Sources: White House aware of Russian bounties in 2019

By JAMES LaPORTA

Top officials in the White House were aware in early 2019 of classified intelligence indicating Russia was secretly offering bounties to the Taliban for the deaths of Americans, a full year earlier than has been previously reported, according to U.S. officials with direct knowledge of the intelligence.

The assessment was included in at least one of President Donald Trump’s written daily intelligence briefings at the time, according to the officials. Then-national security adviser John Bolton also told colleagues at the time that he briefed Trump on the intelligence assessment in March 2019.

The White House didn’t respond to questions about Trump or other officials’ awareness of Russia’s provocations in 2019. The White House has said Trump wasn’t — and still hasn’t been — briefed on the intelligence assessments because they haven’t been fully verified. However, it’s rare for intelligence to be confirmed without a shadow of a doubt before it is presented to top officials.

Bolton declined to comment Monday when asked by the AP if he’d briefed Trump about the matter in 2019. On Sunday, he suggested to NBC that Trump was claiming ignorance of Russia’s provocations to justify his administration’s lack of response.

“He can disown everything if nobody ever told him about it,” Bolton said.

The revelations cast new doubt on the White House’s efforts to distance Trump from the Russian intelligence assessments. The AP reported Sunday that concerns about Russian bounties also were in a second written presidential daily briefing this year and that current national security adviser Robert O’Brien had discussed the matter with Trump. O’Brien denies doing that.

On Monday, O’Brien said that while the intelligence assessments regarding Russian bounties “have not been verified,” the administration has “been preparing should the situation warrant action.”

The administration’s earlier awareness of the Russian efforts raises additional questions about why Trump didn’t take punitive action against Moscow for efforts that put the lives of American service members at risk. Trump has sought throughout his time in office to improve relations with Russia and President Vladimir Putin, moving this year to try to reinstate Russia as part of a group of world leaders it had been kicked out of.

Officials said they didn’t consider the intelligence assessments in 2019 to be particularly urgent, given Russian meddling in Afghanistan isn’t a new occurrence. The officials with knowledge of Bolton’s apparent briefing for Trump said it contained no “actionable intelligence,” meaning the intelligence community didn’t have enough information to form a strategic plan or response. However, the classified assessment of Russian bounties was the sole purpose of the meeting.

The officials insisted on anonymity because they weren’t authorized to disclose the highly sensitive information.

The intelligence that surfaced in early 2019 indicated Russian operatives had become more aggressive in their desire to contract with the Taliban and members of the Haqqani Network, a militant group aligned with the Taliban in Afghanistan and designated a foreign terrorist organization in 2012 during the Obama administration.

The National Security Council and the undersecretary of defense for intelligence held meetings regarding the intelligence. The NSC didn’t respond to questions about the meetings.

Late Monday, the Pentagon issued a statement saying it was evaluating the intelligence but so far had “no corroborating evidence to validate the recent allegations.”

“Regardless, we always take the safety and security of our forces in Afghanistan — and around the world — most seriously and therefore continuously adopt measures to prevent harm from potential threats,” said Pentagon spokesman Jonathan Hoffman.

Concerns about Russian bounties flared anew this year after members of the elite Naval Special Warfare Development Group, known to the public as SEAL Team Six, raided a Taliban outpost and recovered roughly $500,000 in U.S. currency. The funds bolstered the suspicions of the American intelligence community that Russians had offered money to Taliban militants and linked associations.

The White House contends the president was unaware of this development, too.

The officials told the AP that career government officials developed potential options for the White House to respond to the Russian aggression in Afghanistan, which was first reported by The New York Times. However, the Trump administration has yet to authorize any action.

The intelligence in 2019 and 2020 surrounding Russian bounties was derived in part from debriefings of captured Taliban militants. Officials with knowledge of the matter told the AP that Taliban operatives from opposite ends of the country and from separate tribes offered similar accounts.

Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov denied Russian intelligence officers had offered payments to the Taliban in exchange for targeting U.S. and coalition forces.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called the Taliban’s chief negotiator, a spokesman for the insurgents said Tuesday, but it was unknown whether there was any mention during their conversation of allegations about Russian bounties. Pompeo pressed the insurgents to reduce violence in Afghanistan and discussed ways of advancing a U.S.-Taliban peace deal signed in February, the Taliban spokesman tweeted.

The U.S. is investigating whether Americans died because of the Russian bounties. Officials are focused on an April 2019 attack on an American convoy. Three U.S. Marines were killed after a car rigged with explosives detonated near their armored vehicles as they returned to Bagram Airfield, the largest U.S. military installation in Afghanistan.

The Defense Department identified them as Marine Staff Sgt. Christopher Slutman, 43, of Newark, Delaware; Sgt. Benjamin Hines, 31, of York, Pennsylvania; and Cpl. Robert Hendriks, 25, of Locust Valley, New York. They were infantrymen assigned to 2nd Battalion, 25th Marines, a reserve infantry unit headquartered out of Garden City, New York.

Hendriks’ father told the AP that even a rumor of Russian bounties should have been immediately addressed.

“If this was kind of swept under the carpet as to not make it a bigger issue with Russia, and one ounce of blood was spilled when they knew this, I lost all respect for this administration and everything,” Erik Hendriks said.

Three other service members and an Afghan contractor were wounded in the attack. As of April 2019, the attack was under a separate investigation, unrelated to the Russian bounties.

The officials who spoke to the AP also said they were looking closely at insider attacks from 2019 to determine if they were linked to Russian bounties.

Associated Press writers Zeke Miller and Deb Riechmann in Washington, Deepti Hajela in New York and Vladimir Isachenkov in Moscow contributed to this report.

