High school football: Photos from Saturday’s championship games


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Take a look at the great action and exciting moments from the local high school football championship games Saturday night.

There were a lot of exciting matchups as teams battled for the biggest prizes in the CIF Southern Section and L.A. City Section. The Southern California News Group has images from games throughout the area, and all of our coverage can be found online on the high school sports pages.

  • Orange Lutheran players celebrate their victory over Alemany in the CIF-SS Division 2 championship game Saturday November 27, 2021.(Photo by Andy Holzman, Contributing Photographer)

  • Orange Lutheran head coach Rod Sherman celebrates as his team defeats Alemany in the CIF-SS Division 2 championship game Saturday November 27, 2021.(Photo by Andy Holzman, Contributing Photographer)

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Whicker: Mater Dei satisfies its hunger for consuming quarterbacks in Division 1 win over Servite

LONG BEACH — It was like the old joke about the two pass rushers who played a Thanksgiving game against an outmatched line.

“Let’s meet at the quarterback,” they told each other. “And make a wish.”

Mater Dei’s Tanner Williams and David Bailey kept meeting Servite’s Noah Fifita almost as soon as the snapped football reached his hand. They brought a lot of traffic with them.

When the Division 1 Southern Section final was over, Servite had one 28-yard touchdown drive and not much else. Mater Dei was able to win, 27-7, without a passing touchdown until Elijah Brown found C.J. Williams in the corner of the end zone, late in the fourth quarter.

It was the Monarchs’ first CIF title since 2018 which, for them, constitutes the breaking of a famine.

But it also preserved their chances of winning a tangible state championship and a mythical national title. It was also a massive contrast to their previous meeting in the fall, a breathless 46-37 win on Oct. 23.

“I love our pass rush,” said cornerback Cameron Sidney. “Our D-line always steps up, our inside linebackers always take over. I think all phases of our defense are on the same platform. And the offense helped us a little bit, hanging on to the ball like they did.”


Servite tight end Keyan Burnett, right, can’t reach an overthrown pass as Mater Dei defensive back Zabien Brown covers in the CIF-SS Division 1 football championship in Long Beach on Friday, November 26, 2021. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

Williams, a sophomore, had two sacks, and Bailey, a senior playing with a bandaged-up wrist, had one-and-a-half. They had four solo tackles each. Fifita, so effective as a runner in Servite’s semifinal win at St. John Bosco, gained 25 yards but lost 44 while he was sacked four times, and he threw for only 86 yards.

Although Tetairoa McMillan had an interception for Servite and caught a 4-yard touchdown in the first quarter, he had to settle for eight catches and 68 yards. “Our job was to limit him to no catches,” Sidney said. “He got some, but we did a pretty good job limiting him, and that’s one of the reasons we won.”

In the Oct. 23 game that was so electric it briefly knocked out the lights at Santa Ana Stadium, McMillan snagged 15 balls for 163 yards, and Fifita hit 26 of 41 passes for 306 yards.

The Friars tried to plug the middle of the field against Brown and played “off” coverage to limit long strikes. The Monarchs were agreeable to that. Raleek Brown chugged 164 yards on 23 carries against the light defensive boxes, and Ajon Bryant clicked off a 27-yard touchdown run. Elijah Brown only passed 14 times and his only 20-yard completion was the 27-yarder to Williams at the end.

In the third quarter, Servite moved the ball 7 yards — backwards. Fifita did hit a remarkable pass to Michael Welsh in the third quarter, but the officials’ flags indicated how they did it. Welsh was out of bounds and came back in for the catch, an illegal touching penalty.

“We put in a few new stunts for this game,” Williams said, “and from that point it just was a matter of execution.”

“We did change some things, really tried to double T-Mac more, but mainly the kids just got after it,” said Eric Johnson, Mater Dei’s defensive coordinator. “I thought we really made it hard for them to drive.”

Still, Fifita’s bottomless spirit was not broken. In the fourth quarter he was getting body-slammed on every snap, and yet converted a third-and-10 and then a third-and-19. A touchdown would have cut Mater Dei’s lead to a touchdown with more than four-and-a-half minutes remaining. Instead, Jeilani Davis picked off Fifita’s pass on fourth-and-10.

Mater Dei last played in this game two years ago, led St. John Bosco 28-5 and lost 39-34. There was no chance for payback in 2020, with COVID-19. The two did play during the five-game spring schedule and the Monarchs won that. Still, their hands were itchy for trophies.

“I don’t even know how to explain how it feels,” Sidney said. “This is all we were thinking about, after 2019, my sophomore year. We did our thing during the five games, but we all felt like we needed to come back and get this.”

If the goal was to make this game as one-sided as the stadium they played it in, they did that, too.

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High school football playoffs: All of Friday’s scores, plus the schedule and matchups for the championship games

All of the football scores from Friday’s games in the CIF-SS and L.A. City Section playoffs, plus the schedule and matchups for the championship games.

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

CIF-SS

Friday’s results

Semifinals

DIVISION 1

Mater Dei 21, Centennial 16

Servite 40, St. John Bosco 21

DIVISION 2

Alemany 56, Inglewood 30

Orange Lutheran 42, Sierra Canyon 40

DIVISION 3

Apple Valley 35, Eastvale Roosevelt 28

Serra 34, Etiwanda 27 (OT)

DIVISION 4

Long Beach Poly 35, Cypress 0

St. Francis 20, La Serna 0

DIVISION 5

Valencia 24, Chino Hills 21

Oaks Christian 24, El Modena 14

DIVISION 6

Temecula Valley 37, Camarillo 31 (OT)

Newport Harbor 20, Dominguez 19

DIVISION 7

Aquinas 31, Pasadena 21

St. Pius X-St. Matthias 46, Mira Costa 43

DIVISION 8

Serrano 18, Highland 13

Buena 30, Silverado 26

DIVISION 9

St. Margaret’s 23, Claremont 13

Colony 28, Ventura 0

DIVISION 10

St. Anthony 49, Salesian 48

Northview 28, Palmdale 14

DIVISION 11

Long Beach Jordan 26, Twentynine Palms 20

Northwood 16, Vista del Lago 12

DIVISION 12

Compton 52, Tahquitz 35

Quartz Hill 23, Woodbridge 0

DIVISION 13

Montclair 28, South Pasadena 21

Arlington 38, Anaheim 14

DIVISION 14

Rialto 56, Indian Springs 38

Loara 28, Alhambra 19

8-MAN

DIVISION 1

Championship

Cate 50, Grace Brethren 30

DIVISION 2

Semifinals

CSDR 62, Avalon 51

Coast Union at Faith Baptist, Saturday, 1 p.m.

