We must see homeless people as human beings: Letters

Re “Pushing hard to change public perception” (Nov. 11):

Regarding this article about whether or not the hearts and mind of people could be changed in order to support housing homeless people, I strongly believe that they can be changed.

In my hometown of Anaheim, I have seen an increase in homeless people, especially after the closing of the riverbed. The homeless had to find new places to live and most relocated to nearby parks like Boysen Park.

I believe that a homeless person has not chosen to be in that situation, but there are so many other factors that make it difficult to find affordable housing. I believe we can change the mind of society by informing them and educating them on the issue.

I have dealt with the homeless on several occasions and they are human beings just like the rest of us. They are looking for an opportunity and a way to change their lives just like we all do.

There should be information meetings that offer more information about homelessness and what we can do as a society to help and not see the homeless as a problem or burden.

Also, having classes in both English and Spanish will help get the message out clearer and make people informed.

— Ruby Felix, Anaheim

Thank you for defending judicial independence

Re “Chief justice, Trump spar in rare scrap over judges” (Nov. 22):

Thank you, Chief Justice John Roberts. For the longest time I have felt that too many judges seem to go well beyond interpreting the law to creating or amending it for ideological purposes.

To discover that it is not so is a great source of relief to myself and many others.

— Tony Wolcott, Newport Beach

Gavin Newsom’s tweet

People, get ready. Our new entitlement Governor-elect Gavin Newsom is just warming up with this tweet about the southern border invasion:

“These children are barefoot. In diapers. Choking on tear gas. Women and children who left their lives behind — seeking peace and asylum — were met with violence and fear. That’s not my America. We’re a land of refuge. Of hope. Of freedom.”

How many of these lawbreakers is Newsom putting up at his home? It’s going to come from your wallet, not his or his elitist backers’.

— Arnold Gregg, Anaheim Hills

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Cal State Fullerton expert finds the Monkees were a steppin’ stone to cultural change

  • Rosanne Welch, Cal State Fullerton lecturer in cinema and television arts, is the author of a book on the Monkees.

    Rosanne Welch, Cal State Fullerton lecturer in cinema and television arts, is the author of a book on the Monkees.

  • Rosanne Welch is a lecturer in cinema and television arts at Cal State Fullerton. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

    Rosanne Welch is a lecturer in cinema and television arts at Cal State Fullerton. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

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  • “It was the critics who didn’t take their music seriously. But their music had legs,” says  Rosanne Welch, a lecturer at Cal State Fullerton who has written a book on the 1960s band and its television show. (AP file photo)

    “It was the critics who didn’t take their music seriously. But their music had legs,” says Rosanne Welch, a lecturer at Cal State Fullerton who has written a book on the 1960s band and its television show. (AP file photo)

  • In this 1966 file photo, cast members of the television show “The Monkees,” from top left, Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith, from lower left, Micky Dolenz, and Peter Tork pose next to their Monkeemobile, a customized Pontiac GTO. (AP file photo)

    In this 1966 file photo, cast members of the television show “The Monkees,” from top left, Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith, from lower left, Micky Dolenz, and Peter Tork pose next to their Monkeemobile, a customized Pontiac GTO. (AP file photo)

  • The Monkees were huge teen idols. When Davy Jones got married, it was kept secret to avoid upsetting his fans.

    The Monkees were huge teen idols. When Davy Jones got married, it was kept secret to avoid upsetting his fans.

  • Rosanne Welch met Micky Dolenz in 1986. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

    Rosanne Welch met Micky Dolenz in 1986. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

  • Rosanne Welch with Peter Tork and Micky Dolenz during their 50th-anniversary tour in 2016 in St. Louis. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

    Rosanne Welch with Peter Tork and Micky Dolenz during their 50th-anniversary tour in 2016 in St. Louis. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

  • This June 4, 1967, photo shows the Monkees with their Emmy at the 19th annual Primetime Emmy Awards. The group members are, from left, Mike Nesmith, Davy Jones, Peter Tork, and Micky Dolenz. (AP file photo)

    This June 4, 1967, photo shows the Monkees with their Emmy at the 19th annual Primetime Emmy Awards. The group members are, from left, Mike Nesmith, Davy Jones, Peter Tork, and Micky Dolenz. (AP file photo)

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She’s a believer.

And after Rosanne Welch spoke recently to a gathering of Cal State Fullerton students and faculty, many of them were left also believing that the Monkees, the 1960s boy band, had a greater impact on television, music and pop culture than they had thought.

Illustrated with slides of the Monkees with Paul McCartney and Janis Joplin, on cereal boxes and in pop culture references long after their heyday, Welch’s talk laid out evidence that the group’s TV show made strong feminist statements and advanced such TV practices as characters addressing the audience, used today on such shows as “Modern Family” and “House of Cards.”

“They influenced so many of today’s modern-day performers and yet people keep forgetting about that,” said Welch.

Welch, a lecturer in the Department of Cinema and Television Arts, wrote the book “Why the Monkees Matter.” She spoke as part of Pollak Library’s Faculty Noon-Time Talks, a series that invited faculty members to share their research.

