Tortie kitten Lyra is a lovely little ‘lionness’

Breed: Tortoiseshell

Age: 11 months

Gender: Spayed female

Lyra’s story: Lyra is feisty, playful and sweet. Her coat is super silky and soft, with beautiful markings. She’s shy at first, but will warm up gradually. She loves to be petted and is learning to rest on laps, but she won’t hear about being carried. She loves pouncing on shiny, rattling toys and carries her favorite mice and stuffed toys like a lion with prey. She adores sitting in the sun. She’d do well alone or with a couple of other mellow cats. She’s good with calm dogs. Lyra can be protective of her food so needs space while eating.

Adoption fee: $200, includes spay, vaccines, feline immunodeficiency and leukemia virus tests, worm and flea treatment, and microchip.

Adoption procedure: DREAM Animal Rescue’s adoption process includes an application, home visit, adoption fee and adoption contract. Complete the rescue’s adoption application on its website.

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Thunder is a sweet, loving cat who deserves his own bed

Breed: Domestic shorthair


Thunder is a sweet guy ready to love someone. (Courtesy of Long Beach Spay and Neuter Foundation)

Age: 10 years

Gender: Neutered male

Thunder’s story: Thunder is a quiet senior who is looking for a kind, loving person to care for him. He lived outside someone’s home for 10 years, but despite having little human contact, he is a sweet, loving guy. Thunder deserves a bed or his own and to live indoors for the second part of his life. He’s fully vaccinated and microchipped.

Adoption donation: $50

Adoption procedure: Contact Lorraine with Long Beach Spay & Neuter Foundation at 562-544-0335 or lbsn2006@yahoo.com to arrange a meeting.

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Coronavirus: Family emergency planning should take pets into account

  • Callie Acosta of Riverside gives love to her newly adopted Gizz-Moe, a 10-year-old, blind, shih tzu mix, at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Chairs are set up outside in case of a crowd at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center’s intake area in Riverside on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. “Visitors are following the six foot rule. Families are obviously staying together, but the others are doing good with following. Sometimes it takes a verbal reminder, but they have all be very receptive and have reacted positively,” says Molly Shannon, community relations mgr. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

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  • Penelope, 10, is greeted by a gloved and masked potential owner at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Callie Acosta of Riverside shows her enthusiasm after adopting Gizz-Moe, a 10-year-old, blind shih tzu mix, at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. Southern California agencies recommend pet owners have a plan for someone to take care of their animals should they get sick with coronavirus. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Angela Eaton of Menifee walks toward the grassy area to meet a prospective dog at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center in Riverside on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Gini, 2, gets exercise with Caitlyn Fuller, adoption counselor, at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center in Riverside on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Chairs are set up outside in case of a crowd at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center’s intake area in Riverside on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. “Visitors are following the six foot rule. Families are obviously staying together, but the others are doing good with following. Sometimes it takes a verbal reminder, but they have all be very receptive and have reacted positively,” says Molly Shannon, community relations mgr. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Animals are up for adoption, including some surrenders due to the coronavirus at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center in Riverside on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • “Help may be available in the form of friends, family or community resources. An example is our Pet Food Assistance Program, which provides dog or cat food to those experiencing a hardship. Most organizations, including ours, would prefer for pets to stay with their owners, but understand that’s not always possible. That’s where our owner surrenders, done by appointment, can help,” Molly Shannon, community relations mgr., says at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center in Riverside on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • “If you’ve been thinking of adopting, now is a great time. You’ll be home more to help the pet get acclimated to you and it’s new house. Also, pet owners should reach out if they need help during this time,” Molly Shannon, community relations mgr., says at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center in Riverside on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • If you need a three-legged friend, Abel is your man, up for adoption at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center in Riverside on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Aspen is an owner surrender due to the coronavirus at Mary S. Roberts Pet Adoption Center in Riverside on Wednesday, April 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

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Southern California residents should keep pets in mind during the coronavirus pandemic — and not just their own pets, officials say.

Animal care agencies in recent days have advised people to create an emergency plan for their pets, just as they should have family emergency plans. Such a plan for pets would be executed if an animal owner is hospitalized for coronavirus and could include plans for someone to care for the pet or pets.