CHAMPIONSHIPS SCHEDULE

Nov. 26-27

Games start 7 p.m. unless noted

Division 1

Mater Dei (10-0) vs. Servite (10-2) at Veterans Stadium, Long Beach, Friday, 7:30 p.m.

Dates and times for the other finals are TBD

Division 2: Orange Lutheran (9-4) at Alemany (8-3)

Division 3: Serra (8-4) at Apple Valley (10-3)

Division 4: Long Beach Poly (10-3) at St. Francis (10-2)

Division 5: Oaks Christian (7-6) at Valencia (7-4)

Division 6: Newport Harbor (6-7) at Temecula Valley (10-3)

Division 7: Aquinas (8-5) at St. Pius X-St. Matthias (11-2)

Division 8: Serrano (10-3) at Buena (10-3)

Division 9: St. Margaret’s (9-4) at Colony (6-6)

Division 10: St. Anthony (9-4) at Northview (7-6)

Division 11: Long Beach Jordan (8-5) at Northwood (8-5)

Division 12: Quartz Hill (7-4) at Compton (7-5)

Division 13: Montclair (9-4) at Arlington (5-8)

Division 14: Rialto (7-6) at Loara (7-6)

8-MAN FOOTBALL

Championship, Nov. 26 or 27

CSDR vs. TBD

L.A. CITY

Friday’s results

Semifinals

OPEN DIVISION

Birmingham 37, Banning 0

San Pedro 33, Palisades 17

DIVISION I

Canoga Park 43, Dorsey 20

Venice 28, Reseda 20

DIVISION II

El Camino Real 27, Westchester 18

L.A. Hamilton 21, Fairfax 13

DIVISION III

Taft 20, Narbonne 14

Panorama 39, San Fernando 13

8-MAN

Saturday

Championship

North Valley Military (8-2) vs. Sotomayor (6-2) at Birmingham HS, Saturday, 6 p.m.

CHAMPIONSHIPS SCHEDULE

Nov. 26-27

Games start 7 p.m. unless noted

Open Division

San Pedro (10-1) vs. Birmingham (7-5), Nov. 27, at Pierce College

Dates, times, locations for the other finals are TBD

Division I: Venice (7-3) vs. Canoga Park (8-4)

Division II: El Camino Real (5-7) vs. L.A. Hamilton (9-3)

Division III: Taft (6-7) vs. Panorama (8-5)

 

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Dallas boy, 9, is youngest of 10 killed at Houston festival

By RANDALL CHASE and MIKE CATALINI

A promising college student expected to graduate in the spring. A visitor from Washington state. And a 9-year-old boy who had been in a coma for more than a week.

The death toll stemming from a crowd surge during a Travis Scott performance at the Astroworld music festival in Houston rose to 10 on Sunday. The latest victim is also the youngest, 9-year-old Ezra Blount, of Dallas, who had been in a medically induced coma since Nov. 5.

The dead ranged from 9 to 27 years old. Hundreds more were injured.

City officials are investigating what caused the pandemonium at the sold-out event attended by about 50,000 fans. Scott, a rapper known for his high-energy concerts, has said he would cover funeral costs for the victims.

‘THEIR PRECIOUS YOUNG SON’

Ben Crump, an attorney representing the Blount family, said in a news release Sunday night that he was “committed to seeking answers and justice” on behalf of the family.

“The Blount family tonight is grieving the incomprehensible loss of their precious young son,” Crump said. “This should not have been the outcome of taking their son to a concert, what should have been a joyful celebration. Ezra’s death is absolutely heartbreaking.”

Treston Blount, Ezra’s father, described what happened Nov. 5 in a post on a GoFundMe page that he set up to help defray Ezra’s medical expenses. He said Ezra was sitting on his shoulders when a crowd surge crushed them. The father lost consciousness and when he came to, Ezra was missing, Blount said. A frantic search ensued until Ezra was eventually found at the hospital, severely injured.

The child incurred severe damage to his brain, kidney, and liver after being “kicked, stepped on, and trampled, and nearly crushed to death,” according to a lawsuit his family has filed against Scott and the event’s organizer, Live Nation. The Blount family is seeking at least $1 million in damages.

‘SUPER GLUE OF THE FAMILY’

Bharti Shahani, a high-achieving student at Texas A&M University, died Wednesday night, attorney James Lassiter said during a news conference with the family.

Shahani had been hospitalized since she was critically injured at the concert.

Bharti’s relatives described her as diligent in her electronics systems engineering studies and someone who always thought of others — including that she had signed up to donate her organs when she died.

Astroworld was supposed to be a rare escape, her sister Namrata Shahani said.

“For the first time in her life, she just wanted to have fun, and that was taken from her,” Namrata said.

Namrata said her sister’s last words to her were, “Are you OK?”

Her cousin, Mohit Bellani, attended the concert too. He said Shahani had two heart attacks on the way to the hospital. “Bharti was the glue of the family. She was the super glue of the family” he said.

‘LOVED HIS MOM’

Franco Patino, 21, was working toward a mechanical engineering technology degree at the University of Dayton, with a minor in human movement biomechanics, his father, Julio Patino, told The Associated Press. He was a member of Alpha Psi Lambda, a Hispanic interest fraternity, and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, and was working in an engineering co-op program.

Patino described his son as a charismatic, energetic leader who was active in his community and intent on helping people with disabilities. His son was working on a new medical device and wanted to find a way to help his mother walk again after she was severely injured in an automobile accident in Mexico two years ago, Patino said.

Through tears, Patino described how his son — who enjoyed weight lifting, football and rugby — used his strength to break a door and free his mom from the wreckage.

“He loved his mom,” Patino said. “He said everything that he was doing, it was trying to help his mom. The entire goal.”

Julio Patino, of Naperville, Illinois, was in London on business when the phone rang around 3 a.m. He answered it and heard his wife, Teresita, crying. She said someone had called from a hospital about Franco and that a doctor would be calling her soon. After 30 minutes, she called back with the doctor on the line.

“The doctor was giving us the news that our son had passed away,” Patino said.

Patino said he had last spoken with his son about 2 p.m. Friday, when he reassured his father he was fine.

“I just said, ‘OK, just be careful,’” Patino said.

