High School Football Preview 2019: All of our stories, lists, rankings, photos and more

This is the place to find all of the Register’s high school football preview content for the 2019 season.

All of the stories, rankings, lists, photos and more.

Make sure you check it out before the games begin.


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The Southern California News Group’s High School Football Preview magazine is included for subscribers in the Sunday, Aug. 18 edition of the Orange County Register. The magazine is also available for purchase at the Register’s office in Anaheim during regular business hours.

The Southern California News Group’s High School Football Preview magazine was published Sunday, Aug. 18 and was available to subscribers.

PLAYER RANKINGS

OCVarsity Hot 150: Our list of the top impact players for 2019

Top Quarterbacks

Top Running Backs

Top Wide Receivers

*More position rankings coming soon.

 

TEAM RANKINGS


Mater Dei football players Myles Murao (74), Kody Epps (4), Dean Neely (52), Bryce Young (9), Tai Marks (73) and Nate White (20) in Santa Ana, CA, on Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

No. 1 Mater Dei

No. 2 JSerra

No. 3 Mission Viejo

No. 4 Corona del Mar

No. 5 Servite

No. 6 Villa Park

No. 7 Los Alamitos

No. 8 La Habra

No. 9 Orange Lutheran

No. 10 Tesoro

*The full Orange County Top 25 will be published Monday, Aug. 19.

 

NEWS, ANALYSIS & PREDICTIONS


A Santa Ana fan waves a school flag during the CIF-SS Division 12 quarterfinals game against Godinez at Santa Ana Stadium in Santa Ana on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

The Best of Friday Night Lights: Where are the best places to watch HS football?

Top story lines for the 2019 season

Week-by-week look at the top matchups

Preseason All-County Team

New CIF-SS playoff format designed to deliver exciting competition

 

UNDER THE RADAR 2019

Under the Radar Teams

Under the Radar Players

 

MEDIA DAYS

Fryer on football: Trinity League media day was lively, informative

Fryer on football: Public schools accomplish their goals with own ‘media day’

 

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Police in Dayton, Ohio, say 9 killed and at least 16 injured in shooting

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — Nine people in Ohio have been killed in the second mass shooting in the U.S. in less than 24 hours, and the suspected shooter is also deceased, police said.

Dayton police tweeted that an active shooter situation began in the Oregon District at 1:22 a.m., but that officers nearby were able to “put an end to it quickly.” At least 16 others were taken to local hospitals with injuries, police said.

The suspected shooter’s identity has not been released.

Miami Valley Hospital spokeswoman Terrea Little said 16 victims have been received at the hospital, but she couldn’t confirm their conditions. Kettering Health Network spokeswoman Elizabeth Long said multiple victims from a shooting had been brought to system hospitals, but didn’t have details on how many.

The Oregon District is a historic neighborhood near downtown Dayton that’s home to entertainment options, including bars, restaurants and theaters. Police have not said where in the district the shooting took place.

The FBI is assisting with the investigation.

The Ohio shooting came hours after a young man opened fire in a crowded El Paso, Texas, shopping area, leaving 20 dead and more than two dozen injured. Just days before, on July 28, a 19-year-old shot and killed three people, including two children, at the Gilroy Garlic Festival in Northern California.

More coming on this story.

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Roundup: Newport Beach 14-and-under boys capture Junior Olympics

IRVINE Newport Beach Water Polo’s 14-and-under boys defeated Northern California’s 680 Drivers 12-9 to capture the Junior Olympics at the Woollett Aquatics Center on Tuesday.

It was Newport Beach’s first title in the 14-and-under division. The club has twice won the 10-and-under division.

Incoming Newport Harbor High freshman Ben Liechty was selected tournament MVP for the squad guided by Coach Stefano Ragosa.

Liechty, a left-handed center, is the younger brother of Newport Harbor graduate Jake Liechty (UC Irvine) and junior-to-be Eli Liechty.