Welch has written for the shows “Picket Fences,” “Beverly Hills 90210” and “Touched by an Angel.” She has edited “Women in American History” and written “America’s Forgotten Founding Father,” a novel based on the life of Filippo Mazzei, who is credited with the line “All men are created equal.”

But such lofty projects have a hard time competing with Welch’s favorite show when she was 7.

“The Monkees,” which ran from 1966 to 1968 on NBC, focused on the misadventures of a Beatles-like rock band, whose songs highlighted each episode. While the four band members were cast for the show, and did not play their own instruments at first, they all had some degree of musical experience and went on to play, and often write, their own music and record until 1971.

The show won two Emmys its first season — for outstanding comedy and comedy directing.

Welch got interested in the Monkees from a research standpoint when she was asked by Cal State Fullerton to present a class for high schoolers in the GEAR UP summer program, looking critically at a TV show. She chose “The Monkees,” only to discover it was far more innovative than she’d given it credit for as a child.

“In the ’60s, people in the know knew that this was something different and worth paying attention to,” she said.

She wrote a story on the show for a screenwriters magazine, tracking down seven of the original 15 writers, many of whom went on to win Emmys, including Treva Silverman, the first woman who wrote for TV without a male partner.

Then she wrote a book.

Welch set the stage for her CSUF audience by describing what the nation had been watching before “The Monkees” debuted: blander family shows such as “The Lucy Show” and “The Andy Griffith Show,” often in black and white.

Then she detailed what was innovative about “The Monkees”:

It contained social justice messages — something that got the Smothers Brothers canceled — which were overlooked by network executives who considered “The Monkees” a kids show. There were references to the Vietnam War, communism in Southeast Asia and the war on poverty.

“Timothy Leary watched and said it was far deeper than anyone else had given it credit for,” Welch said. The LSD guru wrote: “And woven into the fast-moving psychedelic stream of action were the prophetic, holy, challenging words.”

The song “Randy Scouse Git,” written by Micky Dolenz, included the lyrics “Why don’t you hate who I hate/ Kill who I kill to be free?”

“If that’s not a Vietnam War protest song, I don’t know what is,” Welch said. “They got away with singing that on broadcast television, in their hippy-dippy clothes.”

It took a progressive feminist approach. Sure, many episodes were about the four boys meeting girls. But every single girl who dated the boys had a job, Welch said. And in each case, we met her through her job first.

“They weren’t bubbleheads,” she said. “They weren’t waiting around to get married. I think that was an interesting message in 1966.” Never did the boys want a girl only because she was pretty; it was about getting a smart girl, she said.

In one episode, a girl turns down Davy Jones to do her job. Later in that episode, the boys get kidnapped and a girl rescues them, flipping the usual trope. In another episode, the actress Julie Newmar (Catwoman on “Batman”) guest-starred as the owner of a laundromat earning her doctorate (in laundry).

“If you were a girl watching in 1966, you learned that to get a Monkee you didn’t want to be a cheerleader; you wanted to be a woman of value because that’s who they would look at,” Welch said.

It furthered metatextuality, in which there’s a second level of commentary that makes observations on what’s going on.

In particular, the show routinely broke the fourth wall with the audience. George Burns and Jack Benny had done that when they talked to the screen, Welch said, but no show was doing it in the 1960s.

The series would joke about the action, such as superimposing writing on the screen to identify one actor as a friend of the producer. In one episode the quartet shows up at NBC’s offices.

“They’re letting you in on the joke,” Welch said. The younger, hipper audience could think “We’re part of this thing.”

She also pointed out the impact of the band and its TV show on popular culture at the time and since.

“There’s this idea that they weren’t very important and then disappeared,” she said. But a little digging shows they were culturally relevant then and still are.

  • They were friends with the Beatles, she noted. John Lennon would go to Dolenz’s house and jam.
  • Peter Tork was at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, where he was asked to go onstage during the Grateful Dead’s set and quiet the crowd. And the crowd listened to him. (Tork had played with Stephen Stills in Greenwich Village before Stills auditioned for “The Monkees,” was rejected and recommended Tork.)
  • Shows including “Breaking Bad” and “Mad Men” have used Monkees songs, introducing them to a new generation, as have covers of Monkees songs, including Smash Mouth’s version of “I’m a Believer” on the “Shrek” soundtrack.
  • Rachel Maddow interviewed Tork in 2012, after the death of Davy Jones, and gushed over how much she loved “The Monkees” and learned about the 1960s from watching its reruns on MTV.
  • The Monkees’ 12th album, “Good Times!”, released for the group’s 50th anniversary in 2016 was ranked by Rolling Stone magazine among its top 50 albums of the year.

“Suddenly it’s cool to like the Monkees now,” Welch said.

Welch met Dolenz in 1986 after a concert in Cleveland. She still has his phone number from an earlier phone interview, though it no longer works. Dolenz was her favorite Monkee, she said.

“My theory was there’s more girls in line for Davy, so I’d have better luck with the guy with the shorter line.”

Editor’s note: In the interest of journalistic transparency, this reporter acknowledges having constructed, in 1967, a Monkees fort in her closet, where she could daydream about Davy Jones.

