Trabuco Hills football rallies to beat Newport Harbor with huge boost from Perez

MISSION VIEJO — In the fourth quarter of Friday night’s game, Newport Harbor set up to kick a field goal to add to its lead, but Trabuco Hills’ Nick Perez had other plans.

The senior blocked the field goal attempt, scooped up the ball and returned it 88 yards for a touchdown that gave the Mustangs the lead for good in a 23-13 nonleague victory at Trabuco Hills High.

After being behind 13-0 in the first quarter, the Mustangs scored 23 consecutive points.

Postgame interview with Drew Barrett of Trabuco Hills. 139 yards rushing and a TD as the Mustangs come away with a huge victory!@ocvarsity @THHSAthletics @ThhsStampede @THHSMustangs @THHS_Football pic.twitter.com/TLqyFjwFWE

— Manny Alvarez (@MAlvarez02) September 18, 2021

“It was a team effort,” Trabuco Hills running back Drew Barrett said. “We started off slow, but we were way more conditioned than they were. We just fired off at 100 percent. Up or down, we gave it 100 percent every play and it paid off and we got that W.”

Trabuco Hills (3-1) gambled at the start of the game by going for it on fourth down at its own 17-yard line. The Mustangs were stopped, had to give the ball over to the Sailors, who cashed in the opportunity with a 6-yard touchdown run by Payton Irving.

Newport Harbor (1-3) took advantage of a fumble recovery with a 9-yard touchdown pass from Nick Kim to Kashton Henjum, but that’s all the Sailors could muster.

“Our defense made great adjustments,” Trabuco Hills coach Mark Nolan said. “They played hard and competed. They did a really nice job, especially down the stretch. We held them in a shutout after we gifted them 13 points.”

Trabuco Hills defense with a great night tonight!@ocvarsity @THHSAthletics @ThhsStampede @THHS_Football pic.twitter.com/vX4Xx7TAAp

— Manny Alvarez (@MAlvarez02) September 18, 2021

Trabuco Hills got on the scoreboard in the second quarter with a 54-yard pass from Will Burns to Ben Holland.

Following a Holland field goal, Newport Harbor was on its way to adding a field goal but Perez rushed in for the block that resulted in an 88-yard return for a score.

Postgame interview with Nick Perez of Trabuco Hills as his field goal block, which he would return for an 88 yard TD sealed the victory for the Mustangs!@ocvarsity @THHSAthletics @THHS_Football @THHSMustangs @ThhsStampede pic.twitter.com/nI5mTkx2Hy

— Manny Alvarez (@MAlvarez02) September 18, 2021

“I was containing my side,” Perez said. “I saw the block and the ball in the air. I picked it up and ran. I saw a clear path and I took it.”

Barrett rushed for 139 yards on 27 carries with a touchdown, and Will Burns finished 6 of 19 passing for 119 yards with a touchdown. He also had 39 yards rushing on five carries.

Will Kim completed 18 of 29 passing for 199 yards and a touchdown, while Kashton Henjum caught nine passes for 121 yards and a score.

Carson de Avila rushed for 62 yards on seven carries and Robby Crowell had a game-high eight tackles for the Sailors.

Trabuco Hills will host Segerstrom on Friday, Sept. 24. Newport Harbor will host JSerra on the same night.

Read more about Trabuco Hills football rallies to beat Newport Harbor with huge boost from Perez This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed. OC Shredding Business

Powered by WPeMatico

OCVarsity football wrap-up: All of Friday’s stories, scores and more from Week 4

This is the place to find all of OCVarsity’s coverage of Friday’s high school football games, plus the stories, scores and photos from Thursday’s games.

FRIDAY’S GAMES

SCORES

High school football: All of the scores from Friday’s Week 4 games

PHOTO GALLERY

High school football: Our top photos from Friday’s Week 4 games

GAME STORIES

Santa Margarita football knocks off Los Alamitos with second-half comeback

Servite football sparked by Fifita and McMillan in victory over Sierra Canyon

Edison football starts fast, beats San Clemente behind defense, special teams

Records broken as Orange football defeats Capistrano Valley in 67-47 shootout

Everything goes right for Foothill football in rout of La Mirada

El Modena football uses late TD and some trickery to beat Aliso Niguel

Mission Viejo football handles Alemany

Rancho Cucamonga’s turnovers prove costly against JSerra football

Trabuco Hills football rallies to beat Newport Harbor with huge boost from Perez

THURSDAY’S GAMES

OCVarsity football wrap-up: All of Thursday’s stories, scores and more

Focused Cypress football sprints past Katella to continue sizzling start

Huntington Beach football scores early, often in win over Marina

Pacifica football routs Buena Park with big plays from Cowens, Ross

Tustin football dominated by Ayala, sophomore QB Bryan Wilson

Defense stars for Laguna Hills football in victory over Northwood

Saddleback football continues hot start with win over Bolsa Grande

High school football: Scores from all of Thursday’s Week 4 games

Read more about OCVarsity football wrap-up: All of Friday’s stories, scores and more from Week 4 This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed. OC Shredding Business