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California’s alleged Golden State Killer set to plead guilty

By DON THOMPSON

SACRAMENTO — Forty years after a sadistic suburban rapist terrorized California in what investigators later realized were a series of linked assaults and slayings, a 74-year-old former police officer is expected to plead guilty Monday to being the elusive Golden State Killer.

The deal will spare Joseph James DeAngelo Jr. any chance of the death penalty for 13 murders and 13 kidnapping-related charges spanning six counties. In partial return, survivors of the assaults that spanned the 1970s and 1980s expect him to admit to up to 62 rapes that he could not be criminally charged with because too much time has passed.

Yet nothing is certain until he actually speaks in a Sacramento State University ballroom pressed into use as a courtroom to provide for social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic.

“I’ve been on pins and needles because I just don’t like that our lives are tied to him, again,” said Jennifer Carole, the daughter of Lyman Smith, a lawyer who was slain in 1980 at age 43 in Ventura County. His wife, 33-year-old Charlene Smith, was also raped and killed.

Investigators early on connected certain crimes to an armed and masked rapist who would break into sleeping couples’ suburban homes at night, binding the man and piling dishes on his back. He would threaten to kill both victims if he heard the plates fall while he raped the woman.

Gay and Bob Hardwick were among the survivors.

They are now looking forward to DeAngelo admitting to that 1978 assault. The death penalty was never realistic anyway, she said, given DeAngelo’s age and Gov. Gavin Newsom’s moratorium on executions.

“He certainly does deserve to die, in my view, so I am seeing that he is trading the death penalty for death in prison,” she said. “It will be good to put the thing to rest. I think he will never serve the sentence that we have served — we’ve served the sentence for 42 years.”

A guilty plea and life sentence avoids a trial or even the planned weeks-long preliminary hearing. The victims expect to confront him at his sentencing in August, where it’s expected to take several days to tell DeAngelo and Sacramento County Superior Court Judge Michael Bowman what they have suffered.


Newlyweds Keith and Patty Harrington were killed in August 1980. They are believed to be among the victims of the Golden State Killer. (Courtesy of the Harrington family)

Ron Harrington’s younger brother, Keith, was married to Patty Harrington for just three months when they were bludgeoned to death in their Orange County home in 1980 by a killer then known as the Original Night Stalker.

All four brothers were successful, but “Keith, the youngest of all of us, was the smartest,” he said. “It’s just such a loss. And every time this comes up I think of all the lives he would have saved as an emergency room doctor.”

Their father found the couple two days later.

“It was so gruesome,” Harrington said. ”My dad was never the same.”


Manuela Witthuhn, 28 was bound, raped and bludgeoned to death in 1981 in the bedroom of a single-story house in Irvine. She was alone. Her husband, David, was hospitalized at the time. DNA evidence led authorities to link the crime to the East Area Rapist, now known as the Golden State Killer. (File photo)

 


Janelle Cruz, killed in 1986, is believed to have been a victim of the Golden State Killer. (File photo)

 

The killer racked up a series of monikers for his crimes over the decades.

Visalia Ransacker.

East Area Rapist.

Original Night Stalker.

Diamond Knot Killer.

But it wasn’t until years later that investigators connected a series of assaults in central and Northern California to later slayings in Southern California and settled on the umbrella Golden State Killer nickname for the mysterious assailant whose crimes spanned 11 counties from 1974 through mid-1986.

The mystery sparked worldwide interest, a best-selling book and a six-part HBO documentary, “I’ll Be Gone in the Dark,” that premiered Sunday.

It was only the pioneering use of new DNA techniques that two years ago led investigators to DeAngelo, who was fired from the Auburn Police Department northeast of Sacramento in 1979 after he was caught shoplifting dog repellent and a hammer. He previously had worked as a police officer in the Central Valley town of Exeter from 1973 to 1976, near where the Visalia Ransacker struck more than 100 homes south of Fresno.

Investigators painstakingly built a family tree by linking decades-old crime scene DNA to a distant relative through a popular online DNA database. They eventually narrowed in on DeAngelo with a process that has since been used in other cases nationwide, but said they confirmed the link only after surreptitiously collecting his DNA from his car door and a discarded tissue.

His defense attorneys have publicly lobbied since then for a deal that would spare him the death penalty, though they did not respond to repeated requests for comment before Monday’s hearing.

Prosecutors who had sought the death penalty cited the massively complicated case and the advancing age of many of the victims and witnesses in agreeing to consider the plea bargain.

“Death doesn’t solve anything. But him having to sit though a trial or preliminary hearing, that would have helped,” said Carole, who said neither she nor her slain father believed in capital punishment.

She was so committed to seeing the case through that she temporarily moved from Santa Cruz to her adult daughter’s Sacramento home, where she has slept on an air mattress in a spare bedroom. She has told the story of her father’s death and her own recent experiences through podcasts called The Lawyer’s Daughter.

But she said it “absolutely” makes sense for prosecutors to agree to a life sentence without parole, both to spare older victims and witnesses who are most vulnerable to the coronavirus from having to appear in court, and to save taxpayers the $20 million projected cost of a trial.

Harrington supports the death penalty, but also agreed with prosecutors’ decision “just to give some degree of closure.”

“This will be a relief for all of us, to move on with our lives,” said Hardwick. “We’ve dealt with the effects of the attack for 42 years.”

***

These are the charges faced by DeAngelo. The charges linked to rapes were filed as kidnappings to commit robberies because the statute of limitations for sexual assaults has expired.

Contra Costa County:Four counts of kidnapping to commit robbery using a gun and knife between Oct. 7, 1978, and June 11, 1979, with the victims identified as Jane Does numbers 10-13.

Orange County:Four counts of murder in the Aug. 21, 1980, slaying of Keith Harrington, 24, and rape and slaying of Patrice Harrington, 27, of Dana Point; the Feb. 6, 1981, rape and slaying of Manuela Witthuhn, 28, of Irvine; and the May 5, 1986, rape and slaying of Janelle Cruz, 18, of Irvine.