Newport Beach’s 18-and-under boys, featuring the top players from Newport Harbor High, finished fifth. The team lost in the tournament to L.A. Premier 7-6 and Stanford 10-6.

In the 18-and-under final:

Stanford 10, L.A. Premier 9: Stanford’s Andrew Churukian scored on a backhanded shot from center with 3:47 left in the fourth quarter to tie the score 5-5 and won the shootout 5-4.

Stanford goalie Griffen Price blocked a shot in the second round of shootouts and William Riley sealed the title with a goal in the final round.

 

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Sanders’s student loan debt proposal a bad idea: Letters

The proposal to eliminate student loan debt by presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is nothing more than an audacious attempt to buy the youth vote by promising future monetary rewards in exchange for supporting his candidacy.

College students are among the best and brightest that our country has to offer, and some of the recent graduates profiled in the paper have accomplished so much. They all clearly understand compound interest and hopefully have enough of a moral compass to understand that borrowed money must be paid back.

For students that come from lower income families, two years of community college (while employed and saving money) followed by two years at a university gives you the exact same outcome: a degree. This approach is affordable. Working while attending college gives the students either valuable experience or the necessary motivation from lower paid jobs to complete school.

Under this system, universities will have no reason to control spiraling costs. Students need to earn their way to degrees, not have their education paid for by others.Sen. Sanders, you do have good ideas. This is not one of them.

— Erik Wendehost, San Clemente

Here’s what’s offensive: Nike pulling flag shoe

Nike gets a call from Colin Kaepernick regarding its sneaker that displays the Betsy Ross flag from the American Revolution. He is offended by what the flag represents.

Kaepernick is a has-been former NFL quarterback who couldn’t get a gig because no NFL owner wanted to take a chance on him. They knew he would be booed out of every stadium in the country for his lack of respect for the American flag.

So Nike then decides to pull it from the market and discontinue the sneaker out of fear of offending someone. Now, Nike has offended me. Unless they reintroduce the Betsy Ross sneaker, I’m done with them.

— Charles Hunt, Mission Viejo

Electoral College protects small states from tyranny

Re “Time to get rid of the Electoral College” (Letters, July 4):

Letter writer Bob Hoffman’s call to end the Electoral College is unjustified. The concept is simple. The majority of voters of each state elect the president. A similar concept is senators from small states have the same power as the large states. That’s why we are named the United States. The Electoral College empowers small states against the tyranny of a few populous states.

— Jim Sorensen, Trabuco Canyon

Long Beach failed in reducing illegal fireworks

Before the city of Long Beach reports on this year’s Fourth of July illegal fireworks enforcement results, long-term residents also need to be heard. This was another year of epic failure in reducing the use of fireworks in our city.

The only data that matters is the number of citations and confiscations made from residential abusers. The number of service calls is irrelevant after years of disappointing response results.

Surely, patrol units did not need a citizen call to find the spectacular aerial displays in our neighborhoods. Perhaps next year a city campaign to encourage those who spend their money breaking the law with illegal and dangerous fireworks, could instead direct that money to funds for the homeless or animal shelters caring for lost and traumatized pets.

— Rhoda Cassell, Long Beach

Dems crazy policies

Re “California leaders propose rewards, fines to spur housing” (June 28):

Let me make sure I understand the last part of the of the article: “They (Sacramento Democrats) also agreed to tax people who refuse to purchase private health insurance and use the money to help families of four who earn as much as $150,000 a year to pay their monthly health insurance premiums.”

So if a family of four making $75,000 a year does not purchase private health insurance because they can’t afford it, they are then fined and the money given to another family of four who makes double that amount to help pay their monthly premiums. Wow. It’s scary to think what the Sacramento Democrats will come up with next.