Powered by WPeMatico

El Modena football uses late TD and some trickery to beat Aliso Niguel

ORANGE — The El Modena football team is no stranger to closely-contested games.

The Vanguards found themselves in another tight one Friday night, but they prevailed with Sam Astor’s 22-yard, go-ahead touchdown catch in the fourth quarter to defeat Aliso Niguel 20-15 at El Modena High.

Astor was held without a catch in the first half so El Modena coach Matt Mitchell made it a point to get Astor more involved in the second half.

“We talked at halftime, we gotta get the ball to Sam (Astor),” Mitchell said, “and we figured a thing or two out with Sam and got the ball to him and got him going.”

Three of El Modena’s four games have been been decided by one score. The Vanguards (3-1) had a 19-14 win over Santa Ana and a 17-15 loss to Sunny Hills before their five-point win over the Wolverines (3-2).

El Modena QB Jack Keays is hyped after the win over Aliso Niguel. Keays (1 pass TD, 1 rush TD) gave praise to his teammates until the end of the interview. @ocvarsity @elmodenafb @KeaysJackson @elmorowdyrooter pic.twitter.com/7D2Ke6LNoX

— David Delgado🇪🇨 (@DavidDelgado_OC) September 18, 2021

Vanguards quarterback Jack Keays threw a touchdown pass and ran for a score, and their special teams also played a crucial role in the outcome.

Alex Luna scored the first touchdown on a fake field goal.

Mitchell said the play is designed to have the holder, Luna, throw a pass downfield, but Luna didn’t find an open receiver or any room at all going to his left, so he quickly reversed field and went to his right. He made his way all the way across the field, picking up nice blocks along the way, for a 19-yard touchdown run.

“I didn’t think we would score on our special teams, a touchdown on a scramble play, and then they block a kick for a touchdown,” Mitchell said. “It’s high school football at its best you know, and you try to coach every aspect it.”

The blocked kick Mitchell referred to was a 25-yard field goal attempt that was swatted away by the Wolverines and then scooped up by Jaden Beisel for a 70-yard return that made the game 7-6 at halftime.

Instead of a 10-0 advantage for the Vanguards at the break, they found themselves clinging to a slim lead in the second half.

In the third, Keegan Shone’s field goal gave Aliso Niguel a 9-7 lead then Keays scored on a 10-yard run on El Modena’s next drive for a 14-9 advantage.

The Wolverines responded when Shaun McCaghren found Christian Aaberg for a 36-yard TD pass with 8:19 left in the fourth to go up 15-14. Aliso Niguel was stopped on the 2-point attempt.

The Vanguards’ next possession ended in a punt but the defense made a big play to get that ball back as Zac Brehm forced a fumble and recovered it as well, his second recovery of the game.

That set up Keays for the eventual game-winning pass. He hit Astor on a slant, the receiver found a seam in the Aliso Niguel defense and raced across the goal line.

Powered by WPeMatico

Saddleback football continues hot start with win over Bolsa Grande

SANTA ANA — Before Thursday night’s game, Bolsa Grande said it was going to force Saddleback to pass the ball by blitzing.

That may have been a mistake.

Wide receiver Isaias Ramirez caught three touchdown passes and ran for a score to lead Saddleback to a 41-14 nonleague victory over the Matadors at Segerstrom High.

It’s the first time since 2015 that Saddleback has started a season t 3-1.

“I think it’s more about the kids knowing that they have a staff that believes in them,” Saddleback coach Glenn Campbell said. “We love these kids like our own kids. I think when you get into any situation like that, that’s when the coaches have your back. Even though we hold them accountable, we actually make sure they know what they’re doing before doing it.”

Postgame interview with Saddleback coach Glenn Campbell as his Roadrunners are 3-1 for the first time since 2015!@ocvarsity @SaddlebackHS pic.twitter.com/riW3LvVRQh

— Manny Alvarez (@MAlvarez02) September 17, 2021

The Roadrunners scored the first touchdown within the first 40 seconds of the game thanks to a 43-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Albert Marquez to Ramirez.

