Coronavirus: Reopening of Orange County schools now delayed to Sept. 22, at the earliest

Orange County’s schools may be able to open in-person on Sept. 22 – not Sept. 8 – the Orange County Health Care Agency announced late Monday night via Twitter.

Under a new four-color, tiered monitoring system, Orange County is in the most restrictive of the tiers, but it’s on track to bump up to the next tier on Sept. 8.

The county would then remain for 14 days in that tier, county health officials confirmed with the the California Department of Public Health, according to the late-night Tweet.

That means that the earliest schools could welcome students to campuses is on Sept. 22.

When Gov. Gavin Newsom announced the new color-coded tier system on Friday, there was initially much confusion among Orange County educators as to what it meant for school reopenings. Then, the county’s health officer, Clayton Chau, tweeted that the switch to a new monitoring system did not reset the 14-day countdown and schools could still open as soon as Sept. 8, if lower case trends continue.

I confirmed with the State that has not changed for OC except for the update in the new blueprint usually occurs on Monday and the State posts on Tuesday, so the school reopening would be Tuesday, September 8, right after Labor Day weekend.

— OC Health Care Agency (@ochealth) August 28, 2020

On Saturday, county health officials cast doubt on that opening date. In a Tweet, officials said they requested clarification from schools on the 14-day wait cycle. “State indicated we would get credit for those days. More to come.”

Update re: Gov.’s new system. We’ve requested additional clarification from State re: schools as there are several counties, including #OC, who are in limbo as we were part way thru prior 14 day cycle to re-open. State indicated we would get credit for those days. More to come.

— OC Health Care Agency (@ochealth) August 29, 2020

The answer apparently came late Monday night.  The earliest Orange County schools can open to in-person learning will be Sept. 22.

County Health Officer received confirmation from @CAPublicHealth that #OC is on track to enter into Red Tier on Sept. 8. Providing we meet Red Tier metrics at that time, there will be a 14-day wait for all K-12 schools to be eligible for reopening, which could happen on Sept. 22.

— OC Health Care Agency (@ochealth) September 1, 2020

Al Mijares, county superintendent of schools, said in a statement Monday night: “I know how frustrating it is to be in this position, given the complex planning it takes to restart our campuses.”

“Dr. Chau has advocated strongly on our behalf, but the state was firm in its response.”

To learn more about the new color-coded monitoring system: Orange County lands in most restrictive tier of new coronavirus tracking system 

Read more about Coronavirus: Reopening of Orange County schools now delayed to Sept. 22, at the earliest This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

These O.C. parents have a message for Gov. Newsom, teachers’ unions: ‘Open up the schools.’

A pro-charter school group brought some 75 parents, teachers and a couple of Orange County Board of Education members together Tuesday evening to rally for the reopening of schools that were closed because of coronavirus concerns.

Parents, they said, should be making the choice of whether their children learn on campus or online.

“Open up the schools,” the crowd briefly chanted.

  • Jeff Barke, right, leads a rally outside the Santa Ana Educators Association office in Santa Ana on Tuesday, August 4, 2020. The rally calling for the reopening of schools was organized by the California Policy Center’s “Parent Union.” (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cecilia Iglesias, left, and Orange County Board of Education member Mari Barke, right, join others outside the Santa Ana Educators Association office during a ‘reopen the schools’ rally in Santa Ana on Tuesday, August 4, 2020. The rally was organized by the California Policy Center’s Parent Union, a pro-charter school group. Iglesias, a former Santa Ana councilwoman and school board member, works for the center and organized the meeting with Barke’s help. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Sound
    The gallery will resume inseconds
  • Rhonda Furin, center, joins others during a reopen the schools rally outside the Santa Ana Educators Association in Santa Ana on Tuesday, August 4, 2020. The rally was organized by a group called “Parent Union.” It’s a pro-charter school group under the libertarian California Policy Center. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A man holds up a sign during a ‘reopen the schools’ rally outside the Santa Ana Educators Association office in Santa Ana on Tuesday, August 4, 2020. The rally was organized by a“Parent Union.” (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • About 75 protesters gathered outside the Santa Ana Educators Association office for a ‘reopen the schools’ rally in Santa Ana on Tuesday, August 4, 2020. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cecilia Iglesias protests outside the Santa Ana Educators Association office during a reopen the schools rally in Santa Ana on Tuesday, August 4, 2020. Iglesias, a former Santa Ana councilwoman and former School Board member, organized the rally as the head of the “Parent Union,” a pro-charter school group under the libertarian California Policy Center. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Jeff Barke, a physician who advocates for the reopening of schools without social distancing or face masks, leads a ‘reopen the schools’ rally outside the Santa Ana Educators Association office in Santa Ana on Tuesday, August 4, 2020. The rally was organized by the California Police Center’s Parent Union group, a pro-charter group that said parents should have the choice of whether their children can return to campus for in-person learning or continue with online education. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Protestors gather outside the Santa Ana Educators Association for a reopen the schools rally in Santa Ana on Tuesday, August 4, 2020. The rally was organized by the California Policy Center’s “Parent Union.” (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Jeff Barke, right, leads a rally outside the Santa Ana Educators Association office in Santa Ana on Tuesday, August 4, 2020. The rally calling for the reopening of schools was organized by the California Policy Center’s “Parent Union.” (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)

