Football roundup: Cypress, Hurtado rally on the road to stun Ventura in quarterfinals

Cypress’ football team rallied from a 17-point deficit on the road to defeat Ventura 33-31 in a wild, CIF-SS Division 7 quarterfinal game Friday.

The Empire League champion Centurions (12-0) erupted for 33 unanswered points and then held on to extend the best start in school history.

Coach Rick Feldman’s fourth-seeded squad will play host to top-seeded Serrano (12-0) in the semifinals at Western High next week in a duel of undefeated teams.

Cypress led 33-17 with about three minutes left. Ventura (6-6) then scored and added the 2-point conversion to trim the lead to 33-25.

Ventura recovered an onside kick and scored again to trim the lead to 33-31 but Cypress stopped the 2-point conversion.

Standout running back Isaac Hurtado recovered another onside kick to cap an outstanding game. He rushed for 361 yards on 30 carries. He rushed for five touchdowns, including a 96-yard TD run.

Temecula Valley and West Ranch will clash in the other semifinal.

In Division 8:

Sunny Hills 49, Notre Dame of Riverside 24: Senior quarterback Luke Duxbury tossed two touchdowns and senior running back Jun Ahn rushed for three scores at Buena Park High as the top-seeded Lancers (10-2) reached the semifinals.

Sophomore Brandon Roberts also caught a touchdown and rushed for another score and Wilson Cal added six catches for 102 yards and a score.

Sunny Hills will play Trabuco Hills, a 34-7 winner against San Gorgonio, in the semifinals.

In late September, the Lancers defeated the host Mustangs 41-34.

In Division 11:

Marina 24, Ontario Christian 21: The host and No. 2 seeded Vikings (10-2) advanced to the semifinals for the first time since 1984. They will play Hemet (8-4) in next week.

More results to come. 

 

 

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Football roundup: Trabuco Hills’ late, goal-line stand holds off Aliso Niguel

Trabuco Hills forced an incomplete pass from its 3-yard line on the final play Friday to hold on for a 26-21 victory against host Aliso Niguel that settled second place in the Sea View League and rattled the CIF-SS Division 8 rankings.

The Mustangs (6-4, 3-1), ranked sixth in Division 8, knocked off the No. 1 Wolverines (7-3, 2-2) for second place behind San Juan Hills (4-0 in league).

Aliso Niguel coach Kurt Westling said late Friday night that he still believes his team will make the playoffs. The draw will be announced Sunday.

The Mustangs’ defense and special teams played well. Senior Chris Crow blocked a punt and that led to a touchdown. Crow and Anthony Raugi also had interceptions.

Sophomore Drew Barrett and Aiden Armstrong each rushed for scores for Trabuco Hills while Luke Holland kicked two field goals.

Trabuco Hills finished 2-8 for the third consecutive year in 2018 and missed the playoffs but has improved under first-year coach Mark Nolan.

More results to come

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Man shot, wounded at Santa Ana Halloween party

SANTA ANA — A man was hospitalized this morning with non-life threatening injuries suffered in a shooting at a Halloween party in Santa Ana.

Officers responded to a shots-fired call at a home in the 2200 block of South Orange Avenue, near East Anahurst Place, about 11 p.m. Thursday and found a man down in the street with two gunshot wounds to the upper body, according to Cmdr. Joe Marty of the Santa Ana Police Department.

The victim was taken to a hospital with non-life threatening injuries, Marty said.

A Halloween party was taking place in the backyard of home when the shooting occurred, Marty said.

A detailed description of the suspect was not immediately available. A motive for the shooting was not disclosed.

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Esperanza volleyball battles its way past Chaparral in Division 2 playoffs


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ANAHEIM — Esperanza dropped the first set in its CIF SS Division 2 second-round playoff match against Chaparral on Saturday at Esperanza High School.

The unseeded Aztecs were then on the verge of losing the second set to the No. 3 Pumas, but rallied back to win it, and then went on to win the match 22-25, 26-24, 25-22, 25-20.

Esperanza (20-5) will visit Westlake in a quarterfinal match on Wednesday.