Ramirez would end the night with six catches for 145 yards to go along with his three touchdown catches.

The three touchdown catches give Ramirez 10 receiving touchdowns this season.

“I know he is always going to be open,” Marquez said of Ramirez. “I just know that. He’s always my go-to guy.”

Postgame interview with Albert Marquez of Saddleback. 207 passing yards and 3 touchdown passes for Marquez as the Roadrunners are 3-1!@ocvarsity @SaddlebackHS pic.twitter.com/vWb6N8bPoP

— Manny Alvarez (@MAlvarez02) September 17, 2021

Marquez was 9 of 16 passing for 207 yards with the three touchdowns and had five carries for 40 yards.

Bolsa Grande (2-2) grabbed its only lead in the game with a 64-yard touchdown pass from Samer Alqam to Phu Nguyen that followed Saddleback’s opening score.

Alqam ran for the 2-point conversion to give the Matadors an 8-7 lead, but it was all Saddleback after that.

Bolsa Grande entered the game averaging 30 points per game.

“Oh wow, I didn’t know that,” Ramirez said. “I’m shocked. Our defense really balled out. It takes 11 (players on defense) and everyone did their part and did their job after bouncing back from last week. We wanted it more.”

Postgame interview with Isaias Ramirez of Saddleback. 6 catches for 145 yards and 3 TD catches as the Roadrunners are 3-1!@ocvarsity @SaddlebackHS pic.twitter.com/7JXgcVHZnv

— Manny Alvarez (@MAlvarez02) September 17, 2021

Alqam went 14 of 24 passing for 137 yards and two touchdowns, while Ethan Nguyen rushed for 65 yards on 13 carries. Phu Nguyen caught three passes for 81 yards and a touchdown.

Carlos Carro rushed for 49 yards on six carries with a touchdown for Saddleback, and Rodrigo Nieves rushed for 38 yards with a score on eight carries to go with a team leading eight tackles. Donovan Castellanos caught two passes for 61 yards for the Roadrunners.

Saddleback is back at Segerstrom High to take on Riverside La Sierra on Friday, Sept. 24. Bolsa Grande will host Godinez on Thursday, Sept. 23.

Powered by WPeMatico

Cristian Arango scores twice, LAFC beats Real Salt Lake

Entering the last third of the season, the Los Angeles Football Club needs points any way they can find them.

Sunday night at Banc of California Stadium during the last Major League Soccer clash of the weekend LAFC did exactly that, holding onto a 3-2 lead they were gifted to nail down a crucial Western Conference showdown against Real Salt Lake.

Two goals from Cristian Arango plus an own-goal lifted LAFC (8-9-6, 30 points) into dead heat with RSL for the last MLS Cup postseason spot.

RSL (8-8-6, 30 points) continues to sit in the seventh position due to a two goal advantage over LAFC via the goal differential tiebreaker.

“Tonight we have a great reward worthy of our great effort,” Arango said. “We suffer together and celebrate together.”

The fastest goal in LAFC history — the eighth quickest in MLS competition — delivered the Black & Gold an advantage 20 seconds after the opening whistle.

The sequence started near midfield when LAFC’s Colombian captain Eduard Atuesta picked up the ball and dribbled into RSL territory.

Atuesta picked out midfielder Bryce Duke running to his right, which opened a window to feed Danny Musovski in the box. Duke’s delivery, his second assist in as many matches, was redirected and fell to Arango, whose clean touch allowed him to beat RSL goalkeeper David Ochao.

The two sides tussled over the opening half hour until RSL’s Damir Kreilach again made an impact on the series.

The midfielder’s curling one-timer from outside the box leveled the score at one apiece and set in motion a frantic give and take — and give — 90 minutes.

“Wild game,” Bradley said. “Sometimes as you get into the latter part of the season and you’re playing these six point games they can become fast and furious. There’s mistakes on both sides.”

After Kreilach’s equalizer, LAFC wasted no time regaining the lead.

Arango, 26, secured his brace two minutes later when Atuesta lofted a chipped pass at his countryman’s head.

The redirected pass produced Arango’s fourth goal in LAFC’s last three contests.

“He wanted to be here and from the beginning you could tell he’s got a strong character and a great mentality,” Bradley said regarding the Colombian forward. “That part rubs off in a good way on everybody.

“He’s a guy you can count on. He plays for the team. He puts himself in really good positions in the box. He showed he can play an important role for us.”

RSL leveled the contest in the 48th minute when a rare miscue by Duke created a breakaway that gave forward Anderson Julio an opportunity to pick out the near post and beat Tomas Romero.