‘HUGE HOLE IN OUR LIVES’

Jacob “Jake” Jurinek, 20, was a junior at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, where he was “pursuing his passion for art and media,” his family said in a statement Sunday. He was just short of his 21st birthday.

He was attending the concert with Patino, his friend and former high school football teammate, according to Patino’s father, Julio Patino. He was deeply committed to his family and was known as “Big Jake” by his younger cousins.

He will be missed by his father, Ron Jurinek, with whom Jake became especially close after his mother died in 2011.

“In the decade since, Jake and Ron were inseparable – attending White Sox and Blackhawks games, sharing their love of professional wrestling, and spending weekends with extended family and friends at Jake’s favorite place, the family cottage in Southwestern Michigan,” the family’s statement said.

“We are all devastated and are left with a huge hole in our lives,” his father, Ron Jurinek, added in an emailed statement.

‘GOOD STUDENT, ATHLETE, SO POLITE’

Memorial High School ninth-grader John Hilgert, 14, was the youngest of those who died. Mourners began tying green ribbons around trees at the school over the weekend in his memory.

He was at the concert with classmate Robby Hendrix, whose mother, Tracy Faulkner, spoke with the Houston Chronicle. The boys had hoped to get a good spot to watch the show.

“Everything about that night was a tragedy,” Faulkner told the newspaper. “John was a good student and athlete and so polite. He was the sweetest and smartest young man.”

‘LIFE OF THE PARTY’

Madison Dubiski, 23, lived in Houston. She was a varsity cheerleader in high school and member of a community service group called the National Charity League, according to a former classmate who spoke to the Houston Chronicle.

“She was definitely the life of the party and loved by so many people,” Lauren Vogler told the newspaper.

She was her mom’s best friend and she loved watching her brother play sports, family friend Claudia Sierra said.

‘HARD-WORKING MAN’

Mirza “Danish” Baig, who identified himself on Facebook as a district manager for AT&T, and appeared to be a devoted Dallas Cowboys fan, was among those who died at the the concert, his brother Basil Baig said on Facebook.

“He was (an) innocent young soul who would always put others before him. He was a hard-working man who loved his family and took care of us. He was there in a heartbeat for anything. He always had a solution to everything,” Basil Baig told ABC News.

Baig’s funeral was held Sunday in Colleyville in the Dallas-Forth Worth area. Messages left with Basil Baig were not returned.

County officials identified him as Mirza Baig, but his brother said on Facebook he went by Danish. He was 27.

LOVED TO DANCE

Brianna Rodriguez’s family told People magazine that she was among those who perished at the concert. She was 16, a student at Heights High School and loved dancing, according to the family the magazine spoke with. Her family has not responded to a message left by AP.

Outsider her school, pink ribbons and balloons adorned the fence, spelling out “Bri.”

“Brianna was someone who performed with the band and was someone who could always make anyone smile,” the Heights High School band said in a tweet.

Her high school dance team remembered her in an Instagram post, saying that she was with the group for three years, served as the junior social officer and “never failed to put a smile on everyone’s face.

“She was a wonderful friend, teammate, dancer, sister, daughter, and leader. The bulldog community is deeply saddened and will honor her in every way we can. We love you Brianna,” the team said in the post.

COMPUTER SCIENCE STUDENT

Axel Acosta Avila, 21, was a computer science major at Western Washington University. His father, Edgar Acosta, told KOMO-TV his son was among the victims who died at the festival.

The school in Bellingham, Washington, released a statement Sunday: “By all accounts, Axel was a young man with a vibrant future. We are sending our condolences to his family on this very sad day.”

Acosta Avila was initially identified by family with the single last name, Acosta, but his father said Monday that his full name should be used.

ASPIRING BORDER AGENT

Rodolfo “Rudy” Pena, 23, of Laredo, Texas, was a student at Laredo College and wanted to be Border Patrol agent, his friend Stacey Sarmiento said. She described him as a people person. Officials identified him as Rodolfo Pena, but friends called him Rudy.

“Rudy was a close friend of mine,” she said. “We met in high school. He was an athlete. … He brought happiness anywhere he went. He was easy to get along with. It was like positive vibes from him at all times.”

“We all came to have a good time … it was just horrible in there,” she added.

Associated Press writers Jamie Stengle and Juan Lozano in Houston contributed to this report. Chase reported from Dover, Delaware, and Catalini reported from Trenton, New Jersey.

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Whicker: UCLA’s OT victory over Villanova brings Pauley Pavilion back to life

LOS ANGELES — Even before COVID-19 slammed the doors of Pauley Pavilion 20 months ago, it was becoming the most ornate study hall on campus.

UCLA basketball? A night in Pauley promised quiet and plenty of elbow room, and reliable Internet service. According to Dad, they used to be good, but the Bruins hadn’t been to the Final Four since 2008.

Today’s typical freshman was 5 years old then. All he knew, growing up, was a loss to St. Bonaventure in the NCAA Tournament, home losses to Belmont and Liberty that were not made less painful by the fact that Belmont and Liberty were better teams, and a wasted conference season after Steve Alford was fired on Dec. 31, 2018.

That preceded a typically clumsy coaching search, in which UCLA went after reigning NCAA championship coach Tony Bennett of Virginia, got played by TCU’s Jamie Dixon and Tennessee’s Rick Barnes, and wound up bringing in Mick Cronin. He was known for steel-driving defensive teams at Cincinnati who squeezed basketballs into dust when it was time to make big baskets.

Cut to Friday night, for an 8:30 p.m. game in the middle of November, the type of game that normally wouldn’t get the typical Bruin out of the library. The line of kids stretched from the front of Pauley all the way to the top of the hill next to the tennis center. There was a DJ, and there was Cronin in the late afternoon delivering doughnuts, and there was Athletic Director Martin Jarmond as well. And when the doors opened and a top-five game began, there was desperation and passion in the air that hadn’t been heard or seen since Lonzo Ball’s drive-by season of 2016-17, and before that, who knows?

“The students bring the energy,” Cronin said later. “The traffic stops everyone else. But they can walk.”

The traffic will not be the usual disincentive this season. The Bruins got all of this started with last spring’s 11th-seeded run to the Final Four (which required surviving a First Four game). Here, they trailed Villanova, 60-50, with 9:24 left, and inexorably got it into overtime and then won, 86-77.

It was a profound illustration of why they’ve earned the hype, why they seem well-qualified for the moment. More will be known on Nov. 23 when UCLA plays top-ranked Gonzaga in Las Vegas, or when it goes on the road to play Marquette and then meets North Carolina in another neutral-site showdown in Las Vegas.