 

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A sea of rubber duckies go surfing at Huntington Beach Pier in a yearly ritual

It’s not often you see thousands of ducks paddling about the Pacific Ocean in Huntington Beach – once a year, to be exact.

  • Over a thousand of rubber duckies are dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Over a thousand of rubber duckies are dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Over a thousand of rubber duckies are dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Over a thousand of rubber duckies are dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

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  • Zoe Duncan, 11, looks at the rubber duckies along with her family after over a thousand of duckies were dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Zoe Duncan, 11, looks at the rubber duckies along with her family after over a thousand of duckies were dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Surfers are seen as rubber duckies drift by after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Surfers are seen as rubber duckies drift by after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • A boy helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    A boy helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Hundreds of people race to the beach to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Hundreds of people race to the beach to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Hundreds of people race to the beach to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Hundreds of people race to the beach to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Volunteer Maria Delacruz, from Concordia University Irvine, carries a basket of duckies while people fill them up as more than a thousand  rubber duckies were dumped at the beach off the Huntington Beach Pier as a race fundraiser Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Volunteer Maria Delacruz, from Concordia University Irvine, carries a basket of duckies while people fill them up as more than a thousand rubber duckies were dumped at the beach off the Huntington Beach Pier as a race fundraiser Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • A boy helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    A boy helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Several people help collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical &  Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Several people help collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Volunteer Maria Delacruz, from Concordia University Irvine, carries a basket to collect duckies along with other volunteers as more than a thousand rubber duckies were dumped at the beach as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical &  Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Volunteer Maria Delacruz, from Concordia University Irvine, carries a basket to collect duckies along with other volunteers as more than a thousand rubber duckies were dumped at the beach as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Kylee Condon helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical &  Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Kylee Condon helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Several people help collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Several people help collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Volunteer Diane Santos, from Concordia University Irvine, dumps a basket of rubber duckies in a truck as they were collected from the beach after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Volunteer Diane Santos, from Concordia University Irvine, dumps a basket of rubber duckies in a truck as they were collected from the beach after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

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On Saturday, May 19, some 4,000 cute little rubber duckies were released off the Huntington Beach Pier to surf back to shore as fans cheered them on.

The annual ritual benefits AltaMed Medical & Dental Group-Huntington Beach, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need.

First yellow bird back won $1,000 for its sponsor – 100 times its price.

Although fewer in number, a sea of ducks will be out again Sunday, May 20, at 1 p.m. when ducks purchased by businesses compete for prizes.

The three-day Duck-a-Thon includes an art festival, games and kid-friendly attractions such as a rock-climbing wall.

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Cal State Fullerton men’s team wins Big West track title, two women are individual champs

The Cal State Fullerton men’s track and field team won the Big West Championship for the second straight year and for the second time in program history on Saturday at Cal State Northridge.

The men’s team scored 154 points to win the title over Long Beach State, which was second with 136.5 points. UC Davis had 121 points in third place.

The Cal State Fullerton women’s squad took fourth place with 98 points, three points behind CSUN,  which had 101 points in third place. Long Beach State won the title with 122 points while UC Santa Barbara had 120 in second place.

“I’m very, very proud of our group,” Cal State Fullerton head coach John Elders said. “Both the men and women competed really hard and put it all out there. We came together as a team really well and supported one another. I think the fruits of that is that we were able to put together this kind of performance.”

 

  • Rasaun House competes in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

    Rasaun House competes in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Thaddeus Smith, shown competing in March.
Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

    Cal State Fullerton’s Thaddeus Smith, shown competing in March.
    Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

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  • Cal State Fullerton’s Mason Guzman-Sanchez, shown during competition in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

    Cal State Fullerton’s Mason Guzman-Sanchez, shown during competition in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Nicole Clark. Photo courtesy John Fajardo/Big West Conference

    Cal State Fullerton’s Nicole Clark. Photo courtesy John Fajardo/Big West Conference

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Samantha Huerta, shown competing in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

    Cal State Fullerton’s Samantha Huerta, shown competing in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

  • Coach John Elders. File photo

    Coach John Elders. File photo

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Here are some of the highlights for CSUF:

–With a season-best time of 40.20, the quartet of Luis Matos, Thaddeus Smith, Rasaun House and Marcel Espinoza took first place in the men’s 4×100-meter relay.

–Samantha Huerta won the women’s 800-meter title with a time of 2:07.63, just off her school-record mark of 2:07.36. She is the first Titan in school history to win a conference title in the event.

–Mason Guzman-Sanchez became the first Titan since Damion Jackson in 2000 to win the Big West Championship in the men’s 110-meter hurdles. He clocked a time of 14.23 to narrowly defeat Joshua Turner of CSUN (14.24)

–Smith won the 100-meter dash with a time of 10.46 (+0.7 wind).

–Nicole Clark on Friday — the first day of the two-day event — became the first Titan to ever win a conference title in the women’s javelin with a toss of 151-2 (46.08m).

Also, this week, Elders was named Big West Men’s Coach of the Year while House was named Men’s Freshman of the year.