Sacramento County:Two counts of murder in the Feb. 2, 1978, shootings of Kate Maggoire, 20, and Brian Maggoire, 21, as they walked their dog in their Rancho Cordova neighborhood.

Nine counts of kidnapping to commit robbery using a gun and knife between Sept. 4, 1976, and Oct. 21, 1977, with the victims identified as Jane Does numbers 1-9.

Santa Barbara County:Four counts of murder in the Dec. 30, 1979, rape and slaying of Debra Manning, 35, and slaying of Robert Offerman, 44, of Goleta, and in the July 27, 1981, slaying of Gregory Sanchez, 27, and Cheri Domingo, 35, of Goleta.

Tulare County:One count of murder in the Sept. 11, 1975, slaying of Claude Snelling, 45, during an attempted kidnapping of the victim’s daughter from their home.

Ventura County:Two counts of murder in the rape and slaying of Charlene Smith, 33, and slaying of Lyman Smith, 43, of Ventura between March 13 and March 16, 1980.

Source for charges: Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office.

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Southern California pending home sales rise 8th straight week, just 2% below 2019

Southern California house hunters put 5% more homes into escrow in the most recent week — the eighth consecutive weekly increase — as the buying pace runs 2% below a year ago.

My trusty spreadsheet’s compilation of Zillow’s weekly report on activity from brokers’ listing services in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties shows the local housing market rebounding from economic turmoil created by stay at home orders designed to slow a pandemic’s spread.

With 3,605 existing homes put into escrow in the week ended June 13, pending sales are up 172 in a week but down 78 in a year.

Options for house hunters remain slim. Southern California owners listed 4,452 homes for sale in the week — down 8.3% vs. the previous week and down 15.1% in a year. That put total inventory at 28,778 — up 0.2% vs. the previous week but down 26% in a year.

Fewer restrictions on businesses, including home sales, plus low mortgage rates are putting owners and house hunters in a selling mood. But even after a significant run-up of late, some slices of the market still trail year-ago levels.


STAFF GRAPHIC

How the data breaks down in Los Angeles and Orange counties …

New escrows: 1,974 contracts signed — up 7.6% in a week; up 34% in a month; down 10.9% over 12 months.

New listings: 2,793 over seven days — down 3.5% vs. the previous week; up 13.9% in a month; down 12.5% in a year.

Total inventory: 17,156 homes on the market — up 1.659% in a week; up 10.4% in a month; down 25.7% over 12 months.

Median list price: $890,800 — up 0.9% vs. the previous week; up 3.6% in a month; up 6.5% in a year.

In the Inland Empire …

New escrows: 1,631 — up 2.1% in a week; up 35% in a month; up 11.1% over 12 months.

New listings: 1,659 — down 15.3% vs. the previous week; up 7.4% in a month; down 19.1% in a year.

Total inventory: 11,622 — down 1.9% in a week; down 3.5% in a month; down 27% over 12 months.

Median list price: $435,826 — up 0.8% vs. the previous week; up 2.2% in a month; up 3.1% in a year.

Attention, real estate watchers: Sign up for The Home Stretch newsletter. It’s a free, three-times-a-week review of what’s important for housing around the region. Subscribe here!

Statewide …

New escrows: 8,112 — up 4.5% in a week; up 36% in a month; up 6.9% over 12 months.

New listings: 10,335 — down 11% vs. the previous week; up 11.3% in a month; down 20% in a year.

Total inventory: 51,293 — down 1.6% in a week; down 5.5% in a month; down 33% over 12 months.


STAFF GRAPHIC

Median list price: $661,241 — up 1.8% vs. the previous week; up 8.4% in a month; up 10.3% in a year.

Nationally …

New escrows: 85,778 — up 2.8% in a week; up 17.7% in a month; up 13.6% over 12 months.

New listings: 132,790 — down 3.8% vs. the previous week; up 13.9% in a month; down 16.6% in a year.

Total inventory: 1,120,998 — down 0.4% in a week; up 0.1% in a month; down 17.1% over 12 months.

Median list price: $332,680 — up 0.8% vs. the previous week; up 3% in a month; up 2.5% in a year.

Remember, pending sales must get through the escrow process. May’s data on closed sales from DQ News shows Southern California homebuyers bought about half as many homes in May as they did a year ago.

A total of 12,271 new and existing homes changed hands in the six-county region last month, the lowest number for a May and the third-lowest for any month in DQ News’ 32 years of tracking the market.

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Coronavirus: Here are some case trends in the U.S., California and its counties

Experts are looking at trends and averages to know when it’s safe to open up the nation, state and counties. There are some good trends and some not so good trends to consider.

California and U.S.

Data from Johns Hopkins University’s Coronavirus Resource Center shows that California’s three-day moving average of new cases is steadily increasing. You can follow the trends of every state and country on the Coronavirus Resource Center website.

California’s test positivity rate for a 14-day period ending Friday was 4.4% (out of 53,473 tests). You can find the daily trend for the state and county here at the California Department of Public Health’s dashboard.

Here’s a list of criteria the state has for reopening. You can see how all the counties are doing at this link to the California Department of Health’s data table.

Trends by county

Here’s a look at some of the hardest-hit counties, how they are measuring up to the state’s reopening criteria and each one’s seven-day case rates.

You can follow Southern California county totals at this SCNG website.

Maps show daily count of coronavirus cases, deaths in Southern California by county

You can follow Bay Area county totals at this BANG website.