Julia Waugh led the Aztecs with 19 kills and served four of her team’s 10 aces and teammate Elysse Stowell contributed with 16 kills and three blocks.

“I feel like we’ve kind of been building up to this moment for so long and I think we really turned it on,” Stowell said. “Positivity also really helped. We had all the passion. We knew we could do it.”

Brooklyn Frederick and Bella Rittenberg delivered 18 and 16 kills, respectively, to lead the Pumas (28-9).

The Aztecs took the lead early in the first set before the Pumas battled back and went on a 5-2 run down the stretch to win it.

Chaparral had leads of 22-18 and 23-21 in the second set and seemed on the verge of taking a two-set lead. But the Aztecs, behind a pair of back-row kills from Waugh and block by Kaylie Long, closed out the set on a 5-1 run to tie the match.

“I think we felt after the first game we didn’t play very well,” Esperanza coach Isaac Owens said. “We played better in game two and found a way to win, and then that definitely changed the momentum. If we lose that game, we were going to have a tough time, because they are a good team.”

The comeback win in the second set appeared to swing the momentum in favor of the Aztecs, who led throughout most of the third set.

The Pumas took a 4-1 lead early in the fourth set and had leads of 9-4 and 12-8 before Esperanza came back, led by kills from Waugh and Taylor Jones and a pair of aces from Madeline Harkey.

Clara Stowell’s kill to the back row ended the set and the match.

“I feel like they just played really well and they made plays,” Chaparral coach Gale Johnson said of Esperanza. “Sometimes we thought balls were going to be down and the rally was going to end, and they would save the play and the ball would come back over. They played great defense and sometimes that becomes frustrating for hitters. So our hitters started making mistakes or not swinging as aggressively.”

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Fryer on football: Two nights, two games, four teams show why high school football is alive and well


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Sometimes it seems that high school football is a dying sport.

The number of high school kids playing football has been dropping in California and elsewhere. Concussions are a concern. The growth of elite programs that are more like college teams than high school teams is not a great development, and neither is the number of high-profile transfers.

Then, on back-to-back nights in recent days, proof arrived that high school football is going to be OK.

Corona del Mar beat San Clemente 42-21 on Thursday at Newport Harbor High, Corona del Mar’s home field. Corona del Mar is like the San Diego Chargers of the early 1980s when the offense was called “Air Coryell,” named for Coach Don Coryell who installed an exciting and innovative passing game.

Corona del Mar’s smooth quarterback, Ethan Garbers, threw for 376 yards and four touchdowns. He has a great assortment of receivers, including John Humphreys, a Stanford commit, and the under-recruited Bradley Schlom (all he does is get open and catch the football … you know, maybe a couple of colleges can use a guy like that) and big, quick, sure-handed tight end Mark Redman.

Humphreys is the most un-coverable receiver in Orange County.


Four San Clemente defenders try to stop Corona del Mar wide receiver John Humphreys in Newport Beach on Thursday, September 26, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

Mater Dei has a great group of defensive backs, but line any of them up against Humphreys and the big (6-5, 205), fast Humphreys is going to win the battle for the football. The way Humphreys uses his body to screen out a defensive back when the ball is in flight is reminiscent of how Tony Gonzalez did that when Gonzalez was a tight end at Huntington Beach in the early 1990s.

It’s no coincidence that Gonzalez and Humphreys have been good on the basketball court, too.

After the game, though, is when you can see how special the game is to the Corona del Mar and San Clemente players. They played for their team, their school and each other.

As good as their athletes are, the togetherness of the players might really be Corona del Mar’s strong suit. Those long postgame hugs only happen when all of the time in the weight room, in the film room and on the practice pays off with a big win like it Thursday.

If San Clemente’s players felt they were in over their heads trying to match touchdowns with Corona del Mar, they did not show it, as the Tritons’ pride would not allow quarterback Nick Billoups and his teammates to let up. That “one-town-one-team” mantra in San Clemente football is not fake.

Cypress beat Capistrano Valley 42-28 on Friday at Western High, Cypress’ home field. Cypress has an intriguing mix of speed and physicality. The Centurions are going to be 10-0 when the regular season ends and are going to make a run at the CIF-Southern Section Division 7 championship.