 

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Three Cal State Fullerton tennis players claim Big West All-Conference honors

Cal State Fullerton women’s tennis claimed three Big West All-Conference honors last week with standout Genevieve Zeidan named as Freshman of the Year.

Zeidan made history as the first Cal State Fullerton recipient of Freshman of the Year honors.  The native of Taipei, Taiwan, was instrumental in helping the Titans to program firsts – a trip to the Big West Tournament finals and a 20-win season.

Zeidan played between No. 1 and No. 2 singles, amassing a 20-6 dual match record. She finished 8-3 against Big West opponents, counting regular season and tournament matches, and helped the Titans achieve the No. 3 seed in the conference tournament, which tied a program record.

Along with claiming Freshman of the Year, Zeidan also earned a spot on the First Team for Singles play. Karla Portalatin and Sarah Nuno joined Zeidan among those honored on the First-Team Singles.

Cal State Fullerton's  Karla Portalatin hits a return shot during her game against Cal State Northridge on Feb. 16.   (Bill Alkofer, contributing photographer)
Cal State Fullerton’s Karla Portalatin hits a return shot during her game against Cal State Northridge on Feb. 16. (Bill Alkofer, contributing photographer)

Portalatin played a large role in the program’s historic year, finishing singles play with a record of 25-7.

Nuno also played a big role in this season’s advancements, finishing the season 26-9.

The duo of Portalatin and Nuno also nabbed an honor together finding a spot on the First Team for doubles play.

Nuno and Portalatin took reign on doubles court number one going 26-6 overall.

Cal State Fullerton finished its historic season 20-6 (6-2 in conference). The 2017-18 campaign is the winningest season in program history.

Sarah Nuno competes at the Big West Conference tennis championship tournament last month. Photo courtesy Josh Barber/Cal State Fullerton Athletics
Sarah Nuno competes at the Big West Conference tennis championship tournament last month.<br />Photo courtesy Josh Barber/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

–Source: Cal State Fullerton

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What does it mean to be Vietnamese in California? Cal State Fullerton experts share insights

  • Cathy Wang of San Gabriel, left, sells jewelry to Leon Nguyen of Garden Grove and his family at the second annual night market at the Asian Garden Mall in Westminster on opening night in 2012. (File photo By Ana Venegas, Orange County Register/SCNG)

    Cathy Wang of San Gabriel, left, sells jewelry to Leon Nguyen of Garden Grove and his family at the second annual night market at the Asian Garden Mall in Westminster on opening night in 2012. (File photo By Ana Venegas, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Thousands of people line the parade route to celebrate Lunar New Year during the Tet Parade in Westminster on Feb. 17. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

    Thousands of people line the parade route to celebrate Lunar New Year during the Tet Parade in Westminster on Feb. 17. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

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  • A convoy flying the flag of the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) before 1975 celebrates the Lunar New Year during the Tet Parade in Westminster on Feb. 17. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

    A convoy flying the flag of the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) before 1975 celebrates the Lunar New Year during the Tet Parade in Westminster on Feb. 17. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Members of a Vietnamese Harley-Davidson owners club ride in the Tet Parade in Westminster on Feb. 17, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

    Members of a Vietnamese Harley-Davidson owners club ride in the Tet Parade in Westminster on Feb. 17, 2018. (Photo by Michael Fernandez, Contributing Photographer)

  • President Gerald Ford sits on a bus with one of the first children evacuated from Vietnam during Operation Babylift at San Francisco International Airport on April 5, 1975. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Bettmann/Corbis via Getty Images)

    President Gerald Ford sits on a bus with one of the first children evacuated from Vietnam during Operation Babylift at San Francisco International Airport on April 5, 1975. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Bettmann/Corbis via Getty Images)

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In case you wondered, the American dream can be found along the 22 Freeway.

For recent Vietnamese immigrants, the American dream is the California dream and, specifically, the Little Saigon dream, said a Cal State Fullerton faculty member who took part in a panel on “Vietnamese California” earlier this semester.

Sarah Grant, assistant professor of anthropology, told the audience about a woman who emigrated from Vietnam, expecting to live in Orange County’s Little Saigon community — centered in Garden Grove and Westminster — or San Jose, as her friends did, but ended up in rural Louisiana.

“Everything she knew about the U.S. was rooted in an Asian grocery store in Garden Grove or a Vietnamese family household in Westminster or Lunar New Year’s celebration in Garden Grove,” Grant said. “When she shows up not in New Orleans, not in Lafayette, it shattered her dreams a little.”

When the woman came to visit Grant, she wanted to eat every meal in Little Saigon or buy ingredients there to cook for herself. “To her, California was Vietnam,” Grant said. “It was like going home to Saigon for her.”

Grant wrote a story on the woman for Boom California, an online publication whose editor, Jason Sexton, is a Pollak Library faculty fellow at Cal State Fullerton. Boom presented the panel discussion on the CSUF campus and a second one in Westminster, and Sexton moderated.

The events’ goal was to explore the role California plays in Vietnam and the role Vietnam plays in California’s past, present and future.