Then, as the hour mark approached, RSL gave away the game winner and a season sweep for LAFC.

After breaking up an attack in front of The 3252 supporters in the north end of the stadium, RSL defender Toni Datkovic did not hear Ochao try to wave him off as the ball trundled into the box.

Instead Datkovic gently nudged the ball back toward his goal, and Ochao could not reroute himself to make a save.

“There’s going to be some sort of crazy wild feeling aspect to games, especially for teams that are trying to get into the playoffs,” defender Sebastien Ibeagha said following his second consecutive start on the LAFC backline. “For us, we have quality, it’s about being composed and calm and letting our football shine.

“It’s a stepping stone. We’re trying to push this streak and go into the playoffs.”

After failing to score more than two times in any of its first 20 matches, LAFC has tallied three or more goals in its last three.

The club’s 10 goals during that stretch topped its total over seven contests between July 21 to Aug. 21, before a 3-3 tie to Galaxy preceded an end to the club’s historically bad eight-match winless streak that had dropped them as low as 11th in the conference standings.

Following with a pair of wins, LAFC, now in eighth position, heads on the road for matches in Austin, Portland and San Jose.

Away from home, LAFC is 2-7-1.

Only four of LAFC’s 11 remaining games take place at Banc of California Stadium, where it has accumulated 23 of its 30 points.

“We’re on an upward bound path where all we can do is continue to gain,” Arango said. “With all these goals we hope to accumulate more.”

Powered by WPeMatico

Whicker: At USC, the benefit of the doubt is now exhausted, as are its fans

  • Running back Vavae Malepeai #6 of the USC Trojans runs for a first down against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Head coach Clay Helton of the USC Trojans walks off the field after the Stanford Cardinal defeated the USC Trojans 42-28 during a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Head coach Clay Helton of the USC Trojans reacts after a turnover against Stanford Cardinal in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Defensive end Ryan Johnson #23 of the Stanford Cardinal pressures quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans looks on from the bench in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans after the Stanford Cardinal defeated the USC Trojans 42-28 during a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Head coach Clay Helton of the USC Trojans walks off the field after the Stanford Cardinal defeated the USC Trojans 42-28 during a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans runs off the field as the Stanford Cardinal defeated the USC Trojans 42-28 during a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Gary Bryant Jr. #1 of the USC Trojans drops a pass in the end zone against the Stanford Cardinal in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans looks on against the Stanford Cardinal in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Gary Bryant Jr. #1 of the USC Trojans drops a pass in the end zone against the Stanford Cardinal in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Head coach Clay Helton of the USC Trojans looks down after the Stanford Cardinal scores in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Gary Bryant Jr. #1 of the USC Trojans drops a pass in the end zone against the Stanford Cardinal in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Tahj Washington #16 of the USC Trojans drops a pass in front of cornerback Zahran Manley #31 of the Stanford Cardinal in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Head coach Clay Helton of the USC Trojans looks toward the video board against the Stanford Cardinal in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans looks on from the bench in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Isaiah Sanders #0 of the Stanford Cardinal runs for touchdown against the USC Trojans in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Cornerback Chris Steele #8 of the USC Trojans reacts after being called for a interference call against the Stanford Cardinal in the second half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Stanford Cardinal won 42-28. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • USC Trojans honors those that lost their lives in the 9/11 attacks prior to a NCAA football game between the USC Trojans and the Stanford Cardinal at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • USC Trojans honors those that lost their lives in the 9/11 attacks prior to a NCAA football game between the USC Trojans and the Stanford Cardinal at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • USC Trojans enters the field prior to a NCAA football game between the USC Trojans and the Stanford Cardinal at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A fan holding a US flag as the USC Trojans honors those that lost their lives in the 9/11 attacks prior to a NCAA football game between the USC Trojans and the Stanford Cardinal at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Head coach Clay Helton of the USC Trojans looks on prior to a NCAA football game between the USC Trojans and the Stanford Cardinal at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A fan holds a sign “LA Loves NY” as the USC Trojans honors those that lost their lives in the 9/11 attacks prior to a NCAA football game between the USC Trojans and the Stanford Cardinal at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans runs off the field as the Stanford Cardinal defeated the USC Trojans 42-28 during a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • head coach David Shaw of the Stanford Cardinal walks off the field after the Stanford Cardinal defeated the USC Trojans 42-28 during a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans runs off the field as the Stanford Cardinal defeated the USC Trojans 42-28 during a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Nathaniel Peat #8 of the Stanford Cardinal runs for first down past linebacker Clyde Moore #36 of the USC Trojans in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Elijah Higgins #6 of the Stanford Cardinal dives for yardage against the USC Trojans in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Head coach David Shaw of the Stanford Cardinal reacts against the USC Trojans in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Head coach Clay Helton of the USC Trojans reacts against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans scrambles against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Drake London #15 of the USC Trojans catches a pass for first down against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Defensive lineman Colin Mobley #90 of the USC Trojans hands off to running back Keaontay Ingram #28 of the USC Trojans against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Keaontay Ingram #28 of the USC Trojans runs for touchdown against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Nathaniel Peat #8 of the Stanford Cardinal reacts after a 87 yard touchdown run against the s in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Qide receiver Drake London #15 of the USC Trojans can’t reach a pass against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Cornerback Isaac Taylor-Stuart #6 of the USC Trojans is called for pass interference against wide receiver John Humphreys #5 of the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Qide receiver Drake London #15 of the USC Trojans can’t reach a pass against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Nathaniel Peat #8 of the Stanford Cardinal runs for a 80 plus yard touchdown against safety Calen Bullock #27 of the USC Trojans in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans sliders for the first down against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Elijah Higgins #6 of the Stanford Cardinal catches a pass for a touchdown past cornerback Joshua Jackson Jr. #23 of the USC Trojans in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Keaontay Ingram #28 of the USC Trojans is upededend against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Keaontay Ingram #28 of the USC Trojans runs for touchdown against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Elijah Higgins #6 of the Stanford Cardinal catches a pass for a touchdown past cornerback Joshua Jackson Jr. #23 of the USC Trojans in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Cornerback Isaac Taylor-Stuart #6 of the USC Trojans is called for pass interference against wide receiver John Humphreys #5 of the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Wide receiver Drake London #15 of the USC Trojans drops a pass against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Running back Keaontay Ingram #28 of the USC Trojans runs for first down against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Quarterback Kedon Slovis #9 of the USC Trojans with the quarterback keeper for the first down against the Stanford Cardinal in the first half of a NCAA football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Offensive lineman Courtland Ford #74 of the USC Trojans silhouetted walks toward the bench as they warm up prior to a NCAA football game against the Stanford Cardinal at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • USC Trojans warms up prior to a NCAA football game against the Stanford Cardinal at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 11, 2021. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