But maybe we know enough. The second-ranked Bruins had to adjust to the commando effort that every Villanova team brings, every game. They had to find third efforts to get rebounds when second efforts weren’t enough. After that 10-point deficit, they gave fourth-ranked Villanova three baskets the rest of regulation, and when Villanova’s Justin Moore found his way into the lane as he’d done for two hours, Jaylen Clark met him and persuaded him to miss.

That led to a 5-minute overtime that was a little too long for the Wildcats, four of whom played 38 or more minutes. Only one Bruin, Johnny Juzang, clocked in at 40 minutes. The depth is so real that the Bruins won without the injured Cody Riley, one of the best post playmakers in America.

David Singleton came off the bench to hit two 3-pointers in the first half and give UCLA some separation, and he was barely seen again. Myles Johnson, the transfer from Rutgers, got one basket in his 36 minutes and blocked two shots, but one of those blocks was on Moore when it was 69-69 in overtime, and Juzang came down to score and give UCLA the lead it would never lose.

“When you have a whole team coming back like this, it means a lot,” said point guard Tyger Campbell, who absorbed three charges in the second half and overtime and also hit two 3-pointers that cut that 10-point shortfall to four. “I trust them all, one through 13.”

“We can’t be the team that we want to be unless Tyger shoots the ball like that,” Cronin said, but, again, Campbell doesn’t have to be Pete Maravich. He hit five of nine shots and made one turnover in 33 minutes, while dealing with All-Big East point man Collin Gillespie on the other end. Campbell also had four assists, including a drive-and-kick to Juzang that made it 74-69.

Cronin traces the Bruins’ turnaround to defense, which began to improve just before COVID-19 hit in 2020 but took another large step in the run-up to the 2021 NCAA Tournament.

Not since UCLA lost to Oregon State in the Pac-12 Tournament has it lost a game by conventional means, if you consider Jalen Suggs’ half-court shot a happenstance instead of grand strategy.

Even that Pac-12 loss was in overtime. The game before that, USC’s Tahj Eaddy beat the Bruins with a hope and a heave from the corner, in a game UCLA had controlled. So something was happening, even though you had to live deep in the Ostin Center to sense it.

“We have to be better defensively than we were tonight,” Cronin said. “Breakdowns are the things that kill you and we had some of those, and we learned how not to have them last year.

“But they also learned how to win last year and that’s what we talked about in the second half. We knew they had to get stops. But they believe in each other because they had so many games like this in the tournament. And they know I believe in them.”

The Bruins were so stout in the lane that Villanova missed 14 of 22 layups. Add a plus-14 in rebounding, and the people who run Pauley’s ticket booths had better not lose those “Sold Out Tonight” signs. Lord knows how long it took them to scrape off the mold.

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High school football playoffs: Friday’s scores, updated schedule for semifinals


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All of the scores from the CIF-SS and L.A. City football playoff games Friday and the updated schedule and matchups for next week’s semifinals.

CIF-SS

FRIDAY’S SCORES

DIVISION 1

Quarterfinals, Friday

Mater Dei 49, Norco 14

Centennial 62, Mission Viejo 16

Servite 34, Santa Margarita 3

St. John Bosco 63, Los Alamitos 38

DIVISION 2

Quarterfinals, Friday

Alemany 54, Bishop Amat 38

Inglewood 22, Edison 16

Orange Lutheran 38, Corona del Mar 14

Sierra Canyon 48, Vista Murrieta 23

DIVISION 3

Quarterfinals, Friday (unless noted)

Glendora at Apple Valley, Saturday, 7 p.m.

Eastvale Roosevelt 17, Rancho Cucamonga 7

Gardena Serra 34, Foothill 7

Etiwanda 28, Loyola 21

DIVISION 4

Quarterfinals, Friday (unless noted)

Long Beach Poly 49, Upland 3

Bonita vs. Cypress at Western HS, Saturday, 5 p.m.

La Serna 24, Lawndale 20

St. Francis 28, Chaparral 14

DIVISION 5

Quarterfinals, Friday

Valencia 24, La Habra 6

Chino Hills 15, Summit 8

El Modena 33, Beaumont 14

Oaks Christian 24, Riverside North 21

DIVISION 6

Quarterfinals, Friday

Camarillo 23, Culver City 21

Temecula Valley 27, Norte Vista 14

Newport Harbor 49, Santa Barbara 14

Dominguez 40, Santa Ana 34

DIVISION 7

Quarterfinals, Friday

Pasadena 41, La Mirada 31

Aquinas 35, Leuzinger 34

Mira Costa 41, Alta Loma 14

St. Pius X-St. Matthias 34, Rio Hondo Prep 20

DIVISION 8

Quarterfinals, Friday

Highland 44, California 12

Serrano 42, Ramona 21

Silverado 56, Elsinore 21

Buena 24, El Dorado 20

DIVISION 9

Quarterfinals, Friday

Claremont 38, Laguna Beach 7

St. Margaret’s 38, San Dimas 28

Colony 52, Western 27

Ventura 35, Rancho Mirage 19

DIVISION 10

Quarterfinals, Friday (unless noted)

Salesian 31, Fillmore 21

St. Anthony 49, Katella 17

Northview 42, Kaiser 13

Palmdale vs. Covina at Covina District Field, Saturday, 7:30 p.m.

DIVISION 11

Quarterfinals, Friday

Twentynine Palms 28, Village Christian 24

Long Beach Jordan 34, Granite Hills 27

Vista del Lago 30, Torrance 0

Northwood 48, Riverside Poly 20

DIVISION 12

Quarterfinals, Friday

Compton 24, Walnut 21

Tahquitz 20, Victor Valley 14 (2OT)

Quartz Hill 41, Pasadena Poly 34

Woodbridge 48, Rosemead 14

DIVISION 13

Quarterfinals, Friday

South Pasadena 49, Western Christian 6

Montclair 48, San Gabriel 12

Anaheim 41, San Bernardino 33

Arlington 35, Heritage Christian 24

DIVISION 14

Quarterfinals, Friday

Indian Springs 22, Hawthorne 15

Rialto 50, Garey 35

Alhambra 21, Anza Hamilton 6

Loara 21, Pomona 7

8-MAN

DIVISION 1

Semifinals, Friday (unless noted)

Thacher at Grace Brethren (6-2), Saturday, 1 p.m.

