Intended to protect consumers, Prop. 65 has become a threat to small businesses

When the voters of the state passed Proposition 65, we did so with the intent of protecting people from chemicals that are serious threats to the environment or people’s health.  We did not intend to create a method for unscrupulous attorneys to put small businesses out of business based on meritless technicalities. Unfortunately, Prop. 65 has been used quite a bit for the latter.

Proposition 65 works by requiring businesses to give proper warning to consumers when products contain dangerous chemicals that have been linked to cancer or birth defects.  A problem arises when the overzealous take this mandate too far.  We saw this first-hand recently in the debate over whether every coffee you order on your way to work needs to come with a cancer warning.  The overzealousness has two side effects: it can result in label fatigue – who takes warnings seriously if they are ubiquitous?

And it has a huge cost to small businesses.  The battle over labeling everyday items like coffee and beer, while sounding silly, was very real in my neck of the woods.  A local coffee shop was almost put out of business by someone who made absurd claims (and threats) based on the coffee shop serving him beer.  Thus, while Proposition 65 compliance can be a minor nuisance to large companies, it can mean a death sentence to smaller businesses.

Many lawyers genuinely care about the environment and health.  But when predatory lawyers come after small businesses for technical Prop. 65 violations, the businesses are often left with two bad choices: try to fight the claim in court or reach a settlement agreement, no matter how ridiculous the alleged violation may be.  Since many small-business owners know that even if they win in court, it will cost them a lot of money and time, they often settle just to be done with it.  Many of the bad actors also target business owners who speak poor English, thinking that immigrant business owners will be even more likely to settle.  This is morally wrong.

In my time in the legislature, I worked to curb aggressive Prop. 65 litigation by introducing legislation to protect small businesses and ensure that Prop. 65 is used as intended, rather than as a settlement cash cow for unscrupulous individuals. Under my proposals, businesses could be given proper warning before they suddenly find themselves blindsided by a lawsuit in which they are labelled as a defendant. After all, as we’ve seen, it can often be much more difficult than it appears to determine which products warrant special warnings under Prop. 65.

Now, it is time for the California legislature to pick up where I left off and make smart reforms to Prop. 65.  By better clarifying its requirements and reigning in loopholes that create an environment that fosters meritless litigation, we can both honor the original intent of the measure to keep people safe without risking our small business climate. Proposition 65 can play an important role in keeping our environment clean and our bodies healthy.  But it falls on our shoulders from time to time to update any good law to that we address abuses that have manifested.

Small businesses help to keep California’s communities and its economy strong.  By implementing the proper reforms, we can allow them to continue to grow and spark the innovation for which our state is known, without the fear of meritless lawsuits.

Mike Gatto, a Democrat, served four terms in the California State Assembly, in a district that includes Los Angeles, Glendale, and Burbank.

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Video: OC Varsity’s epic recap of the highlights for 2018-19

OC Varsity wraps up the 2018-19 sports year with Jonathan Khamis’ amazing recap of the year’s biggest games, most dramatic moments and the unforgettable celebrations. There are some behind-the-scenes moments, too, that might even surprise you.

– Videos by Jonathan Khamis, for the Orange County Register 

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Photos: The Register’s 2018-19 Athletes and Coaches of the Year banquet

The Register wrapped up the 2018-19 high school sports season with its annual Athletes and Coaches of the Year banquet on Wednesday night at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin. See all of the photos of the event, which honored more than 50 athletes and coaches.