of

Expand

A lot of things died on the Coliseum turf Saturday night, including all extenuating circumstances.

USC football has sunk below the water table. The excuses fly out the window like a misguided pass by Kedon Slovis.

There are no unbearable injuries. There are all these gleaming new recruits and transfers. Patience, usually a virtue, descends into blindness if it tries to justify this 42-28 loss to Stanford, which was 42-13 early in the fourth quarter, conducted on the corner of Fiasco and Debacle.

All coaches’ days are numbered, to some extent, but Clay Helton’s tenure at USC seems closer than it’s ever been to the notary public’s signature book.

Some things can’t be helped, like Parker Lewis getting ejected on the opening kickoff for targeting. Lewis is, or was, the kicker himself. The only rational explanation is that Lewis was angling for an NIL endorsement deal with Target. A coach shouldn’t have to warn his players against that.

In any event, this wouldn’t be decided by field goals. But the hail of blunders that the Trojans have often survived in the past are no accident. You don’t have to be a firewater-belching Trojan alum who wonders why it isn’t still 1978 to demand a do-over, complete with the dreaded “culture change.”

Stanford, which had seven points and 233 yards against Kansas State last week, got one touchdown after two USC pass interference penalties. It was happy with a field goal at the end of another drive until Joshua Jackson lined up in the neutral zone, the third critical USC infraction of that drive, at which point Stanford coach David Shaw took the three points off the board and called for a touchdown, which Tanner McKee provided with a pass to Elijah Higgins.

Slovis wound up fielding almost as many as boos as Helton did. On third and five, he ignored one-on-one matchups on the right side and threw left, where the Cardinal had help. The pass was wayward, and Ryu Blu Kelly picked it and scored. Kelly’s dad Brian was a cornerback who did those types of things for USC, once upon a time.

Time and again Stanford’s receivers won simple battles against USC’s defensive backs, a process that was accelerated by the Trojans’ inability to bother McKee, a Corona Centennial alum who spent two years on a church mission to Brazil. Here, he burned USC with 16 for 23 passing and two touchdowns. It helped that he was not sacked or hit by USC’s socially-distant pass rushers.