The national picture:

Sources: County health departments, John’s Hopkins University, COVID-19 Tracking Project, California Department of Health, Our World in Data

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O.C., Inland law enforcement agencies join departments suspending use of sleeper holds

The Placentia, Corona and Riverside Police departments, along with the Orange and San Bernardino County sheriff’s departments, announced moratoriums on the use of carotid restraint control holds effective Tuesday, June 9, echoing similar policy shifts made by other Southern California agencies following the death of George Floyd.

The Orange, San Bernardino County and Riverside County-area agencies are some of the latest to prohibit the use of the technique, also called a sleeper hold, after Floyd died in Minneapolis police custody, resulting in widespread criticism of the use of force by law enforcement.

The Santa Ana, Glendale, Pasadena and El Monte Police departments made similar statements on Sunday and Monday.

As of Monday, Anaheim police officers will be authorized to use carotid holds only in situations where lethal force is deemed necessary, Anaheim Police Department Sgt. Shane Carringer said.

In addition, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday voted to support a statewide ban on carotid artery restraints.  The county’s District Attorney, Jackie Lacey, also announced that her investigators would be prohibited from using carotid holds.

Earlier, Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva declared Monday “an immediate moratorium on the use of the LASD carotid restraint in all situations which do not rise to the level of deadly force.” Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore and Police Commission President Eileen Decker also reached an agreement at the beginning of the week that prohibits the city’s police force from using the maneuver.

A long-term decision regarding the change at the Riverside Police Department is pending the result of AB 1196, legislation supported by Gov. Gavin Newsom that would prohibit police from using carotid holds, department spokesman Ryan Railsback said Tuesday. A statement issued Tuesday by the Corona Police Department references the governor’s decision to order the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) to cease instruction of the controversial technique as of Friday, June 5.

In compliance with that directive, the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department will no longer teach carotid control holds at the academy it operates in Devore, SBCSD spokeswoman Cindy Bachman said. The department has also suspended the technique’s deployment by its deputies, effective Tuesday.

“The Department is currently reviewing its uses of force policy,” Orange County Sheriff’s officials wrote in a statement issued Tuesday. “Effective immediately, the Department is suspending the use of the carotid control hold and evaluating its use and effectiveness as a compliance tool.”

“Effective immediately, (the) Placentia Police Department will suspend the use of the Carotid Restraint Control Hold as a use of force option until further evaluation and assessment,” officials at that department said.

Recent scrutiny of carotid restraint holds comes on the heels of mass demonstrations held nationwide in response to the death of Floyd. He was the unarmed black man who said “I can’t breathe” while former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee against the side of his neck for nearly nine minutes. Chauvin and the other three officers involved in Floyd’s detainment have been arrested.

The former officer did not use specifically use a carotid hold, which normally involves using one’s hands to apply pressure to the sides of the neck. The technique restricts arteries that supply oxygen to the brain and differs from a choke hold, which is defined as a maneuver that pinches the front of a person’s throat to inhibit breathing.

A nationwide ban on choke holds, which were linked to the death of Eric Garner in 2014, is among the measures suggested in the Justice in Policing Act authored by Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif. The proposed legislation was introduced by Democrats on Monday.

City News Service contributed to this report.

 

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Small earthquakes strike near Ridgecrest

RIDGECREST — Several small earthquakes struck Sunday night near the Kern County community of Ridgecrest, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

The largest one, a preliminary magnitude of 4.3, hit around 14 miles east of Ridgecrest about 9:15 p.m., the USGS reported.

An earlier quake measuring magnitude 3.0 struck just more than 31 miles northwest of the town, about 8:25 p.m.

No damage or injuries were reported.

Last week, the area was hit by a 5.5. magnitude temblor, which experts called an aftershock to the large quakes felt throughout Southern California in July 2019, including a 7.1 quake on July 5.

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ACLU sues Los Angeles, LA County and San Bernardino to stop curfews

LOS ANGELES — Calling the curfews imposed throughout Southern California “draconian,” the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit Wednesday on behalf of Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles and individual journalists, protesters and others against Los Angeles, Los Angeles County and the city of San Bernardino.

The ACLU claims in the lawsuit filed in federal court in Los Angeles that the curfews are a violation of the First Amendment because they suppress all political protest in the evening hours and restricting movement outside of working hours is a violation of the Constitution’s protection of freedom of movement.

“The city and county of Los Angeles are attempting to use these curfews to suppress Black Lives Matter-L.A.’s right to protest,” Melina Abdullah, a co-founder of BLM-L.A., said.

“They are attempting to suppress our ability to fully mobilize and focus full attention on the true issue of concern in the protests — police violence against black people.”

Enforcement of an L.A. curfew was seen Wednesday night in Grand Park, across the street from Los Angeles City Hall in downtown Los Angeles.

About 11:20 p.m., @LASDHQ deputies began arresting members of the group, several at a time, and walked them over into the theee Sheriff’s Department busses parked in front of City Hall. pic.twitter.com/O9730zGW9L

— Jonah Valdez (@Jonahmv) June 4, 2020

A small group of about 120 people had remained after a crowd of about 4,000 protesters gradually thinned out after the city’s 9 p.m. curfew had gone into effect.

The small group staged a sit-in at the park in protest of the curfew, arguing that they were only there to exercise their First Amendment rights and should not be subject to arrest.

By about 11:20 p.m., Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputies closed in on the sitting group at Grand Park, which is owned by the county.

The group chanted, “Peaceful protest” with hands raised, as the deputies arrested the group, several at a time.

The ACLU lawsuit claims the curfews also prohibit journalists from being able to fully report their stories from the scenes of the protests.

“These unconstitutional curfews have suppressed a huge amount of important political protest activity and disrupted the lives of over 10 million people,” Ahilan Arulanantham, senior counsel of the ACLU SoCal, said. “The curfews must end now.”

LA County Sheriff Alex Villanueva has said curfews in the county will remain in effect until the protests end.