Phuoc Duong, a Cal State Fullerton lecturer in Asian American studies, has written that “California plays a focal dreamland in the imagination of young adults in Vietnam when it comes to the good life.”

During research in Vietnam, Duong found that young adults seek a better life by winning admission to a university or moving to a Western country. He contrasted that with previous generations of young adults who devoted themselves to socialist revolution at three periods of Vietnam’s history: imperialism, the centralized economy and neoliberal times.

The idea of California becomes its own historical force, said Allison Varzally, professor of history and author of “Children of Reunion: Vietnamese Adoptions and the Politics of Family Migration.”


Allison Varzally, Cal State Fullerton professor of history and author of “Children of Reunion: Vietnamese Adoptions and the Politics of Family Migration.” (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

“It defines their longing,” she said. “California stands in for people’s dreams.”

She pointed to photos of Gerald Ford during Operation Babylift, the mass evacuation of children from South Vietnam after the end of the Vietnam War. The then-president was photographed in San Francisco, holding babies as they arrived by the planeload, to show American compassion.

Vietnamese immigrants in that first wave were scattered around the United States; the idea was that pockets of settlers would hinder assimilation. But they moved where they wanted, so the country ended up with pockets like Little Saigon, an area that contains more Vietnamese than anywhere in the country, with East San Jose a close second.

Grant said it’s hard to not think about the Vietnamese diaspora every day, whether driving from home to campus or while on campus.

“I make all of my classes at least partially about Vietnam,” she told the audience.

Grant, a cultural anthropologist, is especially interested in the U.S. appropriation of Vietnamese food and, in particular, coffee. Vietnam has grown into the second-biggest coffee producer in the world, according to the International Coffee Organization. Grant was so surprised to learn this — and that so many multinational corporations buy so much Vietnamese coffee and yet it remains invisible to consumers — that she decided to do her doctoral project on it.

Sarah Grant, Cal State Fullerton assistant professor of anthropology. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)
Sarah Grant, Cal State Fullerton assistant professor of anthropology. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

“If you’re thinking to yourself, ‘Where do I buy Vietnamese coffee?’ the answer is you’re probably buying it and drinking it all the time,” Grant told the audience. Americans don’t realize what they’re drinking is Vietnamese coffee because most of it is unbranded and unlabeled. But it’s what’s in coffee such as Costco’s Kirkland brand or Folgers or the coffee you get in cafeterias such as those on campus, she said.

“If it doesn’t say it’s 100 percent Colombian, or made in Brazil, or Indonesian or Sumatran, or where it’s produced, chances are it’s Vietnamese or a blend of Vietnamese,” she said. “I think it’s quite interesting that you can buy a $7 cup of cafe sua da (made with sweetened condensed milk) in Silver Lake but no one knows that Vietnam is this massive producer of coffee.”

The growth of the coffee industry is part of an explosion of opportunities that exist today in Saigon and Hanoi that don’t exist in Little Saigon, Grant said. She spots Lunar New Year craft beer menus from Vietnam that she realizes she can’t get in Southern California, for example. This blossoming has created a flow of Vietnamese from the U.S. back to Vietnam, she said.

“There’s a lot of people going to Vietnam to explore cultural opportunities for someone who doesn’t have a six-figure salary,” Grant said. “There’s this whole youth culture of people who’ve spent time in California and are now going back because they can have a different lifestyle than they can have here.” They can get by with a motorbike instead of having to buy a Honda Civic plus insurance, she pointed out.

Knowing English makes it that much easier to make a living in Vietnam, added Grant, who said there’s a budding business in graphic design there. Traveling back and forth between the two countries to take advantage of new possibilities has gotten easier in the past 15 years, she said.

“A lot of people want to move to Hanoi because of colonial architecture and how cool it looks on your Instagram feed.”

 

 

 

 

Read more about What does it mean to be Vietnamese in California? Cal State Fullerton experts share insights This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed. Tustin Shredding Service near me

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Keith Urban creates a memorable Stagecoach moment, strong winds kick up extra dust

It had been eight years since singer-songwriter Keith Urban has headlined an evening at the Stagecoach Country Music Festival and he more than made up for lost time during his set Saturday night at the Empire Polo Club in Indio.

Urban, who just dropped a brand new album, “Graffiti U,” on Friday, mixed a little of the old with the new in front of a rowdy and attentive audience. People were ready to party as he came out straight away with “Somebody Like You,” his hair majestically whipping in the wind as he made his guitar sing.

The Stagecoach crowd were some of the first to hear cuts like “Parallel Line,” “Texas Time” and “Coming Home” in a live setting. After nailing his hit “Long Hot Summer,” Urban, who couldn’t stop smiling, addressed his fans.

“This is exactly what I was hoping for tonight, Stagecoach,” he said. “A full moon, beautiful night, (a lot) of dust everywhere and my wife in the wings.”