Like the better teams, Cypress has that brotherhood that one finds in football perhaps more than in any other sport. It’s a high-sacrifice sport, with the lifting, the long hours of practice under the hot summer sun and the verbal, um, “motivation” at which football coaches seem to be so much more creative than other sports’ coaches.

Cypress running back Isaac Hurtado, who rushed for 176 yards and three touchdowns and turned a screen pass into a multi-tackle-breaking, go-ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter, was crying after the game. He tweaked his surgically-repaired knee in the second half, but that was not the source of the tears.

Cypress had lost to Capistrano Valley last season and in 2017. Hurtado, a senior, was overcome by the emotion of finally getting a win over the Cougars.

Capistrano Valley trailed in Friday’s game 28-0. The Cougars rallied to tie it before Hurtado, the dominant player of the first half, resumed his dominance in the fourth quarter. Capistrano Valley was getting out-hit and out-everything’d in the first half, but the Cougars’ pride kicked in and they made a stunning comeback in the second half to make it a great game.

The Cougars, led by quarterback Dartanyon Moussiaux and receivers Jack Haley and Brady Kasper, almost made that comeback a comeback win. They must have been bitterly disappointed when the game was over.

But when Capistrano Valley coach Sean Curtis finished his postgame talk to the Cougars players, they gathered in a tight huddle, raised their helmets and yelled “Capo!” with the energy of a team that had won the game.

They had given everything they had for their team, their school and each other.

Yes, high school football is going to be OK.

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USC QB Kedon Slovis leaves win over Utah with head injury

LOS ANGELES — USC starting quarterback Kedon Slovis left the first drive of the Trojans’ 30-23 win over No. 10 Utah with a head injury.

Head coach Clay Helton said that Slovis remembered what happened on the play when he left the field, but the medical staff did not clear him to return.

“You can tell that something was wrong, so we’d rather be careful with all our players and make sure their safety,” Helton said. “So we’ll see where it is going into next week. We got an extra day [before facing Washington].”

Slovis was driven into the turf after releasing a pass, hitting the back of his head against the field. The true freshman tried to stand up but collapsed back to the ground.

He was eventually helped off the ground and he slowly made his way over to the sidelines as Matt Fink came in to replace him. Slovis briefly went to the trainer’s tent before heading to the locker room, leaving USC with one healthy scholarship quarterback on the field.

Slovis had completed his first two pass attempts when he was taken out of the game. The true freshman was named the starter after JT Daniels left the season opener with a torn ACL. Prior to Friday, Slovis was 58 for 75 for 715 yards with five touchdowns and four interceptions.

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Irvine can lead fight on climate change, by transitioning to solar

Our biggest threat, locally to globally, is climate change.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns we have until 2030 to reduce our global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 45% to avoid a catastrophic outcome. Short of this, we can expect worsened droughts, diminished air quality and skyrocketing food prices. This reduction seems insurmountable. But it does not have to be. Our plan to harvest — and store — solar power can get us there.

Consider Irvine: We have the resources and motivation to go net-zero — even net-negative — in CO2 emissions within 10 years. Irvine previously led the way to save us from another existential threat: the destruction of the ozone layer by CFCs. Our city laid the groundwork to ban CFCs in 1989, the first municipality to do so.

A year later, cooperation between the city and UC Irvine’s Nobel laureate Professor of Chemistry Sherwood Rowland led to the creation of what is now ICLEI — Local Governments for Sustainability, the world’s largest organization of city governments sharing best practices in environmental policy. Irvine is positioned once again to be a world leader by reducing — even eliminating — CO2 emissions. The policy vehicle through which this may be achieved is Irvine’s recently passed drafting of a climate action plan.

Specifically, we advocate here for a staunch transition to solar energy use, which ought be a centerpiece of the Climate Action Plan. We calculate that the average resident’s electricity usage is about 2114 kWh, natural gas usage about 11,000 cubic feet and automobile usage is about 8,572 miles, all per year per person. This amounts to a total annual usage of 2.1 EJ for electricity, 3.2 EJ of natural gas heat and 2.4 EJ of electrical car transport energy for all of Irvine’s residents. The amount of solar energy touching Irvine’s rooftops is alone sufficient to power our residential electrical, heating and transportation needs.