of

Expand

Flanked by American flags and punctuated with religious references and prayer, the rally was organized by the Orange County-based California Policy Center’s “Parent Union,” which pointedly chose to host its event in front of the offices of the Santa Ana teachers’ union.

“That’s why we’re here,” said Jeff Barke, an Orange County physician who regularly advocates for reopening schools without face masks or social distancing but mentioned neither safety precaution during the rally. Instead, he and others focused attention on teacher unions, which have advocated for resuming school online for now.

“We’re here to let them know we’re sick and tired of the schools being closed. It’s not based on science. It’s not based on statistics. It’s not based on facts. It’s based on union power. “

Barbara Pearson, president of the Santa Ana teachers’ union – the Santa Ana Educators’ Association – called the protest “another desperate grab for attention in their struggle to stay relevant.

“It has nothing to do with the reopening of schools or the students of Santa Ana.  Governor Newsom made the decision to close schools, not the unions.  Our priority is the safety of staff and students,” Pearson wrote in an e-mail Tuesday night.

On July 17, Newsom ordered that all public and private schools in counties seeing a spike in coronavirus cases could not reopen for in-person learning in the new academic year. That affected all of Orange County’s schools, except for those elementary schools that are applying for a waiver. (State officials unveiled the waiver application process Monday night; it’s likely to impact mostly private and parochial schools.)

During the rally Tuesday, a few teachers spoke about the detrimental effects of online learning on all students, but especially those who need special services. Students have regressed academically since schools shut down mid-March due to the coronavirus pandemic, they noted. And many who are in vulnerable situations, some speakers said, have been made even more vulnerable, exposing them to abuse and even suicide, because they don’t have their safe haven – school – to turn to.

Mari Barke, an elected member of the Orange County Board of Education and Jeff Barke’s wife, told the crowd, to “keep fighting” to reopen schools.

“Parents are in the best position to make decisions for their children,” Mari Barke said.

Last week, her board voted to file a lawsuit against Newsom to force a reopening of schools. Fellow Trustee Ken Williams also addressed the crowd, invoking God and talking about “the fight for the children.”

The rally was organized by Cecilia Iglesias, a former Santa Ana councilwoman and former School Board member who works for the California Policy Center, a libertarian think tank that focuses on issues like pension reform and charter schools. The Center runs four chapters of the Parent Union in Southern California. Iglesias said she hopes to hold similar rallies in other counties.

“Our call is a call to action, to let parents choose,” Iglesias said prior to the rally. “We’re suggesting: open up the schools, following safety guidelines, and give parents the choice.”

Read more about These O.C. parents have a message for Gov. Newsom, teachers’ unions: ‘Open up the schools.’ This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

Line coach on San Juan Hills High School football team suspected of soliciting students for child pornography

Investigators believe an offensive line coach for a San Juan Capistrano high school football team propositioned multiple students to participate in child pornography, and sought the public’s help in identifying additional possible victims after he was arrested Wednesday, Oct. 30.

Cole Austin Cazel, 22, of San Juan Capistrano, was arrested at about 12:30 p.m. on suspicion of contacting minors for the purpose of soliciting child pornography, Orange County Sheriff’s Department officials said in a news release. He was held at the Orange County Jail in lieu of $100,000 bail.