  • John Humphreys, of Corona del Mar, accepts the Male Outstanding Competitor award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Kyliegh Wilkerson, of Trabuco Hills, accepts the Female Outstanding Competitor award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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  • John Humphreys, of Corona del Mar, accepts the Male Outstanding Competitor award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Kyliegh Wilkerson, of Trabuco Hills, accepts the Female Outstanding Competitor award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Sean Rhyan, of San Juan Hills, accepts the Male Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Randy Post, of Foothill, accepts the Girls Volleyball Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Scott Wittkop, of Laguna Beach, accepts the Boys Cross Country Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Anthony Grover, of JSerra, accepts the Boys Cross Country Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Patrick Bendzick, of St. MargaretÕs, accepts the Girls Cross Country Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • John Haygood, of Los Alamitos, accepts the Girls Golf Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Irene Kim, of Kennedy, accepts the Girls Golf Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Jake Kyman, of Santa Margarita, accepts the Boys Basketball Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cami Brown, of University, accepts the Girls Tennis Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Michael Pronier, of San Clemente, accepts the Boys Soccer Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Brooke Demetre, of Mater Dei, accepts the Girls Basketball Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Dennis Piramo, of Fountain Valley, accepts the Boys Wrestling Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Derek Mitchell, of Cypress, accepts the Boys Basketball Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Shane La Fortune, left, and Ted Clark, of Buena Park, accept the Girls Water Polo Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Breanna Carrillo, of Villa Park, accepts the Girls Soccer Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Maya Avital, of Corona del Mar, accepts the Girls Water Polo Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Blake Bowen, of San Clemente, accepts the Boys Soccer Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Guests watch the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Vincent Gomez, of Anaheim, accepts the Girls Basketball Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cameron Repetti, of Cypress, accepts the Baseball Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cameron Repetti, of Cypress, accepts the Baseball Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Max Rajcic, of Orange Lutheran, accepts the Baseball Pitcher of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Trey Munoz, of Trabuco Hills, accepts the Boys Wrestling Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Natalie Berty, of Mater Dei, accepts the Trinity Award from Mike Schabert, Associate Superintendent of Catholic Schools, left, and broadcaster Bob Gibson, during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Hunter Ingram, of Foothill, accepts the Boys Swimming Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Grace Uribe, of Huntington Beach, accepts the Softball Pitcher of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Ed Medina, of Godinez, accepts the Softball Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Jim Brumm, of Foothill, accepts the Boys Swimming Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Hunter Ingram, of Foothill, accepts the Boys Swimming Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Ayla Spitz, of Newport Harbor, accepts the Girls Swimming Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Craig Hanson, of Aliso Niguel, accepts the Baseball Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Ciara Briggs, of Orange Lutheran, accepts the Softball Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Tessa Green, of Santa Margarita, accepts the Girls Track and Field Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Aditya Gupta, of University, accepts the Boys Tennis Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Danny Werner, of Aliso Niguel, accepts the Boys Track and Field Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Peter Herold, of JSerra, accepts the Boys Track and Field Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • John Cahill, of El Modena, accepts the Boys Volleyball Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Dayne Chalmers, of Newport Harbor, accepts the Boys Volleyball Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Kelly Dullard, of Mater Dei, accepts the Girls Swimming Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Chase Frazier, of Mission Viejo, accepts the Girls Track and Field Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Kevin Groeninger, of St. MargaretÕs, accepts the Boys Lacrosse Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Cristina Johnson, of Foothill, accepts the Girls Lacrosse Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Charles Shea, of University, accepts the Boys Golf Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Mike Schreiber, of Yorba Linda, accepts the Boys Lacrosse Coach of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Bruce Sanborn of San Juan Hills, accepts the Boys Tennis Coach of the Year award, which he shared with Tim Di Leo, during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Sean Rhyan, of San Juan Hills, accepts the Male Athlete of the Year award during the Register’s Athletes and Coaches of the Year Banquet at the Marconi Automotive Museum in Tustin on Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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Stagecoach 2019: Jason Aldean gives a strong finish to the 13th annual country fest

Singer-songwriter Jason Aldean has become a Stagecoach Country Music Festival staple. He performed at the very first fest back when it was a two-day affair in 2007. He came back in 2010 for an earlier daytime set and headlined for the first time in 2012. He headlined again in 2014 and, like his peer and Friday night headliner Luke Bryan, he has now headlined Stagecoach a total of three times.

His sets are always strong, energetic, filled with all of his radio hits and he’s nothing if not consistent. He’s a solid and reliable performer and only further proved that Sunday night as he blasted out his hits including “Take a Little Ride,” “When She Says Baby,” “Any Ol’ Barstool,” “Tattoos on this Town,” “Amarillo Sky” and “Lights Come On.”

He is never really chatty in between songs but did introduce his single “Drowns the Whiskey,” which he did with fellow country artist Miranda Lambert. He also covered Brantley Gilbert’s “My Kinda Party” and played his latest single, his album title track, “Rearview Town.”

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

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  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean (center) performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • A fan sings along as country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • A country music fan watches Jason Aldean on a big screen as he performs on the Mane Stage to close out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country artist Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Country music fans watch as Jason Aldean performs on the Mane Stage as he closes out the Stagecoach Country Music Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio Sunday night April 28, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

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Old Dominion’s first time at Stagecoach was back in 2016. It was an early day set in the blazing sun and the quintet only had one single anybody knew, “Snapback.”  Now, the band is huge and has an arsenal of songs that fans sang loud and proud on Sunday evening, including “No Such Thing as a Broken Heart” “Written in the Sand,” “Make It Sweet” and the cleverly written “Song for Another Time” that features titles from a myriad of familiar Top 40 tracks. It was also a lot of fun to dance along to the bouncy single “Hotel Key.”

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Throughout the weekend, the men turned in stellar performances, however it was the ladies on the Mane Stage that definitively brought the fire. Cam was so lively and entertaining on Saturday night and “American Idol” runner-up Lauren Alaina had the audience in the palm of her hand from the start of her sunset performance on Sunday.

