelm,” Moore said. “We have to bring in resources that will appear to stifle the message.”

Residents and business owners started their week cleaning up broken glass and pillaged storefronts in Long Beach, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, San Bernardino and Hemet. Police chiefs in Santa Monica and Long Beach, in particular, took flak from residents who believed their departments did not do enough to protect property.

Jack Sarkissian, owner of Jack’s Jewelers in Santa Monica, said looters spent two hours in his store despite his calls to police.

“They just didn’t do anything,” he said, adding that the looters had “all the time they needed to get anything they needed.”

A petition calling for the removal of Santa Monica Police Chief Cynthia Renauld garnered more than 3,000 signatures as of Monday afternoon. Renauld at a press conference warned her department would catch those responsible for the coordinated looting at Santa Monica shops.

“We have been going through the city collecting that evidence. We have had our residents sending us videos and license plates,” Renauld said. “We’ll work through this one day at a time to ensure that we protect justice, civility and safety in the community, while still ensuring that right for people to talk to us through peaceful protest and the expression of what they’re feeling.”

Renauld said about 95 percent of those arrested in Santa Monica did not live in the city.

The protests in Southern California before nightfall Monday were largely peaceful, with small pockets of looting in some areas.

The movement spilled into the San Fernando Valley for the first time Monday with hundreds of peaceful protesters converging in Van Nuys at what was supposed to be a canceled event. Looters used the cover of the growing protest to hit businesses along Van Nuys Boulevard, reportedly raiding a Boost Mobile store, a dispensary and a pharmacy. At one point, some members of the crowd threw water bottles at officers guarding boarded up shops near the Civic Center.

Looters hit a jewelry store and CVS in Encino while protesters occupied police in other areas of the city.

Elsewhere, thousands of protesters gathered again in downtown Los Angeles, where some at City Hall yelled for National Guardsmen to “go home.”

Police fired rubbers bullets to try to disperse roughly 200 demonstrators blocking lanes on the 405 Freeway near UCLA in Westwood. The crowd left the freeway and splintered after being given a five-minute warning to leave the area.

The initial event was organized by the Student Activist Project at UCLA, which had actually tried to call off the event.

Others marched along Hollywood Boulevard carrying a sign that read “Say their names” and listing those who have died at the hands of police. The National Guard set up with Humvees in the area to try to contain the marchers, but there were no clashes as of Monday evening.

Police arrested looters in Van Nuys and at a Rite Aid in Hollywood later in the night.

Officers in Glendora kneeled alongside protesters for an eight-minute moment of silence as a sign of solidarity.

In Orange County, hundreds gathered in Anaheim’s La Palma Park in the first of three protests expected Monday. The protesters gathered in the grass and listened to speakers describing how police brutality had affected their lives.

“There’s a lot of people hoping you are going to lose your sanity and attack our city and we are here to prove them wrong,” a speaker said to the crowd, drawing loud cheers.

The protesters later merged with another group in front of Anaheim City Hall, but left as police enforced a 6 p.m. curfew.

In Riverside, more than 4,000 people protested peacefully against police violence. Many refused to leave once the 6 p.m. curfew rolled around. They clapped rhythmically as officers surrounded them and ordered them to disperse nearly an hour later.

Throughout Southern California, communities braced for another long night with businesses and civic buildings setting up barricades and police staging around potential targets for looters. In response to the looting over the weekend, Target announced it was temporarily shutting down stores across the nation, including 20 in Southern California. The retailer pledged to continue to pay workers’ salaries and benefits while the stores are closed.

Protesters laid on the ground and chanted “I Can’t Breathe” in West Covina near the 10 Freeway. Police closed off the entrances to the Eastland Center mall in advance.

Torrance’s Del Amo Fashion Center shut down early Monday and police officers blocked off the entrances using city buses.

San Bernardino County closed its offices and coronavirus testing sites early in the day to allow police to focus elsewhere.

Staff writers Nick Green, Ryan Carter, Pierce Singgih, David Rosenfield, Ruby Gonzales, Josh Cain, David Downey, Beau Yarbrough, Brian Whitehead, Jennifer Iyer, Kevin Smith, Hunter Lee, Olga Grigoryants, Ariella Plachta, Scott Schwebke, Jeong Park and Sean Emery contributed to this report.