In addition, with many shelters closed or having limited services during the pandemic, people may be asked to look out for and temporarily care for strays they may find in their neighborhoods.

The San Bernardino Police Department said that it and the San Bernardino County Coalition of Animal Shelters are asking residents to prepare emergency plans for their pets.

“With the rapid increase of (coronavirus) cases in Southern California, the demand for hospital stays and medical assistance from hospitals and medical providers is escalating,” police said in a statement. “Animal shelters are preparing for a surge in lost and temporarily homeless animals as a result.”

The Inland Valley Humane Society and Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) said pet owners should put together extra food, two weeks of medication, a kennel and any other necessary supplies for a pet in the event of illness.

In addition, pet owners should find a temporary caregiver for their pets. Caregivers could range from a family member or neighbor to a pet-sitter or boarding facility.

“Make sure all pets have proper identification with your name and contact information,” San Bernardino police said. “Document whether your pet(s) are up to date on vaccinations, write your veterinarian’s contact information and provide the information of some family or friends who will be able to update your pet’s caregiver on your medical status.”

LA Animal Services offered similar advice on an emergency plan for pet owners in a March 13 statement.

The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department said it isn’t uncommon for deputies to run into situations involving pets and their owners.

“Each incident is on a case-by-case basis,” officials said in a statement. “Depending on the situation, we either coordinate with a family member, neighbor or we contact animal control to take possession of the animal. Ultimately, it really depends on the circumstances.”

Several animal shelters throughout Southern California have shut down or have limited operations during the coronavirus pandemic. Those who need information or services should contact their local shelter or check its website.

“People need to figure out who is going to take care of their pets if they go to the hospital or god forbid, they die,” said Maryanne Dell, former pets columnist for the Orange County Register and president of the Shamrock Rescue Foundation in Santa Ana.

Dell said someone could ask a vet if they can board their pet if something were to happen to them, or arrange with a friend who could keep the animal at their house

“By having a plan, you can rest assured that your animal companions will be cared for no matter the circumstance,” the Inland Valley Humane Society & SPCA said. “Your preparedness plan also allows public animal shelters to maintain space and be better prepared for stray pets, animal welfare emergencies and the upcoming kitten season.”

LA Animal Services also said Wednesday that it will not turn away any sick or injured animals during the pandemic. It also suggested that people finding pets wandering in their neighborhoods post photos and descriptions of them on social media — and consider sheltering them for up to 30 days to free up space in shelters.

“Another way Angelenos can help is to consider our Shelter-at-Home Program and foster the dog or cat, while searching for the owner,” LA Animal Services said.

The Shelter-at-Home program is a process through which a person finds a pet, advises Animal Services that it is lost and then houses the animal while searching for its owner. Animal Services said after 30 days but before 32 days, the person who found the pet must either decide to keep it or surrender the animal to Animal Services.

A person housing a pet through the program will free up space in shelters throughout the city.

“We’re also taking in pets whose owner has died, leaving them alone, as well as taking in pets whose owner lives alone and is too sick to care for them,” Brenda Barnette, general manager for LA Animal Services, said in a statement Wednesday.

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Milo the Chihuahua is an easygoing little guy

Breed: Chihuahua

Age: 8 years

Sex: Neutered male

Size: 8 pounds

Milo’s story: Milo is a precious little, apple-headed boy. He is very sweet and loyal to his owner. Milo loves treats and following his people around. He likes most other dogs and ignores cats and is overall very easy – he doesn’t even lift his leg. He weighed as much as 12 1/2 pounds but has slimmed down to 8 and is in great shape. Milo has a heart murmur, but he saw a cardiologist and does not need medications at this time. He also has luxating patellas (kneecaps), very common in Chihuahuas. He walks just fine but should be discouraged from doing a lot of jumping. And he has bronchitis (a noncontagious cough) and is on medication for it that is not very expensive. He will need an owner willing to keep him on the thinner side and a home with no smokers. He is a pleasure to be around; he’s crate-trained, good on the leash, and quiet unless someone is at the door. Milo is a very easy dog.