Cate 21, Sage Hill 16

DIVISION 2

Quarterfinals, Friday (unless noted)

CSDR 84, Lancaster Desert Christian 12

Avalon at Santa Maria Valley Christian, Saturday, 5 p.m.

Coast Union 43, Hesperia Christian 42

Faith Baptist 60, Lancaster Baptist 0

CIF-SS

SCHEDULE

DIVISION 1

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

Mater Dei (9-0) at Centennial (11-0)

Servite (9-2) at St. John Bosco (10-1)

DIVISION 2

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

Alemany (7-3) at Inglewood (10-0)

Orange Lutheran (8-4) at Sierra Canyon (6-4)

DIVISION 3

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

TBD vs. Eastvale Roosevelt (8-4)

Serra (7-4) at Etiwanda (12-0)

DIVISION 4

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

TBD at Long Beach Poly (9-3)

La Serna (10-2) at St. Francis (9-2)

DIVISION 5

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

Chino Hills (7-5) at Valencia (6-4)

El Modena (8-4) at Oaks Christian (6-6)

DIVISION 6

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

Temecula Valley (9-3) at Camarillo (8-4)

Dominguez (10-2) at Newport Harbor (5-7)

DIVISION 7

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

Pasadena (9-2) at Aquinas (7-5)

St. Pius X-St. Matthias (10-2) at Mira Costa (7-5)

DIVISION 8

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

Highland (10-2) at Serrano (9-3)

Buena (9-3) at Silverado (7-5)

DIVISION 9

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

Claremont (7-5) at St. Margaret’s (8-4)

Ventura (7-4) at Colony (5-6)

DIVISION 10

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

St. Anthony (8-4) at Salesian (9-3)

TBD vs. Northview (6-6)

DIVISION 11

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

Twentynine Palms (9-1) at Long Beach Jordan (7-5)

Northwood (7-5) at Vista del Lago (9-3)

DIVISION 12

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

Compton (6-5) at Tahquitz (6-4)

Woodbridge (5-7) at Quartz Hill (6-4)

DIVISION 13

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

South Pasadena (7-5) at Montclair (8-4)

Arlington (4-8) at Anaheim (8-4)

DIVISION 14

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19

Indian Springs (5-5) at Rialto (6-6)

Loara (6-6) at Alhambra (6-6)

8-man

DIVISION 1

Championship, Nov. 19 or 20

TBD at Cate (8-1)

DIVISION 2

Semifinals, Nov. 19-20

CSDR (11-0) at TBD

Coast Union (9-2) at Faith Baptist (8-2)

 

L.A. CITY SECTION

FRIDAY’S SCORES

OPEN DIVISION

Quarterfinals, Friday

Banning 37, Garfield 6

Birmingham 52, Lincoln 0

Palisades 60, South Gate 21

San Pedro 42, L.A. Roosevelt 0

DIVISION I

Quarterfinals, Friday

Dorsey 34, Cleveland 28 (2OT)

Canoga Park 27, Arleta 6

Reseda 20, Eagle Rock 13

Venice 47, South East 16

DIVISION II

Quarterfinals, Friday

El Camino Real 35, Jefferson 6

Westchester 49, Hawkins 12

L.A. Hamilton 48, Verdugo Hills 16

Fairfax 25, Maywood CES 14

DIVISION III

Quarterfinals, Friday

Taft 43, View Park 8

Narbonne 28, Manual Arts 8

Panorama 38, Sylmar 7

San Fernando 35, New Designs Watts 0

8 man

Semifinals, Friday

North Valley Military 35, USC Hybrid 14

Sotomayor 50, Los Angeles Jordan 6

L.A. CITY SECTION

SCHEDULE

OPEN DIVISION

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19, 4 p.m.

Birmingham (6-5) at Banning (8-1)

Palisades (11-0) at San Pedro (9-1)

DIVISION I

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19, 4 p.m.

Canoga Park (7-4) at Dorsey (10-2)

Reseda (9-2) at Venice (6-3)

DIVISION II

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19, 4 p.m.

Westchester (4-7) at El Camino Real (4-7)

Los Angeles Hamilton (8-3) Fairfax (5-5)

DIVISION III

Semifinals, Friday, Nov. 19, 4 p.m.

Narbonne (2-8) at Taft (5-7)

Panorama (7-5) at San Fernando (4-6)

8-MAN

Championship, Nov. 20

North Valley Military (8-2) vs. Sotomayor (6-2)

 

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UCLA routs Cal State Bakersfield, but Cody Riley injures knee in season opener

LOS ANGELES — Okay, we’ve seen enough, bring on fourth-ranked Villanova.

The UCLA men’s basketball team has made things look too easy in the past week. Albeit the first act was an exhibition against NCAA Division II Chico State, but Tuesday night’s 95-58 season-opening dismantling of Cal State Bakersfield at Pauley Pavilion actually counted, and maybe more importantly, showed the Bruins are ready for a real test.

However, the Bruins might be without starter Cody Riley after the redshirt senior forward fell awkwardly just eight minutes into the game and grabbed his left knee while rolling back and forth in pain. After several minutes on the court while trainers and staff tended to him, he got up and walked to the bench on his own, but his walk was wobbly as several fans chanted his name.

“We won’t know anything about Cody’s injury until something is confirmed,” UCLA coach Mick Cronin said.

Riley, who averaged 10 points per game last season, grabbed three rebounds in his four minutes and did not return to the game.

It could further impact the depth of the frontcourt. Center Mac Etienne has suffered a potential season-ending injury to his right knee, according to Cronin. The 6-foot-10 freshman is waiting for final confirmation from the medical staff on the diagnosis of the injury and a timetable for return.

Johnny Juzang and Jules Bernard each scored 19 points, and Jaime Jaquez Jr. added 14 as the second-ranked Bruins led wire to wire. Tyger Campbell and Jaylen Clark each scored 10 points for UCLA (1-0).

It didn’t take long for the arena’s public address announcer to begin promoting Friday’s nationally televised showdown against Villanova. The Bruins led 75-39 with 9:16 left and the “#2 UCLA vs. #4 Villanova” graphic was being displayed on the jumbotron encouraging fans to buy their tickets.

“I have a lot of experience with Villanova from my Big East days,” Cronin said. “I know what they’re all about. I understand how hard they play and how physical they are, I thought (tonight) would give us a little bit of a microcosm.”

“We have our work cut out for us on Friday night, I promise you,” he added.

Tuseday’s outcome was never in doubt, and the margin was never less than 28 points over the final nine minutes.