The 24-year-old has certainly proven she’s much more than just a reality TV singer. She’s scored several radio hits that fans went wild for at Stagecoach, including “Road Less Traveled” and her latest single, “Ladies in the ’90s” went over huge as she gave shout outs to artists like Reba McEntire, Britney Spears, Dixie Chicks, Shania Twain, Christina Aguilera and more.

Since she is a newer artist, she was also smart to insert some really fun covers and medleys like Guns ‘N Roses “Paradise City” and a medley that included Aerosmith’s “Walk This Way,” “The Middle” by Zedd and Maren Morris, Shawn Mendes’ “There’s Nothing Holdin’ Me Back,” “Everybody” by Backstreet Boys, “Brand New Man” by Brooks & Dunn and “Man! I Feel Like a Woman” by Shania Twain. She also brought up probably one of the best audience members to sing and dance along to her song “Next Boyfriend.” Not only did he know all of the lyrics, he had some sweet moves, too.

Over in the Palomino, Tom Jones may have been an unlikely candidate for Stagecoach, but delivered one of the best sets of the festival. The set times were a little wonky upon arrival due to Mane Stage opener Jordan Davis and Palomino performer Mark Chesnutt dropping off day-of-show due to illness.

However, it all worked out and SiriusXM Spotlight Stage performer Mitchell Tenpenny, who is known for hits such as “Drunk Me” and “Alcohol You Later,” got a better, later time slot on his stage, however he made the ultimate flub and announced that he was at Coachella rather than Stagecoach. He did quickly take ownership of his error and if he keeps cranking out hits like he has, I’m sure the Stagecoach overlords will forgive the slip and he’ll end up on the Mane Stage in the future.

Stagecoach Country Music Festival

When: Sunday, April 28

Where: Empire Polo Club, Indio

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Coachella 2019: Childish Gambino changes his tune and embraces fans cellphone usage

Donald Glover, known as Childish Gambino, had a change of heart and embraced his fans throughout his Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival weekend two set.

Gambino broke away from his “put away your cellphones” mindset from weekend one by embracing his fans’ phones Friday, April 20.

“I’m not against pictures and (expletive),” Gambino told the audience, even though he bared media outlets such as this one from photographing his set. “Just bring (the energy) for me.”

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The same energy the performer asks of his fans is the same type of energy that his fans appreciate about him.

“I just like him as a person and his personality,” said Coachella attendee Candice Lodge. “He is really smart and he is the nerdish type.”

Childish Gambino’s #Coachella Weekend 2 set is a complete 180 from the Weekend 1 performance.

He loosened up on the “put your phone away” rule and took selfies with the fans instead of sharing a ‘smoke.’ pic.twitter.com/XRzFGPrBzW

— James H. Williams @ Coachella (@JHWreporter) April 20, 2019

Gambino took a group selfie with his audience, one week after sharing a blunt with a weekend one fans.

“I loved it,” Nikki Warmsley said. “Artists forget there fans and when you smoke a blunt with someone that means so much. It’s personal. Our ancestors do that.”

Weekend two festival goers knew very little about his Gambino’s weekend one performance after avoiding the Coachella live stream last Friday.

“I never watched him live before so I am pretty excited,” Julie Hamilton said after buying some exclusive Gambino Coachella merchandise. “I didn’t watch the stream because I wanted to be surprised. I saw some things on social media, but I just didn’t watch.”

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Recipes: Spice up your matzo ball dishes this Passover

“Why is this night different from all other nights?” goes the famous question in the Haggadah, the prayer book of the ceremonial Seder dinner of Passover, the eight-day Jewish festival that begins on Friday evening, April 19th.

If there had been a question, “How is your Passover menu different from your past ones?”, our reply this year would be, “It’s our matzo balls that are different!” We decided to break with tradition and to season our matzo balls with Mediterranean and Middle Eastern flavors.

When Passover comes, we think of the family holiday dinners of our childhoods. My mother, who was born in Poland and cooked Ashkenazi (Eastern European Jewish) cuisine, made light, fluffy matzo balls, which we called by their Yiddish name, kneidelach. Actually, she made them during the rest of the year too, but on Passover somehow they seemed special, perhaps because they were so satisfying during this period when the only “bread” allowed was matzo.

I still make matzo balls the way my mother taught me, but I also like to prepare matzo balls that taste different from hers, incorporating the flavors used by my in-laws in Israel. My spinach matzo balls are speckled with green and are studded with pine nuts; my fresh turmeric root matzo balls have an orange hue; and my matzo balls flavored with chermoula (Moroccan marinade) are dotted with cilantro.

Lovers of bold flavors will enjoy our Moroccan-inspired chicken soup with fennel seeds, saffron and fresh green fava beans. The matzo balls we add to this soup are flavored with cumin, garlic, paprika and cayenne. You might also like to try our Yemenite chicken soup seasoned with turmeric and cumin, based on the spicy soups made by Yakir’s Yemen-born mother.