Adoption fee: $250

Adoption procedure: Visit Pups and Pals’ website for full adoption procedures and the adoption application. We ask for an application before scheduling a visit with the dog. Check out Milo’s biography at pupsandpals.net/pet/ milo-the-meatball. If you have questions about Milo not answered on the website, call 562-713-5103. If Milo isn’t your perfect match, check out the other dogs on the site.

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German shepherd Boscoe is a big teddy bear looking for love

Breed: German shepherd

Age: 2 years

Gender: Neutered male

Size: 75 pounds

Boscoes story: Boscoe is the complete package, loving and smart. He is charming and gains the spotlight in whatever room he enters. “Mr. Lovable” enjoys belly rubs, playing with toys and giving kisses. He knows some basic commands such as sit and stay, but will also come if you tap your leg, shake his head on command and jump on his hind legs if you beat your chest. If you were to ask Boscoe what his favorite thing in the world is, his answer would quickly be “Humans!” If you’d like to complete your family with a large, furry, smart and lovable dog, then Boscoe is your guy.

Adoption fee: $250

Adoption procedure: Complete the required adoption application at icaredogrescue.org or contact I.C.A.R.E Dog Rescue at rescue@icaredogrescue.org.

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Adopt Bennie, the Staffordshire terrier who loves everyone

Breed: Staffordshire terrier

Age: 5 years

Gender: Male

Bennie’s story: This lovable, cuddly and handsome boy loves to please — he’ll listen to commands and sit and shake politely. He enjoys long walks, running around our play yards when feeling energetic and cuddling once he is tired. Bennie has a good blend of affection and loyalty, making him an ideal family dog for any family willing to giving him stability and consistency. Bennie embraces the company of adults and children and has enjoyed playing with large dogs who are submissive.

Adoption fee: An approved applicant will receive a reduced fee of $20 that includes free training, neutering, vaccines and flea control.

Adoption procedure: To meet with Bennie, stop by the Mission Viejo Animal Services Center at 28095 Hillcrest. For more information, call 949-470 3045 or go to the city’s website.

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Adopt sweet, gentle husky mix Sabrina

Breed: Siberian husky mix

Age: 4 years

Gender: Spayed female

Size: 65 pounds

Sabrina’s story: Sabrina is a sweet, gentle dog with nice manners. She enjoys long walks outdoors as much as cuddling and hanging out indoors. Sabrina is house-trained, knows basic commands and walks nicely on a leash (she’s had professional training, and a free session is included with her adoption). Sabrina does best with calm dogs, and kids will enjoy her affectionate nature and playful energy.

Adoption fee: $200, includes veterinary exam, spay, vaccinations, flea treatment, microchip and a training session

Adoption procedure: Contact New Beginnings For Animals at info@greatpets.org or 949-3 48-8057; visit greatpets.org to submit an online adoption application.

 

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Adopt Gregory, a lovebug of a Yorkshire terrier mix

Breed: Yorkshire terrier mix

Age: 5 years

Gender: Neutered male

Size: 9 pounds

Gregory’s story:Gregory was turned in at a local shelter because of landlord issues. He was released to rescue because he was severely underweight and needs to gain two or three pounds to meet his ideal weight of 11-12 pounds. He is learning how to walk well on a leash, becoming socialized and learning all about house-training. This doll baby is a pure lap dog. He gets along with every friend he meets, two- and four-legged. Meet Gregory and you will fall in love. Gregoryis up to date on vaccinations, microchipped and crate-trained at night.

Adoption procedure: Submit an adoption application to Ken-Mar Rescue at KenMarRescue.org.

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Why do people abandon their old pets?

On Friday, Jan. 26, the Riverside Press-Enterprise’s website ran a story about a man who abandoned a dog in a Hemet Stater Bros. parking lot.

“It is somewhat strange that someone would abandon an older dog, after presumably caring for it for its life. Regardless, it is very sad and it’s also a crime,”  Animal Services Officer Kyle Stephens said in a statement released by Animal Services.