UCLA scored 47 points in the first half, but it was the defense that put things away early. The Bruins (1-0) were up 18-11 at the 10:25 mark in the first half before going on a 26-7 run to finish the half. UCLA held Bakersfield to 26% shooting and just three made field goals over the last 10:02 of the opening frame. The Roadrunners were 3 for 17 during that stretch.

While the Roadrunners were missing, UCLA was converting. The Bruins made eight of their last 15 shots to end the half, including a 3-pointer just before the halftime buzzer from Jaquez to make it 47-19 at halftime.

The Bruins started the second half 5 for 6 from the floor, including two 3-pointers from Bernard and Juzang. The margin grew to 32 points (60-28) with more than 15 minutes left.

UCLA held Bakersfield to just 38% shooting overall, and shot 50% from the field itself, including 13 for 27 shooting from behind the arc.

The Bruins showed off their depth. Ten players logged more than 15 minutes, including promising sophomore Jaylen Clark, who has been battling an illness for a couple of weeks. Clark had 10 points, seven rebounds and three assists, and, of course, an extraordinary defensive effort.

“The guy is unbelievable,” Cronin said of Clark. “There will be times this year where Jaylen will play point guard then defend the center.”

Justin McCall scored 11 points and Shaun Williams added 10 for the Roadrunners.

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Whicker: Canelo Alvarez leaves no questions hanging after his knockout of Caleb Plant

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, poses with the belts after defeating Caleb Plant in a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, celebrates after defeating Caleb Plant by in a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, knocks down Caleb Plant to win a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Caleb Plant hits Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Caleb Plant hits Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Referee Russell Mora separates Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, left, and Caleb Plant during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, celebrates after defeating Caleb Plant by TKO in a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, knocks down Caleb Plant to win a super middleweight title unification fight by TKO, Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, hits Caleb Plant during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, celebrates after defeating Caleb Plant in a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, celebrates after defeating Caleb Plant in a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, left, fights Caleb Plant during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Caleb Plant sits in his corner between rounds against Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Caleb Plant, right, fights Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, right, fights Caleb Plant during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, right, fights Caleb Plant during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Caleb Plant sits in his corner between rounds against Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, right, fights Caleb Plant during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, against Caleb Plant during a super middleweight title unification fight Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, before a super middleweight title unification fight against Caleb Plant, Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, before a super middleweight title unification fight against Caleb Plant, Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

  • Fher Olvera of the band Mana after a super middleweight title unification fight between Canelo Alvarez, of Mexico, and Caleb Plant, Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Steve Marcus)

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LAS VEGAS — He knows boxing history, he yearns to add to its traditions, and yet Canelo Alvarez has no time for the one thing that has defined nearly every great fighter before him.

He’s not into rematches.

It isn’t as much of a personal preference as it is a necessary corollary.  A rematch requires doubt. It cleans up something unresolved. Canelo had to fight Gennady Golovkin twice to square account, at least to his satisfaction after their initial draw, and he was stubbornly reluctant to do that. Since then he has plowed through everyone else and left no doubt. Pete Carroll, circa 2005, would be proud of him.

On Saturday night Canelo lured a screeching throng of 16,586 to MGM Grand Garden Arena to watch him leave exclamation points instead of question marks. He knocked out Caleb Plant in the 11th round, and Plant observed the usual post-fight ritual for Alvarez’s opponents and paid a precautionary visit to the hospital. It gave Canelo a fourth belt in the super-middleweight division and, in case anybody was wondering who the modern-day King of Pop-Pop-Pop is, he wore a crown in the ring afterward.

A Canelo-Plant rematch would excite nobody. Same with Canelo-Billy Joe Saunders or Canelo-Callum Smith. He even ventured into the light-heavyweight division to destroy what was left of Sergey Kovalev, and nobody wants to see that either.

And yet Saturday night was compelling, if inevitable. Canelo has a knack for constructing a 12-round plan that holds up in the face of any difficulty. He isn’t afraid to lose an early round or two if he finds something that will sustain him late. In this case he didn’t always look comfortable against Plant’s jabs and movement, but he kept turning up the volume, judiciously, as the fight went on.

Plant did a nice job absorbing the big shots. It wasn’t a long-term solution.

Once Canelo has poked a hole in your boat, you’re joining the fishes in short order. Perhaps the last man who closed the show with such emphasis was Mike Tyson, who was sitting at ringside.

The first knockdown came after a left hook that crushed Plant’s right ear, followed by an uppercut that came from the general vicinity of hell. Plant went down and, in a testament to his healthy competitiveness and unhealthy judgment, decided to get up. If he was looking to return to Square One, Canelo circled it. He basically punched Plant all over the ring and finished him with three consecutive right hands, which sent down Plant and forced referee Russell Mora to bring out the hook.

Canelo landed 40 percent of his power shots, put nearly half of them on Plant’s body, and was defensively skilled enough to make Plant miss all but 22 percent of his jabs. The three judges had Canelo leading by six, four and two rounds when it ended, and the truth was probably in the middle of all that.

But Plant, despite his relative inexperience and his lack of a right hand, deserves more main events, and certainly is skillful enough to regain his IBF 168-pound belt whenever Canelo moves up or down.

“He was a difficult opponent for me,” Alvarez said. “He has a lot of ability and I respect him. We are both men at the end of the day. He was making it difficult but I followed the game plan that Eddy (trainer Reynoso) put out. I admit I was getting frustrated in the fifth round or so, but the second part of the fight was going to be different. And that’s all that matters, really.”

Plant and Canelo pushed the hype rituals to the breaking point, especially when Plant insulted Canelo’s mother, and the two went to fist city at a Beverly Hills press conference.

Afterward, they talked for a long time inside the ring and hugged warmly.

“He said he really wanted to get up and keep fighting, and I respect that,” Canelo said. “And he also apologized for the things that I said, and I said it was water under the bridge. I wish him well. He’s a great fighter.”

Who’s next? The next obvious fish in the barrel is David Benavidez, 24, who takes a 24-0 record with 21 knockouts into Saturday’s fight with Kyrone Davis in Phoenix. Benavidez is athletic and dangerous, and easily the most deserving super-middleweight to get an audience with The King. It might happen next May.

If so, Benavidez is advised to savor each moment of the all-inclusive package, even that mandatory stop at the hospital.

There is no follow-up visit.

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High school football: All of the scores from Friday’s Week 10 games

All of the CIF-SS and L.A. City high school football scores from Friday’s Week 10 games.