I wish I could have served our new matzo balls to my mom.


Spinach matzo balls are speckled with green and are studded with pine nuts. (Photo by Yakir Levy)

Springtime chicken soup with spinach matzo balls

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

INGREDIENTS

2 to 2 1/2 pounds chicken pieces, preferably legs and thighs

1 large carrot, cut in 5 or 6 chunks

1/2 pound medium asparagus (about 8 spears), bases reserved, spears cut in three

1 large onion, quartered

3 celery ribs with leafy tops, cut in three

6 parsley stems (leafy tops reserved)

11 cups water

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Spinach and pine nut matzo balls (see variation of turmeric root matzo balls recipe)

1 or 2 large or 6 baby carrots; or 2 baby orange, baby yellow and baby purple carrots, peeled if needed, diagonally sliced about 1/4 inch thick

1/4 pound sugar snap peas, ends pulled off together with any strings

1 or 2 tablespoons chopped dill leaves and fine stems

2 or 3 tablespoons chopped parsley leaves

PROCEDURE

1. Put chicken in a soup pot, large saucepan or stew pan.   Add carrot chunks, asparagus bases, onion, celery, parsley stems and 10 cups water.

2. Bring to a boil, skimming foam a few times. Cover and cook over low heat for 10 minutes. Skim thoroughly.

3. Add a pinch of salt and pepper.  Adjust heat so that soup simmers very gently.  Cover and cook until chicken is very tender and soup is well flavored, about 2 hours, skimming occasionally.

4. Discard pieces of vegetables and herbs (or reserve for other uses).  Remove chicken pieces. If desired, set aside 2 or 3 chicken pieces for another meal. Cool remaining pieces slightly and discard their skins and bones. Cut or pull meat in strips and reserve.

5. Strain soup. If possible, refrigerate it overnight.  Skim fat thoroughly.

6. Prepare matzo balls.

7. Bring soup to simmer, add 1 cup water and skim fat again. Return to a simmer, add reserved chicken strips and heat through.  Reheat matzo balls in their cooking liquid if necessary.

8. Shortly before serving, bring 2 cups of soup to a simmer in a small saucepan.  Add orange and yellow carrot slices (but not purple ones, if using) and asparagus stem pieces and return to a simmer. Cover and cook over medium heat for 4 minutes. Add asparagus tips and sugar snap peas and cook until vegetables are done to your preference, about 2 or 3 more minutes.  Remove vegetables with a slotted spoon, cover them loosely to keep them warm, and return their cooking broth to rest of soup.

9. If using purple carrots, keep them separate until serving time so they won’t discolor the soup. Put them in a small saucepan with 3/4 cup water; bring to a simmer and cook for 6 minutes or until just tender. Remove them with a slotted spoon and reserve them in a small bowl.

10. Add chopped dill and parsley to hot soup. Taste and adjust seasoning.

11. To serve, put 2 or 3 heated matzo balls in each soup bowl using a slotted spoon, and ladle hot soup over them. Add a few chicken strips and vegetable pieces to each bowl, adding purple carrot slices last.


Yemenite style chicken soup with turmeric root matzo balls is served with a mild version of red schug, a Yemenite pepper and garlic relish. (Photo by Yakir Levy)

Yemenite style chicken soup with turmeric root matzo balls

This soup is served with a mild version of red schug, a Yemenite pepper and garlic relish.

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

INGREDIENTS

2 to 2 1/2 lb chicken pieces, preferably legs or thighs

1 large onion, quartered

Thick stems of 6 cilantro sprigs (leaves reserved)

11 cups water

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 turmeric root about 2 inches long, minced (about 2 tablespoons) (wear gloves when handling)

4 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

1/4 teaspoon ground pepper, or to taste

Salt to taste

Turmeric root matzo balls (see recipe)

Mild red schug (optional, see recipe)

2 or 3 zucchini, cut in 2-inch sticks

2 plum tomatoes, diced

2 or 3 tablespoons chopped cilantro leaves

PROCEDURE

1. Put chicken in a soup pot, large saucepan or stew pan. Add onion, cilantro stems and 10 cups water.

2. Bring to a boil, skimming foam a few times. Cover and cook over low heat for 10 minutes. Skim thoroughly.

3.  Add cumin, turmeric root, garlic, ground pepper and a pinch of salt.  Adjust heat so that soup simmers very gently.  Cover and cook until chicken is very tender and soup is well flavored, about 2 hours, skimming occasionally.

4. Discard onion and cilantro stems.  Remove chicken pieces, cool slightly and discard skin and bones.  Refrigerate 2 or 3 chicken pieces for another meal. Cut meat from remaining chicken pieces in strips. Put them in a container, cover and refrigerate.