— Ed Bjork, Fountain Valley

 

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Pageant of the Masters, Shakespeare at New Swan and more fun for July

NEW SWAN SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL


UCI Claire Trevor School of the Arts’ New Swan Shakespeare Festival runs July 3-Aug. 30.(photography courtesy of newswanshakespeare.com)

It’s no secret the greatest box-office challenge to the English language’s most profound playwright and poet was not Shakespeare’s rival, Ben Johnson, nor Christopher Marlowe, but bear-baiting, by which some coward, no doubt in stretchy pants, teased some hapless animal into attacking him. The good news is, Shakespeare often came out on top because he didn’t write strictly for ivory tower chrome domes but for groundlings as well, the working stiffs who paid bare minimum to stand in front of the stage.

The good people at New Swan Shakespeare Festival are keenly aware of this group of proletarians long ignored by purveyors, pundits and connoisseurs. So, gather groundlings and chrome domes alike for the festival’s double bill of “The Merchant of Venice” (among the Bard’s greatest comedies) and “The Two Gentlemen of Verona” (among his earliest), performed by company pros mixing with students in the drama department at UC Irvine.

WHEN: July 3-Aug. 30

WHERE: UCI Claire Trevor School of the Arts, 4004 Mesa Road, Irvine

COST: $13-$57

:: newswanshakespeare.com

 

ORANGE COUNTY FAIR

If you’re hungry, eat a banana. You don’t go to the Orange County Fair to eat, you go to fetishize food, obsess over it, explore boundaries and discover exotic flavors that will strain your limits. Offerings in recent years include caramel drizzled fries, peanut butter and jelly sriracha funnel cake, big skillet cookies and OC Crunch Cinnamon Roll.

“Fried pineapple,” says the Fair’s Terry Moore, adding to the list of county comestibles, “the largest tomato, best cupcake, even tablescaping,” which is exactly what it sounds like.

And there’s music, too, though the lineup skews more Oldchella than Coachella at the Pacific Amphitheatre – Smokey Robinson, Styx, Pat Benatar, Dwight Yoakam, Ziggy Marley, Chicago, The B-52’s and Seal, with English Beat and Ozomatli at the Hangar. The Mariachi Festival has expanded this year and is steps up from the Hangar to the Amphitheatre.

At the Sports Arena they’re rocking X-treme Motocross, ATV and Quad races, for people who love speed and bumps and hate their kidneys.

WHEN: July 12-Aug. 11

WHERE: OC Fairgrounds, Costa Mesa

COST: $7-$14

:: ocfair.com

PAGEANT OF THE MASTERS


Backstage at Pageant of the Masters. (photography courtesy of FOAPOM.com)

The theme of this year’s one-of-a-kind art/theater mashup in Laguna Beach is time travel, giving director Diane Challis Davy wide parameters within which to work. Inspired by the classic sci-fi novel by H.G. Wells, “The Time Machine,” Challis Davy and screenwriter Dan Duling weave together a mystery about a scientist, a bump on the head and a magical sketchbook by a celebrated son of Anchiano holding 15 clues that, yes, take us through a world of living artworks.

“We’re doing a piece called ‘The City of Paris,’ which is a Cubist work, and it’s very challenging,” Challis Davy tells Coast of the 1911 canvas by Robert Delaunay. “The most difficult and challenging ones are the more realistic pictures. We have a couple from the Victorian Age and because they’re photorealistic that becomes very difficult.”

What’s less difficult is mid-19th century romanticist Jean-Leon Gerome’s epic canvas of “Napoleon and his General Staff in Egypt,” which begins the show, though that’s not to imply that history started with the vanquishing of bedouins. It didn’t. It began with nudes, perhaps even the trio of them in Georges Seurat’s pointillist “Les Poseuses.” Vermeer’s “The Music Lesson” is a crowd pleaser, as are iconic images ranging from the “The Day the Earth Stood Still” movie poster to Salvador Dali’s “The Nobility of Time” (floppy watch and all). The show ends on a culinary note with daVinci’s “The Last Supper,” all set to music by a full orchestra.