 

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Norco ’80, finale: Careers ruined, police tactics changed by bank robbery and gun battle

Norco ’80
The true story of the most spectacular bank robbery in American history

On July 13, 1980, just over two months after the Norco bank robbery, the Riverside Press-Enterprise began a four-part exposé titled “Staying Alive.” Ostensibly an exploration of lessons learned from the Norco bank robbery, the opening lines of the first article clearly announced what it was really about:

Riverside sheriff’s deputies are angry. And they’re scared. A fellow officer, James B. Evans, was shot to death during a robbery and chase that led into the San Gabriel Mountains. The deputies don’t think their department is doing enough to prevent it from happening again.

Grumbling among the RSO deputies had begun immediately after Norco, many feeling they had inadequate training, weapons and communications. Most of the accusations were aimed directly at Sheriff Ben Clark, in his 17th year leading the department.

Clark contested the accusations head-on. “Riverside’s deputies are as well-trained and equipped as any police officers in the state.” On the subject of guns, Clark conceded, “The bad guys simply had the better weapons.” However, he dismissed the idea that high-powered rifles would have done his men any good.


Parker Esquivel, 10, of Riverside gets a lesson in sighting an M60 machine gun at the Neighborhood Leaders to National Heroes event at Riverside Municipal Airport. (Photo by Melissa Eiselein, THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE/SCNG)

Other police agencies involved thought differently. In the two months following the Norco bank robbery, the Riverside PD had ordered a dozen high-powered rifles. The San Bernardino Sheriff’s Office acquired three dozen automatic weapons and an M60 belt-fed machine gun capable of firing 750 rounds of .308 ammunition per minute to mount on one of its choppers.

Shortly after publication of the article, Sheriff Clark changed course with a surprising announcement. “It is our intention to buy 40 Mini-14 rifles.”

After 100 years of policing the Wild West with a six-shooter and a Winchester shotgun, Inland Empire law enforcement agencies were now on their way to becoming some of the most heavily armed in the nation. The two sheriff’s departments had gone from a pair of high-powered rifles between them to more than 75 and counting. Helicopters, unarmed before Norco, now circled overhead with machine guns at the ready.

After the flurry of weapons acquisitions was announced, deputies Andy Delgado and Dave Madden were watching television when the evening news showed video of German police clad in body armor holding Heckler & Koch MP5 submachine guns across their chests. “That’s the way it’s going,” Andy said. “That’s how we’ll all be armed soon.”

•••

Andy Delgado never fully forgave Glyn Bolasky and Chuck Hille for leaving him alone under fire in front of the bank that day. “I had a three-minute gun battle with the robbers. I wasn’t happy being left there to die,” he told the Press-Enterprise.


Riverside deputy Glyn Bolasky was shot by the robbers as he responded to the Security Pacific bank in Norco. (Photo by Riverside Press-Enterprise)

Plagued by bad dreams, dark thoughts and anxiety along with a growing bitterness toward the department, Glyn Bolasky quit the RSO within the year for a job at the Riverside PD. But soon into his six-month field-training program his training officer spotted problems. Bolasky was jittery, his behavior erratic. “I like the guy,” the training officer concluded, “but he just can’t get over Norco.”

On Jan. 12, 1981, the Riverside Police Department parted ways with Bolasky, labeling him a “vicarious liability.” When a reporter asked RPD Chief Victor Jones why his department had not done more to help Bolasky, “Jones said he doesn’t have the budget for psychologists or psychiatrists, so he retires officers when they have mental fatigue.” The comment was a stark illustration of law enforcement’s approach at the time to the problem of posttraumatic stress disorder among officers.


Riverside deputy Andy Delgado arrived at the scene of the robbery and immediately ended up in a gun battle with the bad guys. (Photo courtesy of Andy Monti)

Norco marked the start of a two-year slide for Andy Delgado. Well respected but always fiery, Delgado increasingly found himself in flare-ups, confrontations and shouting matches with supervisors and fellow officers. By the first anniversary of Norco, he was carrying two handguns while out in the field – one in a shoulder holster, one in his boot. He did not try to disguise the reason: “If I can’t count on people in this department to back me up, then I’ll do it myself.”  In February of 1982, Det. Andy Delgado was medically discharged by the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department for posttraumatic stress disorder.

It had taken 20 months, but now two of the three deputies who had shot it out with the escaping bank robbers at the intersection of Fourth and Hamner were out of the only career they had ever wanted. Within a few more years, the third, Chuck Hille would follow with a related medical discharge.

Twenty years after the Norco bank robbery, the Riverside Sheriff’s Department finally officially honored the deputies involved. In a 2000 commemoration ceremony, Glyn Bolasky, Chuck Hille, Andy Delgado and Rolf Parkes received the Medal of Courage for “acts of heroism performed at great risk to life and limb.” James Evans was posthumously awarded the RSO’s highest honor, the Medal of Valor.

•••

At 11 a.m. on Dec. 2, 2015, two Islamic extremists armed with AR-15 semiautomatic rifles, thousands of rounds of .223 ammunition and homemade pipe bombs burst into the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino and opened fire on an employee meeting inside. Within minutes, 14 were dead and 22 seriously injured. The suspects fled the scene, immediately sparking the largest manhunt in the Inland Empire since the search for the Norco bank robbers 35 years before.

But this time, Inland Empire law enforcement agencies came equipped with more than just a single beat-up M16. Officers swarmed the region in BearCat armored personnel carriers and armed with semiautomatic weapons while police choppers equipped as “gun platforms” circled overhead. Trapped in a suburban neighborhood four hours later, the two suspects were killed in just over five minutes with a hail of 440 rounds of police gunfire.