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban performs with Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban performs with Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

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  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A woman takes a selfie as she stands on a table as Keith Urban performs on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    A woman takes a selfie as she stands on a table as Keith Urban performs on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A woman reacts after receiving Keith Urban’s guitar during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    A woman reacts after receiving Keith Urban’s guitar during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban performs with Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban performs with Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Fans dance on tables as they watch Keith Urban on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Fans dance on tables as they watch Keith Urban on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban performs with Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban performs with Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban performs with Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban performs with Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Fans dance on tables as they watch Keith Urban on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Fans dance on tables as they watch Keith Urban on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban headlines on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Fans dance on tables as they watch Keith Urban on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif.  Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Fans dance on tables as they watch Keith Urban on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. Urban had special guests Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne appear as well. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Keith Urban performs with Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Keith Urban performs with Dwight Yoakum and the Brothers Osborne on the Mane Stage during the second day of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Saturday April 28, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

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Though “Somewhere in My Car,” “Cop Car,” “Wasted Time” and the encore of “John Cougar, John Deere, John 3:16” were big moments for Urban, he created the ultimate Stagecoach moment when he brought out Brothers Osborne and launched into “Fast As You” by Dwight Yoakam.

Yoakam had just wrapped up his headlining set over on the Palomino Stage a few hours earlier and he wasn’t quite ready to hang up his cowboy hat. Yoakam came out with Urban and Brothers Osborne to finish off the song and the crowd went absolutely bonkers.

When Kacey Musgraves took the stage, the wind was at its peak. Security advised guests to stay away from the speaker and video screen rigs throughout the field as they swayed in the 30-plus mph gusts. However, Musgraves took it like a champ. Currently out promoting her new album, “Golden,” she admitted to the Stagecoach crowd that she fell in love and wrote a bunch of love songs, but in the same breath added “…but don’t worry, I saved some depressing songs for ya.”

She’s such a strong and rightfully celebrated songwriter. From her witty “Mama’s Broken Heart,” which was recorded and released by Miranda Lambert, to her latest country-meets-space-disco cut, “High Horse,” one thing is for sure, Musgraves just likes to have a good time and she’s a force to be reckoned with. She let the audience take the chorus on “Merry Go ‘Round” and busted out a dancey cover of Brooks & Dunn’s “Neon Moon” that bled into “High Horse.”

Brothers Osborne had a rough go at Stagecoach. It’s set was marred with technical issues from the start and though they managed to rock through it, disappointment came out in the form of sarcasm from vocalist T.J. Osborne.

“I promise we’re professionals,” he said. “I promise we’re working with professionals, I don’t know if we are professionals.”

His vocal was far too low, something the folks in the VIP pit let him know early on. Despite the struggle with sound, and later the absence of any sort of spotlight lighting, the guys were great. John Osborne absolutely shreds and even a guitar virtuoso like Urban seemed to be mesmerized as he was sitting stage side along with his wife, Nicole Kidman.

“21 Summer” was a great soundtrack to the sun finally dipping behind the mountains and sounded great as the sun set behind the mountains and “Pushing up Daisies” was another highlight. They closed out strong with an extended jam version of the boot-stomper, “Ain’t My Fault.”

Granger Smith made the most of his turn, keeping things pretty basic at the start and letting the songs do the heavy lifting. The audience sang along to “Backroad Song” and “Gimmie Something” and “Happens Like That.”

Midland, clad in their individually unique fashions reminiscent of pretty much any ‘70s rock band playing an outdoor festival, took over the stage and had some fun with the crowd who were ready to hear the guys’ biggest songs: “Drinkin’ Problem” and “Make A Little.” Their throwback country sound, choreographed moves and outgoing personalities make them instant favorites.

Related: See photos of the country stars and their fans on Saturday

“The wind is blowing, it’s so dramatic right now, it’s like a Western,” vocalist Mark Wystrach said, taking a swig of his beer and a good look out into the crowd, which was pretty filled in by 5 p.m.

It was the band’s biggest performance to date and they didn’t disappoint with their original songs and by busting out a tribute to the late Tom Petty with “American Girl” and closing out their set with Bob Seger’s “Turn the Page.” The set wasn’t flawless; a wind gust knocked over a mic stand and tragically the tequila shot Wystrach was saving to help lube up his vocals in the dry weather was spilled.

But in the end, that’s what made it a perfect Stagecoach performance.

More from Stagecoach 2018:

Read more about Keith Urban creates a memorable Stagecoach moment, strong winds kick up extra dust This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed. Tustin Shredding Service near me

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Stagecoach 2018: See photos of Florida Georgia Line’s headlining set

Only a few years after Florida Georgia Line was the first act on the Mane Stage of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival, the duo rose to headlining status on Friday, April 27, opening night of the 2018 festival.

  • Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

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  • Brian Kelley of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley (right) and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley (right) and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • A guitarist for Florida Georgia Line performs as the band headlines on the Mane Stage to close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Friday April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    A guitarist for Florida Georgia Line performs as the band headlines on the Mane Stage to close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Friday April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Fans watch as Florida Georgia Line headlines on the Mane Stage to close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Friday April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Fans watch as Florida Georgia Line headlines on the Mane Stage to close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Friday April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Fans in the pit sing along with Florida Georgia Line as the band to closes out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Fans in the pit sing along with Florida Georgia Line as the band to closes out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Brian Kelley of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Brian Kelley of Florida Georgia Line close out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival on the Mane Stage Friday night April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Fans listen to Florida Georgia Line on the Mane Stage as the band closes out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Friday April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

    Fans listen to Florida Georgia Line on the Mane Stage as the band closes out the opening night of the Stagecoach Country Music Festival Friday April 27, 2018 in Indio, Calif. (Photo by Will Lester- The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

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Cal State Fullerton provost: Women of grit inspire future educator to reach higher

By Kari Knutson Miller

Cal State Fullerton provost

Earlier this semester, I attended a student/alumni reception on campus. Several questions and statements were posed as part of icebreaker activities. One read: “Name someone who inspired you.”