WHEN: July 7-Aug. 31

WHERE: 650 Laguna Canyon Road, Laguna Beach

COST: $20-$198

:: foapom.com

 

SAN CLEMENTE OCEAN FESTIVAL


San Clemente Ocean Festival, July 20-21. (photography courtesy of oceanfestival.org)

Get the little ones ready for the Dolphin Dash and the “Groms Rule” Surf Contest, and get the big ones ready for the Lifeguard Competition (first place takes $500). Get the rest ready for a roster of athletic battles like this year’s new additions, Tandem Boogie Boarding and the Pier Bowl Surf Classic. Add those to the Annual 5K Run, Dory Boat races, Open Ocean Paddle, Biathlon, One Mile Ocean Swim and just about everything else you can do but relax at the beach.

Of course, you could always just watch. There are no awards for that, but knowing you spent a weekend lolling in the sun instead of burning an actual calorie while others sweat and tumble all around you has its own virtues.

And while you’re in San Clemente, stop by Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens for a glance at artist Levi Ponce’s new mural related to SoCal’s coastline and ocean life on view through Sept. 8. Ponce is a rising star whose work has been exhibited at The Skirball Center and The Craft and Folk Art Museum.

WHEN: July 20-21

WHERE: San Clemente Beach

COST: free

:: oceanfestival.org

 

ALSO SPOT-WORTHY:

Jethro Tull by Ian Anderson, July 6, FivePoint Amphitheater, Irvine

Los Lobos, July 14, OC Fairgrounds, Costa Mesa

Beck and Cage the Elephant, July 17, FivePoint Amphitheatre, Irvine

Jefferson Starship, July 18, The Coach House, San Juan Capistrano

Ted Nugent, July 23-24, The Coach House, San Juan Capistrano

 

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San Juan Hills’ Sean Rhyan is the Register’s Male Athlete of the Year

Sean Rhyan, like most big guys who play football, is a nice guy off of the field.

Sometimes during his sophomore and junior years he was too nice on the field to opposing players. That had to change.

  • Sean Rhyan of San Juan Hills has been named The Orange Country Register’s Boys Athlete of the Year. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • Sean Rhyan of San Juan Hills has been named The Orange Country Register’s Boys Athlete of the Year. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

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  • Sean Rhyan of San Juan Hills has been named The Orange Country Register’s Boys Athlete of the Year. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • Sean Rhyan of San Juan Hills has been named The Orange Country Register’s Boys Athlete of the Year. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • Sean Rhyan of San Juan Hills High School competes in the Boys Varsity Shot Put during the CIF State Track and Field meet at Buchanan High School on Friday, May 24, 2019 in Clovis, California. (Photo by Libby Cline Birmingham, Contributing Photographer)

  • Sean Rhyan of San Juan Hills High School competes in the Boys Varsity Shot Put during the CIF State Track and Field meet at Buchanan High School on Friday, May 24, 2019 in Clovis, California. (Photo by Libby Cline Birmingham, Contributing Photographer)

  • San Juan Hills’ Sean Rhyan is on The Register’s 2018 All-County football team. Photographed in Anaheim on Saturday, December 15, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • San Juan Hills offensive lineman Sean Rhyan is the top recruit in UCLA’s class and the No. 5 recruit in California, according to 247Sports. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • San Juan Hills’ Shane Roberson, Carson Lewis and Sean Rhyan listen to the national anthem before a CIF-SS Division 2 Round 1 game against Edison at San Juan Hills High School on Friday, November 2, 2018 in San Juan Capistrano, Calif. (Photo by Josh Barber, Contributing Photographer)

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“After my junior year,” Rhyan said, “I didn’t care about being nice to people. You’re there to play football. ‘You’re on the field and I’m on the field, and what happens is going to happen.’ ”

What happened was he became an outstanding offensive tackle his senior year at San Juan Hills High. Rhyan, 6-foot-4 and 311 pounds, was All-Orange County first team and All-CIF this past fall. He was ranked as one of the top offensive lineman prospects in the nation and signed with UCLA.