This means that adding solar to our municipal and retail parking lots would bring our residents to net-negative carbon emissions, with power derived right here in our city. This plan is not dependent on the sun always shining. Around-the-clock energy source storage is available and cost effective for carbon-free electricity, in a recent Stanford-Berkeley study that showed that existing technologies can provide the storage.

Who would pay for it? Replacing fossil-fuel energy with cheaper solar and storage can be financed with zero or little up-front cost via existing arrangements like a solar lease or power-purchasing agreement that takes advantage of this cost benefit, and the city of Irvine could facilitate.

In addition to these solar energy-based solutions, we also point to Sonoma County’s model of funding rebate-based incentives for electric vehicles, and recommend it be replicated in Irvine. This type of incentive system makes the widening array of electric vehicle models put into market by Ford, BMW and Mercedes all the more accessible — and with it, the local emissions reduction to be gained.

This model is not only Irvine’s to implement, but can be part of the quick march to net zero for all of Southern California, and beyond. Irvine’s Climate Action Plan should be bold, attaining and even surpassing what we need globally in our local implementation. The lower cost of solar plus storage makes the financial potential available to transform our city’s energy usage to again become a global leader, with little cost up-front other than planning.

We have the resources and motivation, and with the proper partnerships across the public, private and academic sectors, a green, net-zero future can become reality.

Kev Abazajian is a professor of physics and of astronomy at the University of California, Irvine. Gianna Lum is the associate director of Climatepedia. Benjamin Leffel is a doctoral candidate in sociology at UC Irvine.

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Why you’re right to oppose homeless housing in your neighborhood

For people who support more government control and less freedom, the goal is always to break the connection between effort and reward.

That’s how they justify government redistribution of private property and anything else that one person enjoys but another person doesn’t have.

And that’s how a person who stays in school, doesn’t do drugs, works hard for years and eventually earns a good salary can be taxed to the max to help the “less fortunate,” while a person who makes horrendous life choices acquires a right to receive government checks.

The premise is that people do not deserve either the good or bad circumstances of their lives, so it’s morally right for government to mix it up a little.

One result of this type of thinking is a policy known as “economic integration,” offered as a solution to “economic segregation.” The idea is to have the government encourage “mixed-income” housing developments where people of different income levels all live in the same building. Government officials award the designated “affordable” housing units in the otherwise unaffordable location to a lucky few of “the less fortunate.” That makes the tenants who pay market-rate rents “the more fortunate,” as if they’re getting something they didn’t earn.

That’s how it’s done. Government power breaks the connection between effort and reward. The government’s power is enhanced, and all that’s left to do is hand out the awards for humanitarianism.

One way the government can implement this type of policy is to make housing construction next to impossible and then offer waivers granting permission for projects that meet particular government requirements. This has been the direction of policy in California. But it doesn’t create many units of “affordable housing,” and it raises the price of the market-rate units in the developments in order to cover the cost of the below-market units.

If the only goal was to end the housing crisis in California, there are other policies that would accomplish more. Reforming state laws that were passed to discourage exurban “sprawl” would open up land for new residential communities. Limiting the use of residential housing units for short-term rentals might create an oversupply of apartments overnight.

Of course, these policies would not accomplish the real goal, which is to increase government power. That’s accomplished by breaking the connection between effort and reward.

However, today there is an issue that threatens to end this game.

Throughout history, cities have had laws on the books to maintain the free use of sidewalks and the intended use of public spaces such as parks and plazas. There’s a reason for that, and if you drive around any city in California today, you can see the reason almost everywhere.

In California and elsewhere, laws against sitting, lying or sleeping on the sidewalk have been declared to be a violation of the civil rights of people that officials call, at least in Los Angeles, “our neighbors who are experiencing homelessness.”