Cazel had worked as an offensive line coach for the San Juan Hills High School football team and had regular contact with minors the past four years, the OCSD said.


Deputies arrested Cole Austin Cazel, 22, of San Juan Capistrano, Wednesday, Oct. 30, on suspicion of soliciting minors to take part in child pornography. He had worked as an offensive line coach for San Juan Hills High School, and has had regular contact with students for the past four years. (Photo courtesy of the Orange County Sheriff’s Department)

Deputies launched an investigation after receiving an anonymous tip suggesting he had victimized multiple students.

Authorities believe there may be other victims who have not yet been identified. Deputies asked anyone with information regarding their investigation to call 714-647-7419.

Anonymous tips can also be left with OC Crime Stoppers by dialing 855-847-6227 or visiting occrimestoppers.org.

Read more about Line coach on San Juan Hills High School football team suspected of soliciting students for child pornography This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

How does Riley McCoy, the girl who can’t go out in the sun, have a high school life?

This is the third story in an occasional series that will follow Riley McCoy through her senior year at Dana Hills High. Read Part 1. Read Part 2.

She let word slip out, like high school kids do, that she wanted to go to the winter formal with Kenny. A little rumor just to test the waters. Would Kenny consider going with her?

  • Riley McCoy hugs her friend Katie Swanson at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy hugs her friend Katie Swanson at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy, left, talks with her friends Shelby Angel and Katie Swanson, right, at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy, left, talks with her friends Shelby Angel and Katie Swanson, right, at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy, right, performed in Dana Hills High School’s production of Bye Bye Birdie. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy, right, performed in Dana Hills High School’s production of Bye Bye Birdie. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy points to the stage during dress rehearsal night for Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy points to the stage during dress rehearsal night for Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy, left, talks with her friends Shelby Angel and Katie Swanson, right, at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy, left, talks with her friends Shelby Angel and Katie Swanson, right, at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy talks with her friend Kenny Maddox backstage during dress rehearsal for Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy talks with her friend Kenny Maddox backstage during dress rehearsal for Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Kenny Maddox gives a hug to Riley McCoy backstage during dress rehearsal for Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Kenny Maddox gives a hug to Riley McCoy backstage during dress rehearsal for Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy performed during Broadway Night at Dana Hills High School in November. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy performed during Broadway Night at Dana Hills High School in November. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy dances with her friends Shelby Angel, left, and Katie Swanson, right, at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG))

    Riley McCoy dances with her friends Shelby Angel, left, and Katie Swanson, right, at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG))

  • Riley McCoy talks with her friends Katie Swanson, left, and Shelby Angel, right, at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy talks with her friends Katie Swanson, left, and Shelby Angel, right, at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy, right, talks with Sophia Ayrouth and Emmy Fry during a dance class at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy, right, talks with Sophia Ayrouth and Emmy Fry during a dance class at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Reily McCoy, left, watches a video with friends during dress rehearsal night for Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Reily McCoy, left, watches a video with friends during dress rehearsal night for Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Reily McCoy watchess backstage during dress rehearsal night for Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Reily McCoy watchess backstage during dress rehearsal night for Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy performed during Broadway Night at Dana Hills High School in November. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy performed during Broadway Night at Dana Hills High School in November. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy, right, talks with Sophia Ayrouth and Emmy Fry during a dance class at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy, right, talks with Sophia Ayrouth and Emmy Fry during a dance class at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy, left, dances with her friend Katie Swanson at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy, left, dances with her friend Katie Swanson at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy, left, talks with her friends Shelby Angel and Katie Swanson, right, at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Riley McCoy, left, talks with her friends Shelby Angel and Katie Swanson, right, at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Reily McCoy performs in Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Reily McCoy performs in Bye Bye Birdie at Dana Hills High School. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Riley McCoy and Kenny Maddox went to the Dana Hills High School’s winter formal together. (Courtesy of McCoy Family)

    Riley McCoy and Kenny Maddox went to the Dana Hills High School’s winter formal together. (Courtesy of McCoy Family)

of

Expand

So smart, funny, handsome in a Kenny sort of way. Did you know Kenny is going to join the Army after high school? Then he’s going to become a famous actor.

Kenny. Kenny. Kenny.