5. Strain soup. If possible, refrigerate soup overnight.  Skim fat thoroughly.

6. Prepare matzo balls and schug.

7. Bring soup to simmer, add 1 cup water and skim the fat again. Return to a simmer, add reserved chicken strips and heat through.  Reheat matzo balls in their cooking liquid if necessary.

8. Shortly before serving, bring 3 cups of soup to a simmer in a medium saucepan.

Add zucchini, return to a simmer and cook uncovered 2 or 3 minutes or until done to your taste. Add diced tomato and heat through.  Remove vegetables with a slotted spoon, cover them loosely to keep them warm, and return their cooking broth to rest of the soup.

9. Add chopped cilantro to the soup.  Taste and adjust seasoning.

10. To serve, put 2 or 3 heated matzo balls in each soup bowl using a slotted spoon, and ladle hot soup over them. Add a few vegetable pieces and chicken strips to each bowl. Serve schug separately.


Schug (also spelled zehug), a Yemenite relish, is made with mild Red Fresno chiles. (Photo by Yakir Levy)

Mild red schug (pepper garlic relish)

This schug (also spelled zehug), a Yemenite relish, is made with mild Red Fresno chiles. If you would like hot red schug, use red jalapenos; or make hot green zehug with green jalapenos or serrano chiles.

Yield: about 1/2 cup, about 6 to 8 servings.

INGREDIENTS

5 Red Fresno chiles or other mild chiles

1/4 cup garlic cloves (about 1 ounce), peeled and quartered

1/4 teaspoon salt

2 to 3 teaspoons water

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

PROCEDURE

1. Remove stems from chiles. Remove seeds if desired so the schug will be milder. Cut chiles in chunks. Put garlic, chiles and salt in mini food processor and puree until finely chopped and well blended. If necessary, add 2 or 3 teaspoons water, just enough to enable food processor to chop mixture until smooth. Add olive oil and puree.

2. Transfer to a small bowl for serving or to a jar for refrigerating. Schug can be kept, covered, up to 1 week in the refrigerator.


Tumeric root matzo balls are made with the root, eggs and matzo meal. (Photo by Yakir Levy)

Turmeric root matzo balls

For spinach and chermoula matzo balls, see variations. To make traditional matzo balls, omit turmeric.

Yield: 20 to 24 matzo balls

INGREDIENTS

3 large eggs

1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon olive oil, or vegetable oil such as grapeseed oil or safflower oil

About 3 to 5 tablespoons water

2 tablespoons finely grated peeled turmeric root (about 1.5 oz or 2 three-inch turmeric roots)

3/4 teaspoon fine salt

1/4 teaspoon ground pepper

2/3 cup matzo meal (sometimes labeled matsah meal) (about 2 1/2 ounces)

1/4 teaspoon Passover baking powder (optional)

About 7 to 8 cups water (for simmering)

1/4 teaspoon coarse salt

About 3 cups strained chicken soup or vegetable broth (for storing and reheating)

PROCEDURE

1. Using a fork, beat eggs with oil, grated turmeric root, fine salt, pepper and 1 tablespoon water in a medium bowl until blended. Mix matzo meal and baking powder in a bowl. Add to turmeric mixture and stir with a wooden spoon to a smooth batter.  Stir in 1 tablespoons water to make a soft batter.

2. Cover and refrigerate for about 30 minutes.

3. Stir batter. Add about 2 tablespoons more water by tablespoons, adding enough so that mixture is just firm enough to be formed in rough-shaped balls; it should be soft.

4. Bring 7 or 8 cups water to a boil in a saucepan and add coarse salt. Reduce heat to medium or medium-low so that water bubbles gently. Prepare a small bowl of cool water. Moisten your hands, measure a mounded teaspoonful of batter and remove it from spoon. Transfer batter from one palm to the other, gently rolling it to a roughly round ball. Drop matzo ball into simmering water. Continue shaping matzo balls and adding them to pan, moistening your hands after every two or three.

5. When all of matzo balls are in the pan, raise heat and return liquid to a simmer. Cover and cook over low heat until matzo balls are tender, about 30 minutes.

6. With a slotted spoon, gently transfer matzo balls to another saucepan for reheating or to a container to refrigerate them. Ladle enough chicken soup over matzo balls to cover them.

7. Cover matzo balls and keep them warm until ready to serve; or refrigerate them.  Reheat them in their chicken soup in a covered saucepan over low heat, without stirring.  Serve hot.