Rhyan also was among the top throwers in California track and field. He was CIF-Southern Section Division 1 champion in the shot put and finished third in the event at the CIF State Championships.

For his excellence in both sports, Rhyan is the Register’s Orange County male athlete of the year.

Not bad for a nice guy who had not tried either sport until he got to high school.

“I wasn’t interested in football,” he said. “I played rugby. In rugby you run with the ball and you tackle. Two basic forms of football, I guess.

“Rugby kind of got me tough, in a way. It was fun, too.”

Rhyan spent his freshman year at Capistrano Valley Christian High School, one of Orange County’s small private schools. Figuring that a higher level of football competition would take him to a higher level of performance, Rhyan and his parents decided he would transfer to the larger San Juan Hills.

Rhyan had designs on being a tight end at San Juan Hills. The San Juan Hills coaches correctly identified Rhyan as an offensive lineman.

He was All-South Coast League first team as a junior in 2017 and, after San Juan Hills moved to the Sea View League for the 2018 football season, he was All-Sea View League first team this past fall.

He also was a Sea View League offensive player of the year, an award that infrequently goes to a lineman.

Rhyan’s athleticism is unusual for a lineman. He has a vertical jump of 34 inches and was timed in the 40 at 5.4 seconds.


San Juan Hills’ Sean Rhyan is on The Register’s 2018 All-County football team. Photographed in Anaheim on Saturday, December 15, 2018. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)

When track and field people talked about Orange County’s better throwers coming into this season Rhyan’s name was not included in the first few sentences of the conversation. He started throwing the shot and discus as a sophomore.

“I was not very good,” Rhyan acknowledged.

But, as he did in football, Rhyan’s ascension in the throwing events was fast and consistent.

He threw the shot put this season a personal-best 63 feet, 3.5 inches at the Orange County Championships in April. Rhyan won the CIF-SS Division 1 shot put title with a heave of 59-5.

Next was a 61-7.5 in the shot put at the CIF-SS Masters Meet. At the CIF State meet in Clovis his 61-6.5 got him third place, which in March seemed unlikely.

Rhyan’s mark of 155-8 in the discus was the eighth-best in Orange County this season.

His track and field days are over. Now it’s time for college football, and time to get mean again.

“We told him,” said San Juan Hills football coach Robert Frith, “’you’ve been big your whole life and you’ve been told to take it easy on the little guys. But now your job is to not take it easy on the little guys. Bring the nasty.’ ”

Rhyan is ready to take the nasty to UCLA.

“The coaches are good at UCLA,” Rhyan explained of his decision to play for the Bruins, “and the school is even better. I think in the future UCLA is going to be on the rise. Coach (Chip) Kelly has something cooking and I’m excited to be part of it.”

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Chapman baseball opens NCAA Division III World Series on Friday vs. Washington & Jefferson

The Chapman University baseball team opens the NCAA Division III baseball championships in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on Friday at 8 a.m. PT against Washington & Jefferson College of Washington, Pa.

The Panthers (38-11) are making their 15th postseason appearance since joining Division III in 1995, but it’s their first CWS trip in eight years. They advanced to the eight-team, double-elimination World Series by sweeping Concordia University (of Texas) in a best-of-three super regional last weekend, taking the decisive game in walk-off fashion at Hart Park in Orange.

“It’s great for us to have a chance to play in the series,” said Chapman coach Scott Laverty, who took over the program three years ago. “It’s been a while since we have, and this will be a phenomenal experience for the players, for the seniors who have worked hard to get here and the younger players to be a part of this as a learning experience.”

Chapman won its only other Division III national title in 2003, but the program has enjoyed plenty of success beyond that. Chapman’s 1968 team won the Division II crown, the school’s first-ever national title in any sport. Once the Panthers transitioned to Division III in 1995, more success followed with CWS appearances in 1997, 2000 (finishing third) and 2001. The Panthers made six more CWS appearances after the 2003 title, including a third-place finish in 2006 and a runner-up finish in 2011.