“They showed a lot of faith in their young quarterback and he was exceptional,” said Helton, who said little about Slovis but otherwise was trying to lip-gloss what 56,945 had just witnessed.

Stanford enjoyed four plays that went 37 yards or more, including the simplest of sweeps by Nathaniel Peat that spanned 87 yards for a touchdown. USC’s so-what flurry at the end of the fourth quarter helped to balance the yardage, but it took Slovis 42 throws to amass 223 yards.

“This is Game 2,” Helton said pointedly. “I’m looking forward to winning some games and hearing how much we’ve improved since this game.”

The problem is that the top tier of the Pac-12 looks unusually strong. Oregon and UCLA have already toppled Ohio State and LSU, and Colorado nearly upset Texas A&M. The Trojans avoid Oregon but play the other two, along with Notre Dame,  Arizona State and BYU. But the presumed underdogs in the other games will see plenty of hope in this particular game tape.

A win would have at least provided some locker room mirth. Alex Stadthaus was the kicker who had to replace Lewis, and he converted both field goal tries.

“Parker is the type of guy who you can see going after people,” Stadthaus said. “He wants to make plays. When it happened, I said, no, it couldn’t be Parker. Then I saw that it was. So it was time to get going, make a few kicks. I told him that I’ll be you for tonight and you can be me.”

A team’s identity isn’t nearly that easy to exchange. In USC’s case it’s also hard to identify. Helton’s muscular 2017 team, the one that won the Pac-12 championship, twice bullied Stanford into submission. Then, once Sam Darnold left, the Trojans got suckered into playing pitch-and-catch, and that’s where they still are.

It does no good to have overflowing talent at tight end when you rarely use one. Jude Wolfe and Michael Trigg made one catch each for a total of 16 yards. But you also can’t change systems in a week or three or six. That’s why Saturday night felt like the end of something.

“It’s early in the season,” Clay Helton kept saying, and no one argued. It’s also late in the program.

Read more about Whicker: At USC, the benefit of the doubt is now exhausted, as are its fans This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed. OC Shredding Business

Powered by WPeMatico

Vaccine passports are an affront to liberty

One of the easiest ways to make a deadly error is to take action to address a problem without giving careful thought to whether the action you’re taking will solve the problem, or if will have dire unintended consequences without solving anything.

The latest example of the “we have to do something regardless of what it does to us” impulse is the impending mandate for vaccination passports, also known as vaccine verification. The idea is that people will be required to show proof that they are vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to enter an indoor space, such as a restaurant, retail store, office or venue, and even some outdoor spaces such as sports stadiums.

Legislation was floated in Sacramento to mandate vaccine verification. Proposals are pending in Los Angeles. San Francisco and New York City have already required it, and the president of the United States is reportedly considering a national program to restrict interstate travel.

Vaccination passports are a terrible idea and we’d better recognize the risks before we go any further down the path of “verification” by government as a condition of freedom.

This began with people receiving paper cards showing the date and the type of their COVID vaccination. Paper cards can be inconvenient to carry and are easily counterfeited. They are rapidly being replaced with an app that connects to a government database, so people can show their vaccination record on their phones. Next we’ll likely see tamper-proof ID cards with a magnetic stripe, so workers checking vaccination verification can use their own phone and an app to read the stripe and connect with the government database to verify vaccination status. Permission to enter will be determined by an instant red light or green light.

The next question will be, how many vaccinations does it take to change a light bulb?

Currently, the number is two, but it may soon be three. Maybe it will be once or twice per year. Incidentally, the White House announcement of the need for a third booster has already led to two high-level resignations at the FDA, reportedly because the White House jumped ahead of the FDA approval process. It suggests that the “we have to do something” impulse is separating from the careful determination of the value of what we are doing.

If the public accepts the idea of restricted entry to public places controlled by a government database, it’s a short step for the government to add or change the particular criteria used to determine who is allowed to go where.

You want to feel safe, right? There are many dangers. There’s seasonal flu, for example. What’s to stop the government from using that card you’re carrying or that app on your phone to “remind” you that you should get a flu shot, then to require a flu shot as a condition of entry to a public place?

What’s to stop the government from expanding the use of this automated system of controlling the movement of people? There’s a need for public safety. How long before the government’s verification database scoops up geolocation data from your phone for the purpose of contact tracing? If the database shows you’ve been in “close contact” with someone not “fully” vaccinated, will the app give you the red light when you try to enter a restaurant? A grocery store? A school?

Feel safe yet?

What about other types of threats? Will law enforcement records be merged with geolocation data in health records? How about gun and ammunition purchases? There’s no end to the helpful warnings the app can offer.