Spinach and pine nut matzo balls

Omit turmeric. Add 2 tablespoons finely chopped pine nuts to matzo meal mixture. Rinse 6 ounces spinach leaves (about 3 cups firmly packed) and remove any stems. Add spinach to 4 cups boiling water, return to a full boil, stirring, and remove from heat. Remove spinach with slotted spoon to a bowl of cold water. Drain and rinse. Put spinach in a strainer with a bowl underneath. Squeeze spinach by handfuls in strainer, reserving the squeezed spinach liquid in the bowl. Puree spinach with 2 tablespoons of reserved spinach liquid to a fine puree. Add to egg mixture. When making batter, use reserved spinach liquid instead of water.


Chermoula matzo balls are made with garlic and chopped cilantro. (Photo by Yakir Levy)

Chermoula matzo balls

Omit turmeric. Finely chop 2 large garlic cloves in mini food processor.  Add 1/2 cup (lightly packed) cilantro leaves without any stems and pulse until chopped.  Transfer to a small bowl.  Add 2 tablespoons olive oil or vegetable oil, 1 teaspoon ground cumin, 1 teaspoon paprika, 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper and 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper. Mix well.  Add to egg mixture.


Moroccan-inspired chicken soup with chermoula matzo balls can also include fava beans as well as saffron and fennel seeds. (Photo by Yakir Levy)

Moroccan-inspired chicken soup with chermoula matzo balls

Fresh fava beans are Passover favorites among Moroccan and other North African Jews. If your family doesn’t eat beans on Passover, you can omit them. Saffron and fennel seeds give this soup a lovely aroma.

INGREDIENTS

1 small fennel bulb

2 to 2 1/2 pounds chicken pieces, preferably legs and thighs

1 carrot, cut in 5 or 6 chunks

1 large onion, quartered

6 thick cilantro stems (leaves reserved)

11 cups water

Chermoula matzo balls ((see variation of turmeric root matzo balls recipe)

2 pinches saffron threads

1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds

1 1/4 pounds fava beans in pods or 3/4 to 1 cup peeled fava beans (packaged steamed or frozen)

1 turnip, tops and bottoms removed, peeled, quartered and sliced

1 carrot, sliced diagonally about 1/4 inch thick

2 small celery ribs, peeled if stringy, sliced thin

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 large zucchini, halved and sliced

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

2 or 3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

PROCEDURE

1. Pull off outer layer of fennel. Quarter the fennel bulb.  Cut off and discard core at bottom of each piece.  Reserve outer layer and core and a few 2-inch pieces of fennel stems for flavoring the soup and put them in a soup pot, a large saucepan or a stew pan. Cut rest of fennel in thin slices crosswise.

2. Add chicken pieces, carrot chunks, onion, fennel trimmings and cilantro stems to soup pot. Add 10 cups water.

3. Bring to a boil, skimming foam a few times. Cover and cook over low heat for 10 minutes. Skim thoroughly.

4.  Add a pinch of salt and pepper.  Adjust heat so that soup simmers very gently.  Cover and cook for 2 hours.

5. Discard pieces of vegetables and herbs (or reserve for other uses).  Remove chicken pieces. If desired, set aside 2 or 3 chicken pieces for another meal. Cool remaining pieces slightly and discard their skins and bones. Cut or pull the meat in strips and reserve.

6. Strain soup. If possible, refrigerate it overnight.  Skim fat thoroughly.

7. Prepare matzo balls.

8. Bring soup to simmer, add 1 cup water and skim fat again. Add saffron and fennel seeds to the soup and cook for 20 minutes.

9. Shell fava beans. Add beans to a saucepan of 4 cups boiling water. Return to a boil. Cook uncovered over medium heat for 10 minutes or until tender. Drain, rinse, and peel: peel smooth end slightly, squeeze other end and bean will come out of its thick skin.

10. Before serving, bring soup to a simmer.  Reheat matzo balls in their cooking liquid if necessary.

11. In a medium saucepan bring 3 cups of soup to a simmer.  Add turnip slices and return to a simmer. Cover and cook over medium-low heat for 3 minutes.  Add carrot slices, celery, fennel strips and garlic and return to a simmer. Cover and cook for 3 minutes. Add zucchini, bring to a simmer and cook uncovered over medium-low heat until vegetables are done to your preference, about 2 or 3 minutes.  Remove vegetables with a slotted spoon, cover them loosely to keep them warm, and return their cooking broth to rest of soup.

12. Add cooked fava beans and chicken strips to hot soup and heat through. Add chopped cilantro.  Taste and adjust seasoning.

13. To serve, put 2 or 3 heated matzo balls in each soup bowl using a slotted spoon, and ladle hot soup over them. Add a few chicken strips and vegetable pieces to each bowl.

Note: Some people of Mediterranean or African origin have an inherited allergy to fava beans. If your family or a guest has this allergy, omit them or substitute lima beans or edamame.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Disneyland won’t loosen costume policy for Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge

Visitors to Disneyland’s new Galaxy’s Edge themed land will be able to browse through clothing inspired by movie wardrobe pieces, but Disneyland’s strict costume policy means they won’t be able to wear some of the clothing they buy within the Anaheim theme park.