These sixth-ranked Panthers are led by stingy pitching. Senior right-hander Tyler Peck (7-3, 1.72 ERA) leads Division III with 150 strikeouts in 104-1/3 innings, and sophomore closer Nick Garcia, also a right-hander, has nine saves and a 0.56 ERA in 48 innings. Peck and Garcia were named first-team All-Americans by D3baseball.com and added the same honor from the American Baseball Coaches Association on Thursday.

In the postseason, Laverty has leaned on the duo in the clinching game in each round. Peck went six innings in Game 5 against Whitman (Wash.) College then handed the ball to Garcia for the final nine outs. They used a similar formula in Game 2 of the Super Regional against Concordia last weekend. The Panthers walked off in the bottom of the ninth in both games as the duo combined for a 0.50 ERA and 24 strikeouts.

Tristan Kevitch and Jarod Penniman have paced the Chapman offense during its postseason run. After hitting .266 in the regular season, Kevitch is batting .556 (15 for 27) with five doubles and a home run in the playoffs. Penniman, a smooth-fielding shortstop, is hitting .444 (12 for 27) in the postseason and scored on a wild pitch to end the super regional.

“We knew we had a good team, and this was in our sites,” Laverty said of the CWS.

Washington & Jefferson is one of just two teams in the field (Webster, Mo. is the other) that did not play a home game during regional or super regional competition.

The Presidents swept their way through a regional at 12th-ranked Salisbury (Md.) University and swept super regional host Misericordia (Pa.) University to earn their second World Series berth in three seasons. The Presidents (37-11) are 16-2 in their last 18 road games, have won eight straight games overall and 34 of their last 38 overall.

The Presidents are led by a trio of seniors at the top of their lineup: center fielder Dante Dalesandro (.360 batting average, .459 on-base percentage, .522 slugging percentage, 41 RBIs, 14 stolen bases), second baseman Mullen Socha (eight HRs, 18 doubles, .600 slugging percentage, 49 RBIs, 51 runs scored, 14 stolen bases) and left fielder James Artale (seven HRs, 44 RBIs, .551 slugging percentage).

Junior right-hander Ben Marsico (11-1, 3.29 ERA) anchors a Washington & Jefferson pitching staff that includes senior right-handers Mitchell Taufer (3-0, 0.83 ERA, 32-2/3 innings) and Clay Martin (11 saves, five in the postseason) at the back of the bullpen.

Chapman will play its second game at 8 a.m. or 11:15 a.m. PT on Saturday, depending on the outcome of Friday’s opener.

The winner of the four-team double-elimination Pool A, which also includes 18th-ranked Webster and 23rd-ranked UMass-Boston, will advance to the best-of-three championship series against the Pool B winner. Pool B consists of No. 7 Babson (Mass.) College, No. 22 Johns Hopkins University (Md.), No. 15 Birmingham Southern (Ala.) College and Heidelberg (Ohio) University.

Tyler (of Texas) won the 2018 title in its first trip to the CWS. The Patriots swept Texas Lutheran in the best-of-three series 8-1 and 9-6 in Appleton, Wisc., where the tournament was played from 2000-2018.

DIVISION III COLLEGE WORLD SERIES

All games at Veterans Memorial Stadium, Cedar Rapids, Iowa; all times are PT

Friday

BRACKET 1:

Game 1: Chapman (38-11) vs. Washington & Jefferson (37-11), 8 a.m.

Game 2: Webster (37-11) vs. UMass-Boston (35-12), 11:15 a.m.

BRACKET 2:

Game 3: Babson (38-8) vs. John Hopkins (35-11), 2:30 p.m.

Game 4: Birmingham Southern (39-13) vs. Heidelberg (35-13), 5:45 p.m.

Saturday

BRACKET 1:

Game 5: Loser of Game 1 vs. Loser of Game 2, 8 a.m.

Game 6: Winner of Game 1 vs. Winner of Game 2, 11:15 a.m.