With about a month to go before Dana Hills High School’s winter formal, Riley McCoy not-so-subtly let it be known among her friends that it sure would be nice if Kenny Maddox were available for a certain Saturday night in January. This has been a memorable year for Riley, who has a rare disease (xeroderma pigmentosum or “xp”) that prevents her from going outside in the sun, and a brain disorder that is slowly sapping her cognition and coordination. She was voted homecoming queen, and she sang in the school play.

But the winter formal? When you’re a high school kid trying be just like everybody else, the winter formal means everything.

The winter formal means Kenny.

“I’ve never had a guy say yes to me before,” Riley said.

She hoped Kenny would be the kind of first date she would remember forever.

And then the word came back, like a stiff winter wind down the hallway at Dana Hills High.

Kenny might be going with someone else. Or Kenny might be going with a group of boys. Or Kenny might not be going at all.

In a life filled with cruel reality, Riley McCoy had to deal with the possibility that if she asked Kenny Maddox to go to the dance with her, he might say no.

With a little help from her friends

Here’s the question: Is Riley McCoy lucky to be surrounded by angels, or has Riley made angels of everyone around her?

By all accounts, Riley is having an amazing senior year at the school her parents picked primarily because its common areas are mostly indoors. She won homecoming queen by a landslide, and the outpouring of love as the crowd chanted her name is, arguably, one of the greatest moments in school history. She is involved in student government. She sang in “Bye Bye Birdie.”

She couldn’t do any of it without her parents, teachers and friends meticulously planning and orchestrating every move she makes.What time is it? Where is the sun? What does the ultraviolet meter say? How many windows are there? What kind of lighting is in the room? How would she escape in case of emergency?

They have created a full life for her when it would have been so easy to protect her indoors.

Pam McCoy, Riley’s mother, remembers the first time Riley went out with a friend at Dana Hills High. Riley was a freshman, and she told her mom that another girl had invited her to go out for pizza. Pam thought the other girl wouldn’t show.

But the girl came. Pam, wary of the way new people treat her daughter, watched that girl closely.

“A boy with Down syndrome came in,” Pam said. “She kept her gaze on him until he noticed her. She smiled at him. I knew from that point she was something special.”

That girl’s name is, aptly, Shelby Angel.

Shelby wants to study psychology in college. Whenever Riley complains about the lack of sun in her life, Shelby has an answer ready.

“Everything good always happens at night,” Shelby tells Riley.

Shelby was there when Riley told her: “I’m going to get cancer.” But in true Riley McCoy optimistic fashion, she explained that when she gets cancer, the doctors are going to take the cancer out of her. For the record, it’s not likely she will get skin cancer because she is so careful wearing protective clothing whenever she has to go outside in the sun. It is much more likely her brain will function less and less until she loses vital skills.

Shelby says she tries to block out thoughts of Riley’s future. People with Riley’s particular strain of xp (accompanied by neurological degeneration), have shortened life spans and often lose the ability to talk or even swallow.

Riley was sad when she found out that the Best Buddies (a program for special needs students like her) have a day at Disneyland. For Riley, the key word in that sentence is “day.” Some of her friends at school – Shelby, Jimmy Quick and Katie Swanson – promised to meet her at Disneyland at night.

“Those kids are totally amazing,” said Robin Triepke-Harris, who is Riley’s one-on-one special education aide at school. “They have really kind hearts. They genuinely care about other people. Riley feels all the love.”

Shelby, Jimmy and Katie have made it a habit of dropping by the McCoy house on Saturday nights. They’ve taken Riley to the movies, dinner, Christmas boat parade, amusement parks and backyard pools – all under the light of the moon. Sometimes, they just come over to watch television.

Along the way, because she is a teenage girl, Jimmy got a lot of Riley’s attention.

Before Kenny, there was Jimmy.

All the girls had crushes on Jimmy. He met Riley in a dance class. He was a sophomore. She was a freshman. Riley was awkward, stumbling through the moves, but she kept trying. Jimmy was impressed with that.

“I have never met someone with such a positive attitude,” said Jimmy, who is now a freshman at Belmont University in Tennessee. “Riley has so much light in her. She projects light on people. She makes people happy.”

Jimmy became dinner table conversation at the McCoy house. And breakfast conversation, and lunch conversation and every conversation in between.

Jimmy. Jimmy. Jimmy.