The new 14-acre land opening May 31 at Disneyland will be set in the on the Star Wars planet of Batuu in the remote outer rim village of Black Spire Outpost.

An apparel shop in the Black Spire marketplace will sell a line of handmade robes, tunics, hooded scarves and belts based on wardrobe pieces from the “Star Wars” cinematic universe. Disney’s merchandise team worked closely with Lucasfilm’s archives division to turn movie wardrobe pieces into authentic-looking clothing.

Visitors over the age of 13 will not be able to wear the Star Wars robes and some other Galaxy’s Edge merchandise in the theme park, Disneyland officials said. Disneyland currently sells stormtrooper helmets and other items that violate the costume policy and can’t be worn in the park.

Disneyland visitors 14 and over are not permitted to wear costumes into the parks although “Disney bounding” is permitted. Disney bounders dress in color schemes and design patterns that mimic the look and style of their favorite characters. Visitors of all ages can wear costumes during some separate-admission after-hours events at Disneyland and Disney California Adventure.

“We believe that our current costume policy allows a lot of Disney bounding and opportunity to come and live your story,” Disneyland Vice President Kris Theiler said.

Disneyland employees will wear costumes that place them into three distinct camps in Galaxy’s Edge: First Order soldiers, Resistance rebels or Black Spire Outpost villagers.

Employees dressed as villagers will get to choose from a mix-and-match collection of costumes that can be assembled into 80 combinations. Cast members will get to pick their own pieces from a selection of tunics, wraps and vests as well as accessories like necklaces, scarves, hats and belts.

The First Order and Resistance looks will be more pre-determined for employees. The bad guy First Order soldiers will wear sleek military-style uniforms. The good guy Resistance rebels will wear flight crew gear with a jacket, vest and goggles on their hat.

Walt Disney Imagineering, the creative arm of the company, has created an immersive and interactive environment in Galaxy’s Edge designed to let every visitor live their own Star Wars hero story.

Visitors will play a role in a continually developing storyline that evolves and progresses throughout the day. Fail in your mission aboard the Millennium Falcon: Smugglers Run attraction and a bounty hunter might tap you on the shoulder looking for a vengeful space pirate’s lost loot.

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Want to visit Disneyland’s Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge? Brace yourself for big crowds and long lines

Disneyland visitors with reservations to Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge during the initial “soft opening” period can expect to wait in hours-long lines to get into the new land, ride the Millennium Falcon attraction, visit the cantina and experience the build-your-own lightsaber and droid shops.

Hardcore Star Wars fans heading to Disneyland for the May 31 grand opening of Galaxy’s Edge or on June 24 — the first date that reservations won’t be required — will also have to brave an overnight lineup just to get into the Anaheim theme park.

The reservation-only soft opening gives Disneyland an opportunity for a controlled introduction of Galaxy’s Edge and a chance to understand how visitors react and respond to Black Spire Outpost on the Star Wars planet of Batuu, the setting for the new 14-acre themed land.

Disneyland will restrict access to Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge between May 31 and June 23 to visitors with reservations. Each registered guest staying at the Disneyland Hotel, Disney’s Grand Californian Hotel or Disney’s Paradise Pier Hotel during the initial 24-day window will receive one reservation to Galaxy’s Edge. A limited number of theme park visitors not staying in one of the three hotels will be able to make reservations for Galaxy’s Edge. Disneyland has not yet released details on how the free reservation system will work.

Once inside the land, visitors who want to experience the Millennium Falcon: Smugglers Run ride, Oga’s Cantina cocktail bar, Savi’s Workshop — Handbuilt Lightsabers shop or Droid Depot store during the soft opening period will have to get into first come, first served queues at each location. None of the attractions, restaurants or experiential shops in the new land will take reservations during the soft opening period.

It will be difficult to do everything in one visit to Galaxy’s Edge during the initial 24-day reservation period. Visitors should expect hours-long waits for the lone attraction operating on opening day, the intimate must-see cantina and the boutique build-your-own experiences.

Disneyland will reassess the need for reservations at Oga’s, Savi’s and Droid Depot after June 24, when reservations will no longer be needed to access Galaxy’s Edge. A virtual queue system in development for Galaxy’s Edge will allow visitors to wander around other areas of Disneyland while waiting to enter the new Star Wars land. The digital system won’t be instituted until after the soft opening period.

Disney’s rival Universal Studios had one of the largest grand openings in theme park history with the 2010 debut of the Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Islands of Adventure in Florida, which generated 10-hour lines just to get into the themed land on opening day.

The Avatar: Flight of Passage flight simulator at Disney’s Animal Kingdom in Florida generated 6-hour queues when it debuted in May 2017 before settling down to 2- to 3-hour average wait times.