FRIDAY RESULTS

CIF-SS

605 LEAGUE

Cerritos 26, Artesia 13

Glenn 31, Pioneer 26

ALMONT LEAGUE

Schurr 39, San Gabriel 0

AMBASSADOR LEAGUE

Aquinas 36, Ontario Christian 7

Linfield Christian 26, Arrowhead Christian 6

ANGELUS LEAGUE

St. Francis 44, Crespi 32

St. Paul 36, Loyola 35

BASELINE LEAGUE

Etiwanda 21. Upland 13

Rancho Cucamonga 45, Damien 44 (OT)

BAY LEAGUE

Culver City 27, Santa Monica 0

Palos Verdes 34, Peninsula 0

Mira Costa 55, Redondo 34

BIG 4 LEAGUE

Segerstrom 24, Garden Grove 13

CAMINO LEAGUE

Bishop Diego 38, Camarillo 7

Newbury Park 37, Moorpark 22

CAMINO REAL LEAGUE

St. Genevieve 42, Cantwell-Sacred Heart 15

St. Pius X-St. Matthias 54, Bishop Montgomery 3

CANYON LEAGUE

Simi Valley 48, Agoura 12

Thousand Oaks 34, Oak Park 14

CHANNEL LEAGUE

Lompoc 62, Dos Pueblos 7

Oxnard Pacifica 31, Oxnard 7

Rio Mesa 17, Santa Barbara 14

CITRUS 4 LEAGUE

Glendora 38, South Hills 0

CITRUS BELT LEAGUE

Citrus Valley 52, Beaumont 29

Yucaipa 42, Redlands East Valley 14

CITRUS COAST LEAGUE

Hueneme 34, Nordhoff 8

Santa Paula 40, Carpinteria 6

CRESTVIEW LEAGUE

Foothill 31, El Modena 23

Yorba Linda 28, Villa Park 27

CROSS VALLEY LEAGUE

Big Bear 51, Silver Valley 13

DEL REY LEAGUE

St. Anthony 53, Harvard-Westlake 23

DEL RIO LEAGUE

La Serna 29, Whittier 13

DESERT EMPIRE LEAGUE

Xavier Prep 24, Palm Springs 19

DESERT SKY LEAGUE

Silverado 41, Barstow 0

DESERT VALLEY LEAGUE

Banning 34, Desert Mirage 0

Cathedral City 43, Desert Hot Springs 23

Coachella Valley 41, Indio 6

Twentynine Palms 37, Yucca Valley 10

FOOTHILL LEAGUE

Golden Valley 42, Canyon Country Canyon 0

West Ranch 21, Hart 16

FREEWAY LEAGUE

La Habra 28, Troy 19

Sonora 55, Buena Park 20

Sunny Hills 21, Fullerton 20

GARDEN GROVE LEAGUE

Loara 21, La Quinta 10

GOLD COAST LEAGUE

Campbell Hall 61, Brentwood 21

Sierra Canyon 61, Paraclete 0

GOLDEN LEAGUE

Highland 44, Knight 0

Palmdale 63, Quartz Hill 20

HACIENDA LEAGUE

Walnut 27, Diamond Bar 17

INLAND VALLEY LEAGUE

Riverside Poly 22, Lakeside 14

Vista del Lago 21, Moreno Valley 0

IVY LEAGUE

Elsinore 44, Temescal Canyon 34

Heritage 48, Riverside Notre Dame 7

MARMONTE LEAGUE

St. Bonaventure 34, Oaks Christian 13

Westlake 39, Calabasas 12

MIRAMONTE LEAGUE

Bassett 50, La Puente 14

Garey 70, Ganesha 20

MISSION LEAGUE

Alemany 49, Chaminade 21

Bishop Amat 41, Serra 40 (OT)

Notre Dame 31, Cathedral 15

MISSION VALLEY LEAGUE

Arroyo 50, Mountain View 0

El Monte 40, Gabrielino 35

Rosemead 42, South El Monte 20

MOJAVE RIVER LEAGUE

Apple Valley 62, Ridgecrest Burroughs 14

Serrano 30, Hesperia 6

MONTVIEW LEAGUE

Azusa 48, Sierra Vista 6

MOORE LEAGUE

Compton 52, Long Beach Cabrillo 0

Long Beach Poly 56, Lakewood 0

Millikan 35, Long Beach Wilson 12

MOUNTAIN PASS LEAGUE

San Jacinto 35, Citrus Hill 21

Tahquitz 48, Perris 33

MOUNTAIN VALLEY LEAGUE

Miller 43, Indian Springs 22

MOUNTAIN WEST LEAGUE

Bonita 34, Alta Loma 2

Ayala 40, Charter Oak 14

MT. BALDY 4 LEAGUE

Montclair 28, Hacienda Heights Wilson 20

NORTH HILLS LEAGUE

Canyon 55, Esperanza 24

Brea Olinda 28, El Dorado 20

OCEAN LEAGUE

Inglewood 106, Morningside 0

OLYMPIC LEAGUE

Village Christian 53, Heritage Christian 33

ORANGE LEAGUE

Anaheim 41, Century 7

Savanna 35, Santa Ana Valley 28

Western 48, Magnolia 0

ORANGE COAST LEAGUE

Costa Mesa 14, Estancia 7

PAC 4 LEAGUE

Laguna Beach 49, Godinez 0

Westminster 12, Ocean View 0

PACIFIC LEAGUE

Burroughs 30, Burbank 20

PACIFIC HILLS LEAGUE

Dana Hills 35, Portola 28

Irvine 35, Laguna Hills 0

PACIFIC VALLEY LEAGUE

Woodbridge 30, University 7

PACIFIC VIEW LEAGUE

Buena 38, Cabrillo 0

Santa Ynez 42, San Marcos 6

Ventura 42, Channel Islands 14

PIONEER LEAGUE

Lawndale 55, El Segundo 7

North Torrance 34, West Torrance 21

South Torrance 24, Torrance 14

RIO HONDO LEAGUE

La Canada 46, San Marino 43

Pasadena Poly 35, Temple City 7

RIVER VALLEY LEAGUE

Patriot 17, Arlington 14

Ramona 52, Hillcrest 30

SAN ANDREAS LEAGUE

Grand Terrace 58, Colton 28

Summit 13, Eisenhower 9

SAN ANTONIO LEAGUE

Claremont 37, Chaffey 0

West Covina 42, Don Lugo 0

SAN GABRIEL VALLEY LEAGUE

Dominguez 52, Lynwood 6

Warren 26, Downey 16

SANTA FE LEAGUE

Bosco Tech 6, Verbum Dei 0 (OT)