In the immediate aftermath, local police officials cited the lesson learned from Norco as the genesis of the Inland Empire law enforcement’s ability to rapidly deploy with such overwhelming force. In a 2017 article for Vice entitled “How a 1980 Bank Robbery Sparked the Militarization of America’s Police,” a quote from Rolf Parkes pinpointed the evolution to a specific moment and the actions of a single deputy: D. J. McCarty. “When the suspects heard that rifle, they realized their firepower was now being matched. There would have been a lot more dead cops on that road if not for that weapon.”

D. J. McCarty was awarded the Medal of Valor by the San Bernardino Sheriff’s Department for his actions on Baldy Notch Road.

•••

A man walks into the room with a sly, almost mischievous smile on his face. He is in his mid-60s with a potbelly, the long beard and hair much as it was 35 years earlier, only now snow white. The eyes are the same, too, squinty with a bit of a sparkle. If he auditioned for Santa Claus at the local mall, he’d probably get the job. But he can’t. This is the Inmate Visiting Center of Unit A at the California State Prison in Lancaster, high on the desert plain east of Los Angeles. Russell Harven has been here a long time, and he is never getting out.


Robber Chris Harven was shot and wounded by Riverside deputy Jim Evans just before Evans was killed by gunfire from the bad guys he’d been chasing. Harven is seen here after his capture on Mount Baldy. (Photo courtesy of San Bernardino Sun)

“My brother is giving me hell for this.” Russ is talking about his older brother, Chris, currently held up north in a Vacaville prison. The two had been cellmates for most of the last 15 years, and he expects to be transferred up to Vacaville soon where they will be again. Russ sees it as a blessing and a curse. On one hand, at least it’s someone he knows. On the other hand, it’s Chris. The dynamic has not changed all that much in 35 years.

The visitor center is full of men in denim shirts and pants, almost all black or Hispanic. If they think about an old white inmate like Russell Harven at all, it is probably dismissively. But there is not one of them in the room who has a conviction record approaching anything like his: 45 major felonies including kidnapping, explosives, armed robbery, 24 counts of attempted murder and two first-degree murder convictions in the deaths of Jim Evans and Billy Delgado.

Harven responds to the visitor’s questions as best he can, even if the answers are simple and uncomplicated. “I’ve spent most of my life trying not to think about what happened that day.” In his letters and as he speaks, the superior intelligence range in which he tested just after Norco is obvious. He refers to himself as having been “indolent” and “fatalistic” in the years leading up to Norco. He says it never occurred to him that it would end up in a gunfight. If it had, he never would have done it. When asked if he thinks he fired the shot that killed Jim Evans, he looks away. “God, I hope not.”

Like his brother, Russell is still angry about the trial. Tried along with Chris and George, all three defense teams accused the prosecution and police of misconduct including perjury and destroying evidence. They stand by their assertion during the trial that it was friendly fire from D.J. McCarty that killed Evans, so they should have gotten 25 years to life under the Felony Murder Rule instead of life without parole. “I am somewhat bitter about getting that sentence,” he says. “I used to be a happy-go-lucky, devil-may-care type. Now I am a bitter old man waiting for my toe tag.”

After two hours, the visitor runs out of questions, so they spend the last hour talking about ’70s rock music and L.A. radio stations they used to listen to, the smoggy days, sneaking into Disneyland – all the stuff teenagers growing up in Orange County did back then. For a while, they are just two guys sitting around talking about the old neighborhood. They try to figure out if they might have gone to some of the same concerts. “What about the AC/DC Back in Black tour at the Orange Pavilion in San Bernardino?” the visitor asks. Harven’s mood changes. Of course he wasn’t there. It was September 1980. By then, Russell Harven had already thrown his life away.

The guard calls out visitor hours are over and Harven stands. Before leaving, the visitor cannot help but ask what is both the best and stupidest question one can ask someone who has done something unimaginable: “Why did you do it?”

“Simple,” Harven says without hesitation. “Because I thought we’d get away with it.”

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Protests, looting continue in Southern California as new week begins

Protests for racial equality, woven between bouts of looting and vandalism by opportunists, continued Monday as Southern California residents started to pick up the pieces from a destructive weekend.

Monday marked the sixth day of nationwide unrest over the death of 46-year-old George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody. Floyd, who was accused of passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a corner convenience store, was killed when fired Officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for almost nine minutes.

Early in the day,.an autopsy carried out by independent experts hired by the man’s family declared Floyd died from “asphyxiation from sustained pressure” caused by the knee on his neck, putting the results at odds with that of the Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s Office, according to CNN.

Cities and counties across Southern California set curfews in some areas as early as 1 p.m. Monday as the National Guard and police departments attempted to avoid the looting and destruction experienced over the weekend.

Indeed, even before nightfall, some looters in Hollywood and Van Nuys were met with LAPD police officers and handcuffs. Police also arrested a man in Upland for allegedly brandishing a firearm during a demonstration, officials said.

President Donald Trump threatened to deploy military to the streets of American cities in response, saying he would send “thousands and thousands” of soldiers if governors did not shut down the protests. Trump called governors “weak” for not arresting people during a video conference call with state leaders, according to the Associated Press.

Sunday saw the largest number of arrests so far in Los Angeles County, including 700 in Los Angeles, 73 in Long Beach and more than 400 in Santa Monica. Vandalism and looting in Long Beach and Santa Monica left businesses destroyed in the three cities, including iconic destinations such as Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica and Pine Avenue and The Pike in Long Beach.