Touring Plans, which uses big data and statistical analysis to calculate daily crowd sizes and ride wait times at theme parks, anticipates visitors could encounter 6-hour waits for Millennium Falcon: Smugglers Run on opening day of Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland.

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Wait times for the marquee Millennium Falcon attraction will be affected by two key factors. First, Disneyland will not offer FastPasses for the ride during the soft opening period. Second, Rise of the Resistance, the other major attraction in Galaxy’s Edge, won’t open until later this year, reducing the overall ride capacity for the new land.

Fortunately, Disneyland has vast expertise in attraction queue management.

Disneyland plans to offer atmosphere talent, mobile app games and snack vending options for those waiting in line for Smugglers Run. Riders waiting in the Falcon queue will be able to get a bathroom pass and rejoin their party at the FastPass merge location in the attraction. Disney plans to eventually offer the same bathroom relief in the Rise of the Resistance queue when the attraction opens.

A Disneyland initiative dubbed Project Stardust — a mash-up of Star Wars and pixie dust — has been preparing for the massive crowds expected to descend on Galaxy’s Edge by taking a comprehensive park-wide look at operations, infrastructure and crowd management with an eye toward improving efficiency, traffic flow and access.

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Here’s how many time the Oscars has not had a host

No host? No problem.

The 91st Academy Awards will not have a host after Kevin Hart, who accepted the job, stepped down amid controversy over his past tweets. The Oscars have not had a host several times.

There’s something about years ending with a 9 and the show not having a host. This will be the sixth Academy Awards to not have a host, following 1939, 1969 and 1989.

Hosts with the most

  1. Bob Hope, 18
  2. Billy Crystal, 9
  3. Johnny Carson, 5
  4. Whoopi Goldberg, 4
  5. Jack Lemmon, 4 (two as co-host)

Host it notes

At the first ceremony, the winners had been announced three months before. From 1930-1940 the academy kept the results secret but gave an advance list to newspapers to enable next-day publication. This was discontinued after the Los Angeles Times published the winners in its evening edition in 1940.The sealed-envelope system began in 1941.

  • 1940: Bob Hope hosts for the first of a record 18 times.
  • 1943: 45-second speech limit is set.
  • 1953: First televised ceremony.
  • 1966: First color TV broadcast.
  • 1969: International broadcasts begin.
  • 1969-71: There was no official host. Awards were presented by Friends of Oscar, including Bob Hope, John Wayne, James Earl Jones, Barbra Streisand, and Raquel Welch.
  • 1979: In Johnny Carson’s first opening monologue, he says, “As you well know by now, this is the 51st Academy Awards. Two hours of sparkling entertainment spread out over a four-hour show.”
  • 1989: For the first time in 17 years, there is no master of ceremonies. Awards are handed out by various actors.
  • 1994: Whoopi Goldberg becomes the first woman and first African-American to serve as the solo host. She goes on to host three more times.
  • 1998: 57.25 million viewers tune in the year “Titanic” wins and Billy Crystal is host.
  • 2002: Longest ceremony: 4.5 hours. Whoopi Goldberg is host.
  • 2008: Jon Stewart’s last time hosting gets one of the smallest TV audiences for the ceremony in 20 years: 31.8 million viewers.
  • 2009: Hugh Jackman’s low-budget opening montage referencing the recession receives a standing ovation.
  • 2010: The first telecast to have more than a single host since 1987. Steve Martin and Alec Baldwin share the stage.
  • 2011: James Franco and Anne Hathaway host. The show is ranked the worst ever by TV Guide and Variety.
  • 2013: Seth MacFarlane’s song referencing breasts is criticized as crass and inappropriate.
  • 2016: In Chris Rock’s opening segment, he says, “No black actors nominated. I thought about stepping down as host, but the last thing I need is to lose another job to Kevin Hart.”

Hosts by the year and U.S. TV viewers (starting in 1974)

* Not all hosts listed# Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences president

Oscars hosts

Sources: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Box Office Mojo, Internet Movie Database, Nielsen Media Research Inc., Variety, TV Guide Photos by The Associated Press

 

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3 dead, 4 injured in Torrance bowling alley shooting

Police say three people were killed and four people were injured in a shooting late Friday night at a bowling alley in Torrance.

The Torrance Police Department says officers responded to calls of “shots fired” at the Gable House Bowl shortly before midnight.

Multiple victims were found with gunshot wounds inside Gable House Bowl, which is described on its website as a gaming venue that offers bowling, laser tag and a full arcade.

Police say three men died at the scene. Four male victims were injured. Two of them were transported to a local hospital for unknown injuries and the other two sought out their own medical attention.

Torrance is a coastal city about 20 miles from Los Angeles.

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