During a pep rally when Jimmy was a senior at Dana Hills, a video showed a series of girls describing their first crush. “Jimmy Quick,” the first girl said. Five times in a row, each girl said, “Jimmy Quick.”

Then Jimmy’s face flashed on the video screen.

“Sorry,” Jimmy said, “I like boys.”

Jimmy Quick felt comfortable enough in the Dana Hills environment to come out during a school assembly.

“There was a lot of cheering,” Jimmy said. “It was a good thing. There is something about Dana that is so special.”

Riley had to try to wrap her head around the idea that Jimmy would never be her boyfriend.

Pam McCoy said Riley watched “Glee,” a show featuring more than one gay teenager. “She knew what gay was,” Pam said.

Riley approached Jimmy after the assembly. “I still think the world of you,” she said.

Answer, then the question

Riley had a decision to make. Should she still ask Kenny to the winter formal even after she heard that he might not be going this year?

Kenny met Riley in drama class last year. The teacher had given them an assignment to perform a scene from “High School Musical 2.” Kenny already had a partner, but when he saw Riley didn’t have one, he asked if he could do the scene with her.

He played Troy, and she played Gabriella – high school sweethearts. Those roles were played by Zac Efron and Vanessa Hudgens in the movie.

After working on that scene together, Riley was smitten.

Kenny. Kenny. Kenny.

Last month, Kenny heard that Riley might ask him to the dance. At first, he hesitated.

“I was sad,” Riley said.

“Then I started thinking she might not have this opportunity again,” Kenny said.

What happened next is a moment Riley will never forget. Kenny sent Riley a text telling her he would love to go to the dance with her.

Three words can describe her feelings.

Over.

The.

Moon.

“I was very surprised,” Riley said.

Technically, the winter formal is a girl-ask-guy event. So Riley made a poster: “Will you be Troy to my Gabriella?”

Kenny said yes. And she asked him if he would take her to the dance alone, without friends, so it would be – officially – her first date.

Kenny said yes again.

Riley chose dark blue. She wore a floral dress. He wore a vest and a tie. They took photos at Kenny’s house. Riley pinned on his boutonniere. Kenny gave her a white corsage. He took her to Red Robin at the Irvine Spectrum for dinner. The dance was held at AV Irvine.

“I could tell she was the happiest she had ever been,” Kenny said.

They slow danced together. Kenny said they started a few inches apart. He could feel Riley leaning in. By the end, they were hugging tightly.

Amy Valencia, Riley’s friend who helped her make the poster, said the dance was perfect.

“He really showed her a great time,” Amy said. “It was nice to see her so happy. Riley said it was one of the best nights of her life.”

Riley’s mom was near tears.

“I love that Riley sees the world through rose-colored glasses, but, as her mom, I know that things are very different for her than they are for the other kids,” Pam said. “Her future looks bleak, and I’m nervous about Riley’s post-Dana Hills High School life. But right now, my husband and I are just enjoying every moment of Riley having the time of her life. We are so thankful for a kind soul like Kenny to take Riley on such a great night and an amazing date.

“Riley has the greatest taste in friends.”

Powered by WPeMatico

UC regent resigns amid criticism over offensive remark

SAN FRANCISCO >> A University of California regent who was caught on tape last year asking an employee if he could hold her breasts has decided to resign amid growing calls that he step down.

Regent Norman J. Pattiz sent a letter dated Thursday to Regents Chair George Keiffer saying that after 16 years on the board he would retire in February.

His letter, which was first reported by the San Francisco Chronicle, did not mention the sexual harassment accusation.

Keiffer responded in a letter that thanked Pattiz for announcing his retirement, adding that “after so many years you deserve a break.”

Pattiz is the founder of America’s largest radio network, Westwood One, and CEO of Courtside Entertainment Group, which produces radio shows and podcasts.

The controversy became public in October 2016, when comedian Heather McDonald aired comments that Pattiz had made to her while taping a podcast commercial in May 2016 for a memory-foam bra.

She flubbed some of her lines, and Pattiz asked, “Can I hold your breasts? Would that help?” and showed his hands, saying, “These are memory foam.”

Pattiz subsequently apologized for the remarks and said they were meant as a joke.

The University of California promptly created new guidelines on sexual harassment for its governing board in response to outrage over Pattiz’ behavior. Under that policy, all regents are now required to take the university’s training program in sexual harassment prevention, as do employees at UC’s 10 campuses.