  • Black Lives Matter supporters hold a peaceful protest outside the Van Nuys Civic Center on Monday, June 1, 2020 to demand justice for George Floyd. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Protesters drive by a demonstration outside the Van Nuys Civic Center on Monday, June 1, 2020 where protesters were demanding justice for George Floyd. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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  • Protesters block an intersection and confront police in Anaheim on Monday, June 1, 2020. Hundreds gathered to protest a Minnesota police officer’s killing of an unarmed black man.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Hundreds of protesters gather in Anaheim in response to a Minnesota police officer’s killing of an unarmed black man.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Tommy Fullobe of Anaheim joins hundreds of protesters who gather in Anaheim in response to a Minnesota police officer’s killing of an unarmed black man.(Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Protesters clash with Riverside law enforcement Monday, June 1, 2020, in downtown Riverside after protesters failed to disperse during a protest for the death of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • LAPD guard firefighters as they mop up a fire that broke out in a strip mall at Haskel and Vanowen streets in Van Nuys, CA Monday, June 1, 2020. Looting erupted in the area after a peaceful George Floyd protest in Van Nuys, the cause of the fire is under investigation. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • SisterJohn Ellen Turner flashes a peace sign to protesters who pass St. Catherine’s Academy on Monday, June 1, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD officers arrest protestors for curfew violations on Main Street in Los Angeles, Monday, June, 2020. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • “George Floyd!” was chanted in downtown Riverside as several hundred protests his death on Monday, June 1, 2020. (Photo by Cindy Yamanaka, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators in Westwood took to the streets on Monday, June 1, 2020, to protest police abuse in the wake of the George Floyd, a black man who died in the custody of Minneapolis police. (Photo by David Rosenfeld)

  • Demonstrators in Westwood took to the streets on Monday, June 1, 2020, to protest police abuse in the wake of the George Floyd, a black man who died in the custody of Minneapolis police. (Photo by David Rosenfeld)

  • Protesters take over the intersection of Victory and Van Nuys Boulevards on Monday, June 1, 2020 to demand justice for George Floyd in Van Nuys. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Protesters take over the intersection of Victory and Van Nuys Boulevards on Monday, June 1, 2020 to demand justice for George Floyd in Van Nuys. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A large group of protestors took over streets in Hollywood to protest the death of George Floyd Monday, June 1, 2020. The group started at Sunset and Vine and marched through Hollywood streets blocking traffic at times. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A large group of protestors took over streets in Hollywood to protest the death of George Floyd Monday, June 1, 2020. The group started at Sunset and Vine and marched through Hollywood streets blocking traffic at times. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A large group of protestors took over streets in Hollywood to protest the death of George Floyd Monday, June 1, 2020. The group started at Sunset and Vine and marched through Hollywood streets blocking traffic at times. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore apologized to business owners, saying his officers were overwhelmed by the “forces of those that wish to exact violence in the community.” The department tempered its response initially to avoid intimidating the peaceful protests, he said. Eighty-eight buildings on Melrose Avenue alone were destroyed, according to Moore.

Moore, along with other county law enforcement officials, pledged to scale up their presence with assistance from from the National Guard. Some 2,000 troops will have deployed in the city by Tuesday, June 2, Moore said. The police chiefs urged protesters to work with law enforcement and to call out anyone who uses the protests as an opportunity to loot and vandalize.

“We need that communication, because in the absence of it, we have to overwhelm,” Moore said. “We have to bring in resources that will appear to stifle the message.”

Residents and business owners started their week cleaning up broken glass and pillaged storefronts in Long Beach, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, San Bernardino and Hemet. Police chiefs in Santa Monica and Long Beach, in particular, took flak from residents who believed their departments did not do enough to protect property.

Jack Sarkissian, owner of Jack’s Jewelers in Santa Monica, said looters spent two hours in his store despite his calls to police.

“They just didn’t do anything,” he said, adding that the looters had “all the time they needed to get anything they needed.”

A petition calling for the removal of Santa Monica Police Chief Cynthia Renauld garnered more than 3,000 signatures as of Monday afternoon. Renauld at a press conference warned her department would catch those responsible for the coordinated looting at Santa Monica shops.

“We have been going through the city collecting that evidence. We have had our residents sending us videos and license plates,” Renauld said. “We’ll work through this one day at a time to ensure that we protect justice, civility and safety in the community, while still ensuring that right for people to talk to us through peaceful protest and the expression of what they’re feeling.”

Renauld said about 95 percent of those arrested in Santa Monica did not live in the city.

The protests in Southern California before nightfall Monday were largely peaceful, with small pockets of looting in some areas.

The movement spilled into the San Fernando Valley for the first time Monday with hundreds of peaceful protesters converging in Van Nuys at what was supposed to be a canceled event. Looters used the cover of the growing protest to hit businesses along Van Nuys Boulevard, reportedly raiding a Boost Mobile store, a dispensary and a pharmacy. At one point, some members of the crowd threw water bottles at officers guarding boarded up shops near the Civic Center.

Looters hit a jewelry store and CVS in Encino while protesters occupied police in other areas of the city.

Elsewhere, thousands of protesters gathered again in downtown Los Angeles, where some at City Hall yelled for National Guardsmen to “go home.”

Police fired rubbers bullets to try to disperse roughly 200 demonstrators blocking lanes on the 405 Freeway near UCLA in Westwood. The crowd left the freeway and splintered after being given a five-minute warning to leave the area.

The initial event was organized by the Student Activist Project at UCLA, which had actually tried to call off the event.

Others marched along Hollywood Boulevard carrying a sign that read “Say their names” and listing those who have died at the hands of police. The National Guard set up with Humvees in the area to try to contain the marchers, but there were no clashes as of Monday evening.

Police arrested looters in Van Nuys and at a Rite Aid in Hollywood later in the night.

Officers in Glendora kneeled alongside protesters for an eight-minute moment of silence as a sign of solidarity.

In Orange County, hundreds gathered in Anaheim’s La Palma Park in the first of three protests expected Monday. The protesters gathered in the grass and listened to speakers describing how police brutality had affected their lives.

“There’s a lot of people hoping you are going to lose your sanity and attack our city and we are here to prove them wrong,” a speaker said to the crowd, drawing loud cheers.