I would like to respond to that question in the spirit of Women’s History Month and the theme “Reclaiming Our Time.” Specifically, I would like to recognize three women in my history.

Kari Knutson Miller, formerly Cal State Fullerton's dean of University Extended Education, is now university provost. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)
Kari Knutson Miller, who formerly was Cal State Fullerton’s dean of University Extended Education and held other positions, is now university provost. (Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton)

First, my Grandmother Lorraine. She was a farmer’s wife. As a young mother, she contracted polio and spent a year in an iron lung. She got out. She never learned how to drive, but she found a ride, and she took a job.

It was pretty unusual that women in her space and time worked outside of the home. She worked on the assembly line at a turkey farm. When I was young, I did not know that we were poor. That’s because my grandmother worked so that we could all enjoy special things and experiences.

Next, my Grandma Hilda. She married as a teenager. She had 12 children. Her husband died when my father was in middle school. Grandma Hilda raised seven children on her own in a converted one-room school house. She was a tough cookie.

Last, my mother. She also married as a teenager of sorts, about 45 days after graduating from high school. Before she was 30, she was a single mother on welfare with three children. I will not forget her talking about how hard it was when my sisters and I needed to bring treats to school for birthdays and such. To stand in the line at the grocery store, to use her welfare coupons to buy candy and to hear judgment from those in line behind her.

I am not technically a first-generation college graduate as my mother returned to school to complete an undergraduate degree when I was in middle school and a graduate degree when I was in high school. In doing so, much changed in the lives of my sisters and me. Her engagement in learning also inspired my love of the university and its mission.

I am here, in part, due to the examples set by these amazing, strong, caring, tough, smart, loving, persistent, fabulous women. I am also here because my husband, Greg, celebrates strong women.

My mom’s parents were the first in our extended families to graduate from high school. My Grandma Hilda completed fifth grade. Among my great-grandparents, Grandpa Albert achieved the highest level of education by graduating from the sixth grade.

In a note from my mother, she shared: “You represent incredible intergenerational mobility and educational achievement. At the same time, your early life experiences provided you with a background and understanding to better relate to and be aware of both the life experiences of Fullerton students and the life circumstances of other cultures throughout the world.”

When I was appointed provost and vice president for academic affairs, I received emails from colleagues that I knew well and those I did not. Specific emails prompted reflection. They were from women celebrating that a woman had been named provost. I realized it had been some time since this campus had a female vice president for academic affairs. During the administration of former CSUF President Milton A. Gordon, Mary Kay Tetreault held that post for four years in the late 1990s. Interesting, she was also author of a book titled “The Feminist Classroom.”

The posture I assume when honoring my grandmothers and mother is similar to that with which I approach this role knowing what it also means and represents to my colleagues. And for the days that I need it, I can retrieve a drawing that accompanied one of those congratulatory emails. It reminds me that in representation, you may need heart, mind and teeth, or grit, if you like.

Kari Knutson Miller began serving as provost and vice president for academic affairs at Cal State Fullerton in January. Previously she has been dean of University Extended Education and associate vice president of international programs and global engagement, as well as chair and professor of child and adolescent studies. She earned her Ph.D. at Arizona State University. This column was adapted from remarks she made at a campus gathering in March to celebrate Women’s History Month.

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A CSUF alum’s day: Satellite constellation performance analysis

By Susan Herb Best

Contributing columnist

 

A fun memory I have as a physics student at Cal State Fullerton was when a professor demonstrated static electricity with a large Van de Graaff generator. With long, lightweight hair, I will never forget him saying “Oooh, WOW, Medusa” when it was my turn to get charged up. It was a Bill-Nye-the-Science-Guy moment.

I also remember studying with a group of engineering majors in the evenings at the cafeteria. I was the only physics major, but being with the group gave it a nice feel of camaraderie. Just the other day, I had lunch with a member of that group who works at Boeing. We both have aged, but have fond memories of our time at CSUF.

A physics class is also where I met one of my best friends. Leslie Crosby Gillespie and I arrived at the classroom one day to find that the professor was not on campus. We looked at each other and both said, “well . . . I guess we could go to the pub.” We became such good friends. I lived at her mother’s house for a short time. Her sister even cared for my infant daughter when I returned to work after she was born. Leslie went on to earn a doctorate in chemistry and returned to CSUF as a faculty member. Sadly, she passed away unexpectedly in 2009, due to a very rare condition.