BRACKET 2:

Game 7: Loser of Game 3 vs. Loser of Game 4, 2:30 p.m.

Game 8: Winner of Game 3 vs. Winner of Game 4, 5:45 p.m.

Sunday

Game 9: Loser of Game 6 vs. Winner of Game 5, 8 a.m.

Game 10: Loser of Game 8 vs. Winner of Game 7, 11:15 a.m.

Game 11: Winner of Game 6 vs. Winner of Game 9, 2:30 p.m.

Game 12: Winner of Game 8 vs. Winner of Game 10, 5:45 p.m.

Monday*

Game 13 (if nec.): Winner of Game 11 vs. Loser of Game 11 , 10 a.m.

Game 14 (if nec.)**: Winner of Game 12 vs. Loser of Game 12, 10 a.m. or 1:30 p.m.

* Should neither of these game go to the “if necessary” game, the best-of-3 championship series begins at 10 a.m.

** If Game 13 is not necessary, Game 14 will be played at 10 a.m.

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CIF-SS baseball playoffs: Friday’s scores, updated schedule

Scores from the CIF-SS baseball playoff games on Friday and the updated schedule.

BASEBALL

DIVISION 1

Quarterfinals

Harvard-Westlake 4, Orange Lutheran 3

Huntington Beach 2, Aliso Niguel 1

Cypress 5, Yucaipa 1

Quarterfinal

Saturday, May 11, 3:15 p.m.

Mira Costa at La Mirada

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 14, 3:15 p.m.

Huntington Beach vs. Harvard-Westlake at O’Malley Field, Encino

TBD vs. Cypress

DIVISION 2

Quarterfinals

Santa Margarita 4, El Segundo 0

Redondo 5, Oaks Christian 3

Crescenta Valley 3, Quartz Hill 0

Norco 4, Villa Park 1

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 14, 3:15 p.m.

Santa Margarita at Redondo

Crescenta Valley at Norco

DIVISION 3

Quarterfinals

Yorba Linda 11, Serra 7

Great Oak 4, Northview 3

La Canada 2, Ocean View 1 (11 inn.)

Oak Hills 3, Torrance 2

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 14, 3:15 p.m.

Yorba Linda at Great Oak

La Canada at Oak Hills

DIVISION 4

Quarterfinals

Sonora 9, Irvine 0

Kennedy 5, Loara 0

Summit 4, Mary Star 0

Quarterfinals

Monday, May 13, 3:15 p.m.

Alhambra at Canyon Springs

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 14, 3:15 p.m.

TBD vs. Sonora

Kennedy at Summit

DIVISION 5

Quarterfinals

Pasadena Poly 2, Estancia 0

Rancho Verde 6, Rialto 3

Xavier Prep 5, Century 4

Orange Vista 4, Salesian 2

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 14, 3:15 p.m.

Pasadena Poly at Rancho Verde

Xavier Prep at Orange Vista

DIVISION 6

Quarterfinals

Costa Mesa 5, Vista del Lago 3

Calvary Murrieta 33, El Monte 5

St. Anthony 6, Faith Baptist 0

Rio Hondo Prep 5, Carpinteria 0

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 14, 3:15 p.m.

Calvary Murrieta at Costa Mesa

Rio Hondo Prep at St. Anthony

DIVISION 7

Quarterfinals

Santa Maria Valley Christian 14, United Christian 4

Arroyo 5, Edgewood 0

Rosemead 11, Southwestern Academy 1

Pasadena Marshall 3, Bosco Tech 2

Semifinals

Tuesday, May 14, 3:15 p.m.

Arroyo at Santa Maria Valley Christian

Pasadena Marshall at Rosemead

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Coachella 2019: For possible attendees, Kanye West’s Sunday Service is about location, location, location

Kanye West will take the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival attendees to church Easter morning with an exclusive weekend two Sunday Service at the campgrounds near lot 4B.