The protesters later merged with another group in front of Anaheim City Hall, but left as police enforced a 6 p.m. curfew.

In Riverside, more than 4,000 people protested peacefully against police violence. Many refused to leave once the 6 p.m. curfew rolled around. They clapped rhythmically as officers surrounded them and ordered them to disperse nearly an hour later.

Throughout Southern California, communities braced for another long night with businesses and civic buildings setting up barricades and police staging around potential targets for looters. In response to the looting over the weekend, Target announced it was temporarily shutting down stores across the nation, including 20 in Southern California. The retailer pledged to continue to pay workers’ salaries and benefits while the stores are closed.

Protesters laid on the ground and chanted “I Can’t Breathe” in West Covina near the 10 Freeway. Police closed off the entrances to the Eastland Center mall in advance.

Torrance’s Del Amo Fashion Center shut down early Monday and police officers blocked off the entrances using city buses.

San Bernardino County closed its offices and coronavirus testing sites early in the day to allow police to focus elsewhere.

Staff writers Nick Green, Ryan Carter, Pierce Singgih, David Rosenfield, Ruby Gonzales, Josh Cain, David Downey, Beau Yarbrough, Brian Whitehead, Jennifer Iyer, Kevin Smith, Hunter Lee, Olga Grigoryants, Ariella Plachta, Scott Schwebke, Jeong Park and Sean Emery contributed to this report.

Read more about Protests, looting continue in Southern California as new week begins This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

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Photos: Turbulent day careens into a violent night in Southern California

During the day, some protests proved boisterous and passionate. Others turned turbulent, confrontational and violent. And much of the chaos endured into the evening as lawlessness ruled after dark in scattered communities around Southern California.

  • A large building burns along Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Looters leap out the broken window of Walgreens after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

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  • A looter walks away with goods from a store along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Several hundred protesters threw fireworks and other explosives Saturday night at police while marching in Santa Ana, walking into traffic and shouting “black lives matter” in remembrance of George Floyd. (Photo by Mindy Schauer.Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • A lone demonstrator kneels in front of LAPD officers as they stand their ground in front of their headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Police form a blockade as a large building burns along Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march off of the southbound 71 Freeway on the Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • LAPD arrest a man along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A couple waits to be processed and arrested by police along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march off of the southbound 71 Freeway on the Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A firework is setoff as demonstrators march on the on the southbound 71 Freeway towards Rio Rancho Rd. offramp during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in Pomona on Saturday night, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators vent to police in riot gear during a protest of the death of a black man, George Floyd, in front of the Pomona Police station in Pomona on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A man in Santa Ana on Saturday night pushes a cart full of burning paper toward police, who responded by firing pepper balls. (Eric Licas/Southern California News Group)

  • A looted Sephora store in the Grove Shopping center in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A woman waits to be processed and arrested by police along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Workers board up Susie Cakes on 9th and Hope as dusk falls in a chaotic Dowtown Los Angeles on Saturday. Photo: Bradley Bermont

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of the LA Times building in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Looters grab goods from a store along Fairfax avenue in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of store fronts across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • A looted Apple store in the Grove Shopping center in Los Angeles, Saturday, May 30, 2020. A protest erupted into looting and rioting and face-offs with police leading to a curfew at 8pm due to violence throughout the city. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • A protester in Santa Ana kicks a flaming garbage can down Bristol in Santa Ana on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Protesters in Santa Ana hurl fireworks at police on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Demonstrators look on as artist Celos paints a mural of George Floyd along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A man looks at mannequins tossed from a window as demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD officers guard the headquarters as protestors make their way up the street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters leap out the broken window of Walgreens after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD confronts a man that doesn’t want to follow directions along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A looter breaks into a store and runs out with clothing front across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • A man in wheel chair rides past LAPD officers as they guard Broadway along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a Jewelry store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD arrest a man along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD officers point non lethal weapons at protestors along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Highway Patrol officers inspect the California Bear bank along 3rd after a break in after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD point non lethal weapons at protestors in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators look on as artist Celos paints a mural of George Floyd along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators graffiti’s a wall in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators block a street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators graffiti in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Demonstrators protest and riot as they break glass out of the LA Times building in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD prepares to fire on Demonstrator as they break glass out of store fronts across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators hold up their hands as LAPD blocks the street along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD tries to keep demonstrators and Looters back along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A demonstrator opens up a fire extinguisher along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Looters break into a Jewelry store along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest past City Hall death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators protest past City Hall death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators along Broadway after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • LAPD and guard at the entrance of the 110 Freeway at Grand as demonstrators march after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Store owners mark the store front “Don’t Touch, Black Owners” along 2nd street after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • A LAPD helicopter flies over downtown in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators hold signs and scream toward LAPD officers across from the LAPD headquarters in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • LAPD comes out in force along Broadway as looters breaking stores after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG

  • Demonstrators drives past the Million Dollar theatre where it reads Stay Strong LA along Broadway and 3rd Street after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators walk past LAPD officers guarding the headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators walk past LAPD officers guarding the headquarters after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • An LAPD officer stands guard along San Pedro Street as a man wearing a mask sits on the curb after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators march along 2nd street in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)demonstrators protest and riot in downtown after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

  • Demonstrators block 5th street in front of the LAPD after the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis during National Day of Protest in Los Angeles on Saturday, May 30, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/ SCNG)

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Spurred by the death of George Floyd, a Minnesota black man who died during a violent arrest, mammoth demonstrations rolled out for the fourth straight day in about a dozen communities around the Southland on Saturday, May 30. After dark — despite curfews installed by Los Angeles and other communities — clusters of looters smashed windows, robbed retail venues and set fires as law enforcement tried to keep pace.

 

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