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Photos: Turbulent day careens into a violent night in Southern California

During the day, some protests proved boisterous and passionate. Others turned turbulent, confrontational and violent. And much of the chaos endured into the evening as lawlessness ruled after dark in scattered communities around Southern California.

  • A large building burns along Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Looters leap out the broken window of Walgreens after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

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  • A looter walks away with goods from a store along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Several hundred protesters threw fireworks and other explosives Saturday night at police while marching in Santa Ana, walking into traffic and shouting “black lives matter” in remembrance of George Floyd. (Photo by Mindy Schauer.Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A lone demonstrator kneels in front of LAPD officers as they stand their ground in front of their headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Police form a blockade as a large building burns along Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march off of the southbound 71 Freeway on the Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • LAPD arrest a man along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A couple waits to be processed and arrested by police along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march off of the southbound 71 Freeway on the Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A firework is setoff as demonstrators march on the on the southbound 71 Freeway towards Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators vent to police in riot gear during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in front of the Pomona Police station in Pomona on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A man in Santa Ana on Saturday night pushes a cart full of burning paper toward police, who responded by firing pepper balls. (Eric Licas/Southern California News Group)

  • A looted Sephora store in the Grove Shopping center in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A woman waits to be processed and arrested by police along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Workers board up Susie Cakes on 9th and Hope as dusk falls in a chaotic Dowtown Los Angeles on Saturday. Photo: Bradley Bermont

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of the LA Times building in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Looters grab goods from a store along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of store fronts across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • A looted Apple store in the Grove Shopping center in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A protester in Santa Ana kicks a flaming garbage can down Bristol in Santa Ana on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Protesters in Santa Ana hurl fireworks at police on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators look on as artist Celos paints a mural of George Floyd along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A man looks at mannequins tossed from a window as demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD officers guard the headquarters as protestors make their way up the street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters leap out the broken window of Walgreens after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD confronts a man that doesn’t want to follow directions along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A looter breaks into a store and runs out with clothing front across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • A man in wheel chair rides past LAPD officers as they guard Broadway along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a Jewelry store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD arrest a man along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD officers point non lethal weapons at protestors along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Highway Patrol officers inspect the California Bear bank along 3rd after a break in after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD point non lethal weapons at protestors in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators look on as artist Celos paints a mural of George Floyd along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators graffiti’s a wall in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators block a street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators graffiti in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of the LA Times building in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD prepares to fire on Demonstrator as they break glass out of store fronts across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators hold up their hands as LAPD blocks the street along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A demonstrator opens up a fire extinguisher along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a Jewelry store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest past City Hall death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest past City Hall death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Store owners mark the store front “Don’t Touch, Black Owners” along 2nd street after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A LAPD helicopter flies over downtown in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators hold signs and scream toward LAPD officers across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD comes out in force along Broadway as looters breaking stores after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Demonstrators drives past the Million Dollar theatre where it reads Stay Strong LA along Broadway and 3rd Street after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators walk past LAPD officers guarding the headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators walk past LAPD officers guarding the headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • An LAPD officer stands guard along San Pedro Street as a man wearing a mask sits on the curb after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march along 2nd street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators block 5th street in front of the LAPD after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

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Spurred by the death of George Floyd, a Minnesota black man who died during a violent arrest, mammoth demonstrations rolled out for the fourth straight day in about a dozen communities around the Southland on Saturday, May 30. After dark — despite curfews installed by Los Angeles and other communities — clusters of looters smashed windows, robbed retail venues and set fires as law enforcement tried to keep pace.

 

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Protests, some violent, spread nationally in wake of George Floyd death

By SUDHIN THANAWALA The Associated Press

ATLANTA >> Demonstrators marched, stopped traffic and in some cases lashed out violently at police as protests erupted Friday in dozens of U.S. cities following the killing of George Floyd after a white officer pressed a knee into his neck while taking him into custody in Minnesota. In Phoenix, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and beyond, thousands of protesters carried signs that said: “He said I can’t breathe. Justice for George.” They chanted “”No justice, no peace” and “Say his name. George Floyd.”

After hours of peaceful protest in downtown Atlanta, some demonstrators suddenly turned violent, smashing police cars, setting one on fire, spray-painting the iconic logo sign at CNN headquarters, and breaking into a restaurant. The crowd pelted officers with bottles, chanting “Quit your jobs.”