“Somewhat” may be the operative word here. Sadly, the lower-than-low individual who removed a dog carrier from his car and placed it on the ground in the store’s parking lot, then drove away, is not an anomaly. He is but one of dozens (hundreds? thousands?) of people who do the same thing every day, every week, every month.

The insult to injury was that this poor Chihuahua who was left behind is 10 years old, an age that would qualify it for a senior discount if dogs could obtain such things.

The shelter has not yet put the dog up for adoption; the pup will be held pending an investigation into the man who abandoned it.

In another shelter, the North Central shelter in Los Angeles, Canela sits in a run, no doubt wondering where her owner is.  The 13-year-old dog was brought to the shelter Friday, Jan. 26 by a man who relinquished her because she is old, according to a volunteer who videotaped the dog being left at the facility.

Canela is 13 years old. On Friday, Jan. 26, her owner left her at the North Central animal shelter in Los Angeles, saying she was old and "don't do nothing no more." She can be adopted through the shelter: 888-452-7381. Reference number A0703344.
Canela is 13 years old. On Friday, Jan. 26, her owner left her at the North Central animal shelter in Los Angeles, saying she was old and “don’t do nothing no more.” She can be adopted through the shelter: 888-452-7381. Reference number A0703344.

Why abandon a dog because she’s old?

“She don’t do nothing no more – she don’t chase the cats,” the man who dumped Canela told the volunteer.

If only this statement were the most ludicrous thing anyone had ever heard. Sadly, for those of us in rescue, it isn’t. It’s just one of many, of the thousands (millions?) that people at shelters and in rescues hear every year. Watching a dog like Canela being forced to leave her owner is heart-breaking, to say the least.

The reason for dumping her, and whatever reason the person who dumps the Chihuahua gives, should he ever be found, are ludicrous. They’re inhumane and cruel and needless.

The internet is full of another “why” question: Why would someone do this? And a how: How could they? How could someone who has had an animal for more than a decade decide to just dump him or her at a shelter? Or worse, by the side of a road (or in a parking lot)?

I have no idea, other than that they are soulless. And heartless. I pray that karma, or God, or whatever spirit they believe in (if indeed they have any spirituality) comes full circle and sees them in a similar situation when are old and “don’t do nothing” anymore.

Otherwise intelligent, sane and very nice people put demands on their pets they would never put on other family members. Dogs’ jobs aren’t to chase cats, or to do anything. They are to be our companions. We domesticated them — most of them, anyway; certainly dogs — as work partners, true, but when it comes to the family pet that isn’t the case anymore.

I’ll be the first to say that a bonus of having dogs is that they bark if anyone who shouldn’t be there comes snooping around my house; they’re a great deterrent. But that’s all that is: a bonus. If my dogs were all mute I would still have them, love them, and treat them like the family members they are.

I could add a dozen more examples of old animals dumped at shelters, just in California, just from today. But I won’t, because there’s no end to this. There simply are too many people who still see animals as disposable things instead of sentient beings. Until that changes, this deplorable behavior will continue, and those of us whose hearts bleed and eyes leak whenever we hear about it will continue to ask “How could you?”

 

 

 

 

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Looking for a ball buddy? Adopt Peekaboo, a Brussels griffon mix

Breed: Brussels griffon mix

Age: 2 years

Gender: Neutered male

Size: 12 pounds

Peekaboo’s story: Peekaboo is a ball fiend. He loves to chase balls and bring them back so he can chase them again. He’s a friendly little guy, although he chooses his friends by some method only he knows. If he loves you, he loves you and will be your friend for life. He isn’t fond of a lot of action so would do best in a home with no young children. He’s also a loner who needs to be the only pet, or at least the only dog. (It remains to be seen what he thinks of cats, but Shamrock Rescue is happy to work with a potential adopter to see what he thinks of felines before an adoption is approved.) Peekaboo is a healthy and happy guy who deserves to have a home for life after being dumped at a shelter.

Adoption fee: $200, includes veterinary exam, microchip and all vaccinations

Adoption procedure: Contact Maryanne at Shamrock Rescue Foundation at 714-270-4187 or shamrockrf@gmail.com. Fill out an adoption application at shamrockrescue.org and email it to shamrockrescuerf@gmail.com

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