SEA VIEW LEAGUE

Capistrano Valley 28, Aliso Niguel 25

Trabuco Hills 34, El Toro 21

SIERRA LEAGUE

Covina 46, Pomona 7

SKYLINE LEAGUE

Bloomington 16, Arroyo Valley 7

Rialto 46, Fontana 20

SOUTH COAST LEAGUE

Mission Viejo 45, San Clemente 0

San Juan Hills 35, Tesoro 6

SUBURBAN LEAGUE

Mayfair 47, Bellflower 22

SUNBELT LEAGUE

Orange Vista 41, Hemet 6

Paloma Valley 60, Valley View 21

SUNKIST LEAGUE

Kaiser 48, Carter 12

SUNSET LEAGUE

Corona del Mar 49, Fountain Valley 7

Edison 41, Huntington Beach 6

Los Alamitos 48, Newport Harbor 6

TRINITY LEAGUE

Mater Dei 56, JSerra 14

Santa Margarita 35, Orange Lutheran 28

St. John Bosco 24, Servite 10

VALLE VISTA LEAGUE

Los Altos 29, Northview 28

San Dimas 17, Diamond Ranch 10

NONLEAGUE

Capistrano Valley Christian 41. Whittier Christian 6

Cerritos Valley Christian 34, Gahr 14

Fillmore 46, Mary Star 14

Glendale 39, Hoover 8

Rim of the World 42, Granite Hills 36

West Valley 22, Canyon Springs 14

L.A. CITY

CENTRAL LEAGUE

Maywood CES 34, Marquez 33

Mendez 40, Bernstein 25

COLISEUM LEAGUE

Dorsey 27, Crenshaw 6

Fremont 36, Hawkins 28

View Park 34, Locke 26

EAST VALLEY LEAGUE

Arleta 50, Chavez 0

Sun Valley Poly 21, Grant 18

Verdugo Hills 52, North Hollywood 8

EASTERN LEAGUE

L.A. Roosevelt 22, Garfield 19

South Gate 21, Huntington Park 20

EXPOSITION LEAGUE

Angelou 29, Rivera 12

Jefferson 42, Santee 14

MARINE LEAGUE

San Pedro 49, Narbonne 0

METRO LEAGUE

Dymally 52, Belmont 8

New Designs Watts 34, Washington 28

NORTHERN LEAGUE

Lincoln 51, Torres 6

Franklin 47, L.A. Wilson 10

SOUTHERN LEAGUE

Contreras 32, West Adams 0

Roybal 38, Hollywood 6

VALLEY MISSION LEAGUE

Kennedy 44, Panorama 18

Reseda 22, Canoga Park 12

WEST VALLEY LEAGUE

Birmingham 51, El Camino Real 7

Cleveland 22, Chatsworth 6

Granada Hills 30, Taft 14

WESTERN LEAGUE

Fairfax 26, L.A. Hamilton 21

Palisades 41, Westchester 14

8 MAN

CIF-SS

AGAPE LEAGUE

Academy of Careers & Exploration 36, PAL Academy 22

Hesperia Christian 60, Lucerne Valley 0

MAJESTIC LEAGUE

Cornerstone Christian 36, California Lutheran 20

PREP LEAGUE

Chadwick 37, Flintridge Prep 31

NONLEAGUE

Rolling Hills Prep 56, Laguna Blanca 30

L.A. CITY

VALLEY LEAGUE

Fulton 70. East Valley 12

NONLEAGUE

Sotomayor 44, University Pathways 12

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Disneyland raises ticket prices for most types of admission

Disneyland has raised prices on most single and multi-day tickets after admission costs remained unchanged during the initial six-month phased reopening from an extended COVID-19 closure of the Anaheim theme park.

Ticket prices for Disneyland and Disney California Adventure increased an average of 6% on Monday, Oct. 25 with some single-park, parkhopper and multi-day tickets climbing more than 8%. The lowest-priced one-day single park ticket remained unchanged from 2019 at $104.

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A sixth tier was added to Disneyland’s former five-tier pricing system — raising the top price for a single-day, single park ticket from $154 to $164 and the most expensive parkhopper ticket from $209 to $224.

Single-day, single park ticket prices increased 0% to 8.1%: Tier 1 ($104), Tier 2 ($119), Tier 3 ($134), Tier 4 ($149), Tier 5 ($159) and Tier 6 ($164).

Parkhopper tickets rose 3.1% to 8.4%: Tier 1 ($164), Tier 2 ($179), Tier 3 ($194), Tier 4 ($209), Tier 5 ($219) and Tier 6 ($224). Parkhopper tickets provide admission to both Disneyland and Disney California Adventure on the same day.

READ MORE: Top-priced Dream Key annual pass sells out

Multi-day tickets saw similar spikes. Two-day, one-park tickets rose to $255 (from $235) while two-day parkhoppers climbed to $315 (from $290). Three-day tickets now cost $330 for single park per day access and $390 for the parkhopper.

The daily theme park parking rates also rose from $25 to $30. Self parking at the Disneyland resort’s three hotels also climbed from $25 to $40. Hotel valet parking jumped from $35 to $50.

Disneyland did not raise ticket prices when the Anaheim theme parks reopened April 30 after a 412-day coronavirus closure. Disneyland last raised ticket and annual pass prices in February 2020.

Since 2000, the price of admission to Disneyland has nearly quadrupled from $43 to $164, the new single-day ticket price on the park’s busiest days.

READ MORE: Disneyland parking trams to return in early 2022

With the latest increases, Disneyland continues to use ticket pricing to manage attendance and spread visits from peak periods to slower times of the year.

Starting in 2016, Disneyland switched to a demand-based pricing system with tickets divided into “value,” “regular” and “peak” days. Disneyland moved from a three-tier to a five-tier pricing system in 2020. The new Tier 1-6 system moves Disney closer to a dynamic pricing model designed to spread visitors throughout the year — away from busier days during the peak season to slower days in the off season. The Disney parks will employ the Tier 1 pricing on the slowest days of the year and Tier 6 pricing on the busiest days.

The first Tier 6 pricing days are not expected to appear on the Disneyland and DCA calendars until March 2022.

Disney ticket price increases typically have a ripple effect, with theme parks like Universal Studios, SeaWorld and Knott’s Berry Farm raising admissions soon after to keep pace with the industry leader.

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