Students revived calls for his resignation in recent weeks as women across the country have spoken out about sexual misconduct by powerful men. Students protested at a November UC Regents meeting, demanding he be removed.

Earlier this month, several regents including Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom raised questions about whether the Board of Regents had dealt too lightly with Pattiz.

Powered by WPeMatico

Get to know Irvine Public School Foundation’s Neda Eaton

Maybe Neda Eaton is driven to help kids because she remembers what it was like to be young and need help. She was 9 years old when her family pulled up stakes in their home country of Iran and resettled in Corona del Mar. “Not speaking any English, it was kind of rough for me to make friends,” remembers Eaton, who today is the president and CEO of Irvine Public School Foundation.

Sports – volleyball is her game –became Eaton’s way of fitting in to her adopted country. By college she was coaching kids, many of whom came from “rough backgrounds,” she says. “I was drawn to them because I related to them. I didn’t have a rough background, but I did have my struggles fitting in.”

She graduated summa cum laude from Pepperdine University with a master’s degree in psychology; her goal was finding a career in social services and nonprofits. And that she did. After successful turns in administrative positions at Olive Crest Homes and Services for Abused Children and Boys Town USA – “like Olive Crest on steroids” – the position at IPSF came up. As the mother of Kyra, 10, and Gavin, 12, both students in Irvine schools, Eaton says working close to home and being able to make an impact in her own community was a no-brainer.

As CEO, she directs the development of programs and initiatives that enrich the education of the 33,000 students in the Irvine Unified School District. Since Eaton took the reins, the foundation’s role has expanded from providing limited educational enhancements to creating a $4 million annual juggernaut, funding critical school programs.

“I fell in love with the mission,” she says. “We do a lot of really great things, and try to serve a wide array of students. The overachievers, that’s great and we want to make sure we serve them, but also the students who need a little extra or students who can’t afford to take an after-school class because parents work or aren’t around. We are there to support every student and fit their needs.”

IMG_7170Where I live: Quail Hill in Irvine.

Why I live here: We live in Irvine because of the great family community. We live in Quail Hill because it is in Irvine, but the closest I can get to Laguna Beach!

Favorite local store: Gorjana. I like their pieces because they are not crazy gaudy.

Favorite restaurant: For romantic, Habana in Costa Mesa. My favorite sushi is Hamamori. We take the kids with us everywhere we go. Ever since they were little they have gone with us – they know to behave and try different kinds of foods.

My sanctuary: The beach, definitely. I’m there probably three days a week. My sport is beach volleyball. I’ve got the same group of players – everyone played either professionally or in college – and we meet early mornings and play. As a family we go down there too to play, and we also like stand-up paddleboards.

What my kids teach me: My kids taught me and continue to teach me to be true to myself. Maybe it’s an age thing – they’re not quite teenagers yet – but they are who they are. They voice their opinions and they are honest. My daughter is super creative so if she wants to dress a certain way, she will. They have taught me the importance of that as well.

Angels or Dodgers: Angels.

Red or white: Definitely red – a deep, bold Cab.

Why this interview was not done at a wine bar: I don’t know. Let’s go! Well, OK, next time …

On my nightstand: Too many books I don’t have enough time to read, and I have a journal that my daughter and I keep and pass back and forth to each other. I write in it, I give it to her; she writes in it, she gives it back to me. I think it allows us to reflect, especially when things are busy in the household – the kids, the dog, work and all that stuff. I love hearing how her day went. It is interesting to see what she chooses to write about, to see what is on her mind.

Pet peeve: People who aren’t generous. It really bothers me. I don’t know
what it is. I think maybe it’s culturally the way I was raised. I notice it. People who could give but don’t. Stinginess in general.

What surprises people about me: That I am actually kind of a homebody and an introvert. My job requires me to be so social; people are surprised to hear I would rather stay in, or just not talk. My kids make fun of me sometimes. We’ll be out, just us, and you might recognize people you would need to have a conversation with. I might hide behind my sunglasses and hat, or something. They’ll be, like, “Mom’s hiding, being antisocial again!”

Passionate about: Sounds cliché to say, but making a difference. I’m passionate about what I do.

 

Powered by WPeMatico