At least three officers were hurt and there were multiple arrests, Atlanta police spokesman Carlos Campos said. Campos said protesters shot BB guns at officers and threw bricks, bottles and knives at them. People watched the scene from rooftops, some laughing as skirmishes broke out.

Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms passionately addressed the protesters at a news conference: “This is not a protest. This is not in the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr.”

“You are disgracing our city,” she told protesters. “You are disgracing the life of George Floyd and every other person who has been killed in this country. We are better than this. We are better than this as a city. We are better than this as a country. Go home, go home.”

Bottoms was flanked by rappers T.I. and Killer Mike, as well as King’s daughter, Bernice King.

Killer Mike cried as he spoke.

“We have to be better than this moment. We have to be better than burning down our own homes. Because if we lose Atlanta what have we got?” he said.

After Mayor Bottoms appealed for calm, the violence continued. More cars were set on fire, a Starbucks was smashed up, the windows of the College Football Hall of Fame were broken, and the iconic Omni Hotel was vandalized.

Protesters gathered outside the White House, with President Donald Trump inside, and some tried to push through barriers set up by the U.S. Secret Service along Pennsylvania Avenue.

In Minneapolis, a curfew did little to stop protesters and others from gathering in several areas of the city, including the battered Lake Street neighborhood where a police precinct was burned the night before. There were scattered small fires and some stores in a strip mall were being broken into near the city’s 5th Precinct.

An initially peaceful demonstration in New York City spiraled into chaos as night fell, as protesters skirmished with officers, destroyed police vehicles and set fires.

In Brooklyn, activists who had marched from Manhattan chanted insults at officers lined up outside the Barclays Center and pelted them with water bottles. Police sprayed an eye-irritating chemical into the largely diverse crowd multiple times, then cleared the plaza.

Video posted to social media showed officers using batons and shoving protesters down as they took people into custody and cleared streets.

Demonstrators rocked a police van, set it ablaze, then scrawled graffiti across its charred hulk and set it on fire a second time as officers retreated from the area. Blocks away, protesters used a club to batter another police vehicle.

Numerous people were arrested and police brought in buses to carry off those they arrested.

“We have a long night ahead of us in Brooklyn,” Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted. “Our sole focus is deescalating this situation and getting people home safe. There will be a full review of what happened tonight. We don’t ever want to see another night like this.”

The police department said numerous officers were injured, including one who had a tooth knocked out.

The names of black people killed by police, including Floyd and Eric Garner, who died on Staten Island in 2014, were on signs carried by those in the crowd, and in their chants.

“It’s my duty to be out here,” said Brianna Petrisko, among those at Foley Square in lower Manhattan, where most were wearing masks amid the coronavirus pandemic. “Our country has a sickness. We have to be out here. This is the only way we’re going to be heard.”

In Houston, where George Floyd grew up, several thousand people rallied in front of City Hall. Among them was 19-year-old Jimmy Ohaz, who came from the nearby city of Richmond, Texas.

“My question is how many more, how many more? I just want to live in a future where we all live in harmony and we’re not oppressed.”

Tensions rose in several West Coast cities as night fell.

About 1,000 protesters gathered in Oakland at a demonstration billed on social media as a rally to “F(asterisk)(asterisk)(asterisk) the police,” and some windows were smashed.

Demonstrators shut down a freeway in Los Angeles amid isolated scuffles with police that ended in a few protesters detained and one officer receiving medical treatment, police said. An LAPD vehicle had its windows smashed, and CNN reported that someone wrote “killer” on a patrol car.

Protesters repeatedly clashed with police in the Silicon Valley city of San Jose, said Mayor Sam Liccardo, and police responded with flash-bang grenades and rubber bullets. One officer was being treated at a hospital for an injury that was not life-threatening, he and police officials said.

Liccardo said his own officers shared the community’s outrage over Floyd’s in-custody death.

“It was a horrible injustice. I’d venture to guess that every police officer out there feels much of the same anger about what happened in Minneapolis,” he told The Associated Press.

Thirty miles to the west, Santa Cruz police chief Andrew G. Mills said in a statement that the actions by Minneapolis officers in Floyd’s death “are the antithesis of what we view as good policing.”

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