The performance will be just a few hours after West joined Kid Cudi on the Sahara Tent stage to close out day two of the festival.

If you want to watch West’s service in person, fans will need to get up bright and early to secure a good seat. While the event starts at 9 a.m., the parking lots open and shuttles start running at 6 a.m.

But for those who don’t have a Weekend 2 wristband, or a desire to wake up early, the performance will be featured on the YouTube stream.

The schedule has received mixed reactions from the festival crowd.

“I feel like it is exciting but it is a little bit inconvenient just because it is in the morning,” said Jana Hagekhalil, who is staying in a nearby hotel for the festival. “I used to be a Kanye fan but not so much these days.”

She planned to skip the service.

Meanwhile, on-site campers such as Lorena Lopez will wait until the morning of before making a commitment to see West, who headlined Coachella in 2011.

“The third day is always rough,” Lopez said. “It just depends on how my body feels.”

Unlike those who have to make the extra effort to get back to the festival from their off-site accommodations, the unconventional location could benefit Coachella car campers.

“They are literally performing right next to my campsite,” Adrian Gulpane said on Friday afternoon. “I heard the sound check and they’re going to play a lot of good stuff.”

Gulpane believes that West could still add preaching to his performance despite what he heard during the soundcheck.

Long before West made the announcement about his regular faith-based concert coming to Coachella on social media a few weeks ago, there had been speculation that he would be one of the headliners for the 2019 festival.

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Dueling use-of-force bills spur heated Capitol debate

Community activists packed the state Capitol on Tuesday as an Assembly committee mulled a controversial measure that would require police officers to conform to a stricter standard before using deadly force.

Assembly Bill 392 by Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego, is one of two high-profile police use-of-force bills making its way through the Legislature.

Police and activists don’t agree on much, except that the issue has become highly emotional and is in need of legislative action. Police organizations argue that AB392’s changes could endanger officers as they make split-second decisions. Reformers say that too many Californians — especially African-American and Latino men and mentally disabled people — have been unnecessarily killed by officers in recent years.

It is a life-and-death issue that hasn’t been reviewed for eons. In fact, California’s lethal-force law dates back to 1872. The Assembly Public Safety Committee ultimately voted 5-2 to approve the Weber bill, but it faces a rocky road given the opposition from some of the most powerful political forces in the state. Indeed, a couple of lawmakers supported the bill not because they necessarily agree with its content, but because they want to keep the conversation alive.

Specifically, the Weber bill “Limits the use of deadly force by a peace officer to those situations where it is necessary to defend against a threat of imminent serious bodily injury or death to the officer or to another person,” according to the Assembly analysis. It’s the same bill she introduced last year, but it has garnered more momentum this year after police shot to death a Sacramento man whose cellphone they mistook for a gun.

The alternative law enforcement-backed measure is Senate Bill 230, which would leave the use-of-force standard the same, but would require local agencies to adopt new policies. It also calls on a state agency to establish new standards and guidelines. The bill includes some attorney general-recommended reforms, but is the epitome of a “do little” bill, given that it punts on the toughest issues, mainly calls for more training and gives agencies a pretext to ask for more taxpayer money to do what they already should be doing: training officers to de-escalate situations and deal with difficult encounters.

Under current law, police officers may use deadly force if it is deemed to be “reasonable.” In reality, officers almost always say they feared for their life and that using their weapon was reasonable under the circumstances. That’s often true, but not always. District attorneys are reluctant to press charges given the broad nature of the standard. Even when video footage reveals a troubling decision by the officer, that decision usually is deemed “reasonable.” Changing that standard to “necessary” would be a substantive change.

Police have to make quick decisions, but so do members of the public in some police interactions. “They can be in the right place, they can say the right thing, they can have the right attitude when approached by an officer, and still find themselves in situations that take their lives,” Weber said.

We’re not sure her bill is the ideal approach, but its specific and substantive proposals are far more likely to keep a real and necessary conversation going than a superficial alternative designed mainly to give nervous legislators political cover.

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