Susan Herb BestPhoto courtesy of the writer
Susan Herb Best, Photo courtesy of the writer

It is hard to believe it has been 30 years since graduation. In 1987, I earned a bachelor of science degree in physics. The Hubble Telescope and World Wide Web were on the near horizon.

Kurt Bengston, a Rockwell engineer and part-time physics lecturer at CSUF, introduced me to a manager at Rockwell International’s Defense and Space Division in Seal Beach, where I was hired for my first professional job after graduation. CSUF prepared me well for working in the aerospace defense business, and I never regretted my choice of major. I have worked on many challenging programs during my career at Rockwell, Boeing  and Northrop Grumman, thanks to my launch at CSUF.

One of my favorite subjects was optics. My first assignment at Rockwell was to write an alignment procedure for a radar system titled CORA, Coherent Optical Radar Amplifier. It was such a large optical system that we used a theodolite, a tool used for surveying, to perform the alignment of the optics. This alignment procedure was used successfully to install the permanent system at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, for which I received accolades and a promotion.

I find it entertaining that I was less than 10 years old when the 1972 High-Power CO2 Laser Radar program began. (The lab’s “60 Innovations Over Sixty Years” includes its really cool history on Page 19.) Working on programs that enhance our scientific knowledge and advance technology development provides the added incentive of “this hasn’t been done before.”

After working for several years, I returned to CSUF to take night classes to earn a Certificate in C programming, taking advantage of CSUF’s University Extended Education offerings. Around 1994, I had the opportunity to work with a senior physicist, an Oxford Ph.D. brainiac. We were working on a project that simulated images of space-based objects taken from a ground-based telescope. The simulation modeled the distortion that the atmosphere imposed on the images.

My mentor would design the image-processing algorithms to enhance the simulated images. I used my C programming knowledge to code his algorithms. These images obviously varied with time as the satellite traveled in orbit. I then displayed those images in sequence, creating an animation as the satellite passed overhead. This innovation led beyond accolades to additional career opportunities.

After that, I started supporting satellite reconnaissance programs, looking down as opposed to looking up. I was asked to learn to use a tool known at the time as the Satellite Tool Kit and is now called the Systems Tool Kit, created by Analytical Graphics Inc. AGI uses the tagline “Mapping Space and Time.” STK is a critical tool in the industry. The software allows for modeling of anything that moves — satellites, aircraft, etc., as well as stationary objects. It makes it possible to manipulate and define relationships between objects.

I have used one of the STK modules to model rendezvous and proximity operations between satellites. Another module provides the ability to determine things like how many sensors on each satellite have access to any given point on earth over time. This module provides static as well as animated visuals that can help describe the result. My CSUF physics education did not cover the design and performance of satellite systems. It did, however, provide an excellent foundation for learning the basic capabilities of STK. With that, I was able to master advanced satellite constellation performance analyses.

I started using STK in 1996 and have been using it ever since. Around 1999, I went to work for AGI. My job was to demonstrate the tool and train users. I realized it was more fun to use the tool myself than to demonstrate the same things over again. After one year at AGI, I returned to Boeing.

Boeing acquired Rockwell in 1996. Overall, I spent 23 years with Rockwell/Boeing. Three years ago, I joined Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Space Park, Redondo Beach. Space Park was originally TRW, and it is an incredibly awesome campus with some of the most amazing programs. Although my work is on other programs, it is fun to watch progress being made on the James Webb Space Telescope. On a viewing platform, you can look through a window into the clean room, where it is being assembled. The telescope is planned for launch in 2020.

Susan Herb Best, CSUF Class of 1987, gets a warm greeting from one of her former professors, Roger Nanes, professor emeritus of physics, at a recent reunion of physics alumni and faculty of Cal State Fullerton.Photo courtesy Susan Herb Best
Susan Herb Best, CSUF Class of 1987, gets a warm greeting from one of her former professors, Roger Nanes, professor emeritus of physics, at a recent reunion of physics alumni and faculty of Cal State Fullerton. Photo courtesy of Cal State Fullerton.

Beyond what I regard as a wonderful career, I have two even more wonderful daughters. During my tenure with various aerospace companies, I continued to work after my girls were born. When they were young, I worked part time. This afforded me the ability to sit with them during breakfast, take them to day care leisurely, pick them up and even go to Disneyland after school!

Most people didn’t even know I was working part time. Staying connected to the industry gave me the ability to return full time to my career after my girls got older and didn’t need so much of my dedicated support. I feel my continued employment has demonstrated to my girls that women can have not only careers, but successful STEM careers.

My older daughter earned a B.S. in physics from San Diego State and is pursuing a Ph.D. in data science at Chapman University. She will be interning at the Disney Consumer Product and Interactive Media Division this summer. My younger daughter is finishing her B.S. in mechanical engineering with a minor in German at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in December. She will be returning to a second internship at Tesla in Fremont this summer. I suppose having a physics grad as a husband has helped, as well. How can this proud Titan not be proud of her daughters, too?

Susan Herb Best, who earned her bachelor’s degree in physics at Cal State Fullerton, is a systems engineer at Northrop Grumman, where she practices modeling and simulation using Systems Tool Kit for mission analysis visualization.

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