City officials have pushed a “housing first” policy. They convinced voters to pass a tax increase that is supposed to build 10,000 units of supportive housing for the homeless with a $1.2 billion bond paid for by property owners. However, there’s something in the way: All the people who have worked hard to buy a house and who want to enjoy the fruits of their efforts in peace and safety.

People rightfully object to having their neighborhood made the site of a homeless housing development, along with the homeless service providers and drop-off sites likely to follow. They don’t want to see the “waiting list” for a homeless housing project spilling out onto the sidewalks that their kids use to walk to school. They don’t want their street turned into another block of Skid Row.

But when the goal is to sever the connection between effort and reward, it makes perfect sense to give away free apartments with no sobriety requirement for tenants, and to insult the tax-paying neighbors if they don’t like it.

The only way to break up this game is to throw the bums out. The politicians, that is.

Susan Shelley is an editorial writer and columnist for the Southern California News Group. Susan@SusanShelley.com. Twitter: @Susan_Shelley.

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High School Football Preview 2019: All of our stories, lists, rankings, photos and more

This is the place to find all of the Register’s high school football preview content for the 2019 season.

All of the stories, rankings, lists, photos and more.

Make sure you check it out before the games begin.


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The Southern California News Group’s High School Football Preview magazine is included for subscribers in the Sunday, Aug. 18 edition of the Orange County Register. The magazine is also available for purchase at the Register’s office in Anaheim during regular business hours.

The Southern California News Group’s High School Football Preview magazine was published Sunday, Aug. 18 and was available to subscribers.

PLAYER RANKINGS

OCVarsity Hot 150: Our list of the top impact players for 2019

Top Quarterbacks

Top Running Backs

Top Wide Receivers

*More position rankings coming soon.

 

TEAM RANKINGS


Mater Dei football players Myles Murao (74), Kody Epps (4), Dean Neely (52), Bryce Young (9), Tai Marks (73) and Nate White (20) in Santa Ana, CA, on Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

No. 1 Mater Dei

No. 2 JSerra

No. 3 Mission Viejo

No. 4 Corona del Mar

No. 5 Servite

No. 6 Villa Park

No. 7 Los Alamitos

No. 8 La Habra

No. 9 Orange Lutheran

No. 10 Tesoro

*The full Orange County Top 25 will be published Monday, Aug. 19.

 

NEWS, ANALYSIS & PREDICTIONS


A Santa Ana fan waves a school flag during the CIF-SS Division 12 quarterfinals game against Godinez at Santa Ana Stadium in Santa Ana on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

The Best of Friday Night Lights: Where are the best places to watch HS football?

Top story lines for the 2019 season

Week-by-week look at the top matchups

Preseason All-County Team

New CIF-SS playoff format designed to deliver exciting competition

 

UNDER THE RADAR 2019

Under the Radar Teams

Under the Radar Players

 

MEDIA DAYS

Fryer on football: Trinity League media day was lively, informative

Fryer on football: Public schools accomplish their goals with own ‘media day’

 

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Police in Dayton, Ohio, say 9 killed and at least 16 injured in shooting

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — Nine people in Ohio have been killed in the second mass shooting in the U.S. in less than 24 hours, and the suspected shooter is also deceased, police said.

Dayton police tweeted that an active shooter situation began in the Oregon District at 1:22 a.m., but that officers nearby were able to “put an end to it quickly.” At least 16 others were taken to local hospitals with injuries, police said.

The suspected shooter’s identity has not been released.

Miami Valley Hospital spokeswoman Terrea Little said 16 victims have been received at the hospital, but she couldn’t confirm their conditions. Kettering Health Network spokeswoman Elizabeth Long said multiple victims from a shooting had been brought to system hospitals, but didn’t have details on how many.

The Oregon District is a historic neighborhood near downtown Dayton that’s home to entertainment options, including bars, restaurants and theaters. Police have not said where in the district the shooting took place.

The FBI is assisting with the investigation.

The Ohio shooting came hours after a young man opened fire in a crowded El Paso, Texas, shopping area, leaving 20 dead and more than two dozen injured. Just days before, on July 28, a 19-year-old shot and killed three people, including two children, at the Gilroy Garlic Festival in Northern California.

More coming on this story.

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