Vaccine verification systems are just one form of government control. Agencies can use their licensing power to coerce behavior. Legislation or regulations can offer a liability shield that is withdrawn unless there is compliance with edicts.

These control measures can quickly become their own universe, disconnected from their original purpose. The effort to create and implement enforcement mechanisms absorbs the attention of officials who can no longer be bothered to assess the efficacy or necessity of what they are doing.

If it goes far enough, you have a society like China, which last year introduced a QR code system that categorizes people into different colors for various reasons.

Think it can’t happen in the United States? Who’s going to stop it?

Do you have a mirror handy?

The fight to defend freedom begins with an understanding that freedom is a condition that exists under a government of limited power. It’s up to us, all of us, to enforce the boundaries of that power.

Even in a crisis, do not accept “we have to do something” as justification for initiating policies that are burdensome but useless. Demand to see evidence that the policies actually work. Demand an end to emergency powers when conditions no longer meet the legal definition of an emergency. Demand accountability for reckless and grievous policy errors that cause irreversible damage.

It’s insanity on steroids to say something like “Screw your freedom” and allow the government to mandate and enforce the use of an app, card and database to monitor and control the actions and movements of every person living within its jurisdiction. It’s even more insane to think that a system like that will keep us safe.

Write Susan Shelley: Susan@SusanShelley.com and follow her on Twitter: @Susan_Shelley.

Powered by WPeMatico

California housing plans need an overhaul

For more than a half-century, California has been trying to nudge county and city governments into generating enough new housing to handle an ever-increasing demand.

The state’s chief tool has been a legal requirement that local government “general plans” include an adequate “housing element.” Every eight years, the state Department of Housing and Community Development issues regional quotas of housing needs which then are divvied up into specific city-by-city goals for zoning enough land to meet projected needs.

The allocations are very controversial, especially in suburban communities, because they run counter to the not-in-my-backyard sentiments of local residents. As housing production falls chronically short of the state’s goals, the cyclic quotas steadily increase and in recent years the state has added penalties for failure.

Obviously, the quota system hasn’t been working very well and researchers at UCLA’s Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies have concluded that it has a “fundamental flaw” because vacant land being zoned for housing to meet the quotas is only rarely used for housing. Rather, the housing being built — which is still too little — tends to go on other property, including some previously being used for other purposes.

The study focused on what has happened in the San Francisco Bay Area vis-à-vis the housing quotas issued in the last decade for the eight-year period that will end next year.

“The median Bay Area city is on track to approve housing projects on less than 10% of the sites listed in its housing plan,” the study found. “On average, however, cities are achieving a substantial portion of their (too low) housing targets — nearly 60% for the median city — just not on the sites they had selected and presented to the state as likely or apt for development. Across the Bay Area as whole, nearly 70% of housing built during this period was on sites not listed in housing plans.”

While cities zone specific sites to meet quotas, “housing development occurs in a way that is hard to anticipate. In spite of planners’ efforts to select imminently viable sites, they do not.”

The solution, they say, is to create a more realistic set of requirements that identifies all potential sites for housing, a “change (that) may require cities to include many more sites in their housing plan.”

While a more realistic inventory might require more work — and possibly increase local angst — the UCLA team also proposes that “cities receive preemptive credit for housing they expect to be built on sites not listed in their plan.

“The credit would be tied to production on non-inventory sites during the previous period, giving cities an incentive to accommodate much-needed development when it is proposed, even if they can’t anticipate exactly where or what developers will want to build.”

“The Legislature should stop proliferating ever more detailed requirements for a site to be included in the inventory, and instead require cities to consider every parcel on which residential use is allowed,” the UCLA team suggests. “Since cities aren’t very good at picking the sites where developers want to build, the focus should shift to estimating how much housing is likely to be built during the planning period on the entire stock of residentially zoned land in a city.

This is wonky stuff, but important because of the state’s worsening housing shortage. The proposals would shift the housing quotas from an exercise in paper-shuffling into something more likely to produce real results. But implementing it would require an official admission that the current system isn’t working and a willingness to correct its “fundamental flaw.”

CalMatters is a public interest journalism venture committed to explaining how California’s state Capitol works and why it matters. For more stories by Dan Walters, go to calmatters.org/commentary

Powered by WPeMatico

Saddleback football rallies, defeats La Quinta with late field goal


Support our high school sports coverage by becoming a digital subscriber. Subscribe now


GARDEN GROVE – If Saddleback is trying to give football coach Glenn Campbell a panic attack, it’s off to a good start.

The Roadrunners took Thursday’s night nonleague game to the final seconds before Gio Quiroz kicked a game-winning, 21-yard field goal to defeat La Quinta 30-27 at Garden Grove High.

The victory followed a one-point victory by Saddleback last week, putting them at 2-0 to start the season.

“We had to do what we do,” Campbell said. “We didn’t want to change too much of our offense. We had a short week to prepare. Their offense was really crazy, based on the wing-T and what they do off the misdirections. We had to break down on the defense this week because of their misdirections. I’m happy with our win.”

Postgame interview with Saddleback coach Glenn Campbell as the Roadrunners come away with another close victory! 2-0!@ocvarsity @SaddlebackHS pic.twitter.com/kbzXoNrOEB

— Manny Alvarez (@MAlvarez02) September 3, 2021

La Quinta (0-2) leaned on its ground game against the Roadrunners. AJ Vasquez led all rushers with 101 yards on 19 carries and a touchdown while Erick Gonzalez ran for 77 yards on seven carries and also added a 37-yard score.

Down 17-14 in the final quarter, Saddleback took its first lead of the game with a 2-yard run by Carlos Carro, but the Aztecs struck back with a 39-yard touchdown run from Martin Dinh.

Saddleback took back the lead with a 35-yard touchdown pass from Albert Marquez to Isaias Ramirez.

La Quinta tied the game at 27 with Dinh’s second field goal of the contest, this time from 19 yards.

57.9 seconds left in the game

Saddleback 27
La Quinta 27

Martin Dinh with a 19 yard field goal for La Quinta as we are tied!@ocvarsity @TheRealLQHS @SaddlebackHS pic.twitter.com/Cos5Sf6NXM

— Manny Alvarez (@MAlvarez02) September 3, 2021

There was still time on the clock for the Roadrunners.

They drove down the field, with help from a 15-yard penalty and a 27-yard pass from Marquez to Ramirez. That set up the game-winning field goal by Quiroz.

“I was kind of off in the last game,” Quiroz said. “I put in extra work this week at practice. Shoutout to my coaches to stay after practice with me. It worked. All that extra hard work I put in worked.”

Postgame interview with Gio Quiroz of Saddleback as his 21 yard field goal puts the Roadrunners at 2-0!@ocvarsity @SaddlebackHS pic.twitter.com/uWmlsQiCdU

— Manny Alvarez (@MAlvarez02) September 3, 2021

La Quinta had one more chance with seconds left, but fumbled the ball. The Aztecs recovered and ran out the rest of the time.

Michael Arbes led La Quinta with two sacks while Dinh had a team-high seven tackles.

Marquez rushed for 45 yards on six carries and two touchdowns and was 10 of 16 passing for 126 yards.  Ramirez caught eight passes for 112 yards and a score.

Cale Breslin rushed for 84 yards on 10 carries for Saddleback.

La Quinta travels to Costa Mesa on Friday, Sept. 10, while Saddleback will take on Los Amigos on the same night.

 

Powered by WPeMatico

Brea plastic surgeon charged with sexually assaulting 2 patients; attorney calls allegations false and outrageous

FULLERTON — A plastic surgeon with offices in Brea and Beverly Hills pleaded not guilty Tuesday to sexually assaulting two of his patients.

Frederic Corbin, 77, of Villa Park, pleaded not guilty at his arraignment in the North Justice Center in Fullerton to one felony count each of sexual battery involving an unconscious person and sexual exploitation by a physician, and two misdemeanor counts each of sexual battery and battery, according to court records.

Corbin’s attorney, Courtney Pilchman, issued a statement saying her client “vehemently and categorically denies these outrageous and false allegations.”

“He has practiced for over 50 years, without any complaint by a female patient regarding inappropriate behavior,” the defense attorney said. “There are thousands of patients, colleagues and friends who support Dr. Corbin and know these allegations are untrue. This case is about two disgruntled patients who made allegations that we will prove are false.”

Corbin is accused of molesting one of his patients while he prepared her for a surgical procedure on Sept. 17 of last year, according to the Orange County District Attorney’s Office. The doctor is accused of molesting another patient on May 14, during an examination when she came in to his Brea office for a post-surgery treatment.

“Patients entrust their very lives to the doctors who treat them,” said Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer. “No one seeking medical treatment should have to worry about being sexually assaulted while under a doctor’s care. These women were in very vulnerable situations and their doctor capitalized on those vulnerabilities for his own sexual gratification.”

Corbin, who is free on $50,000 bail, was ordered to return to court Sept. 14 for a pretrial hearing.

Powered by WPeMatico