Coachella 2019: For possible attendees, Kanye West’s Sunday Service is about location, location, location

Kanye West will take the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival attendees to church Easter morning with an exclusive weekend two Sunday Service at the campgrounds near lot 4B.

The performance will be just a few hours after West joined Kid Cudi on the Sahara Tent stage to close out day two of the festival.

If you want to watch West’s service in person, fans will need to get up bright and early to secure a good seat. While the event starts at 9 a.m., the parking lots open and shuttles start running at 6 a.m.

But for those who don’t have a Weekend 2 wristband, or a desire to wake up early, the performance will be featured on the YouTube stream.

The schedule has received mixed reactions from the festival crowd.

“I feel like it is exciting but it is a little bit inconvenient just because it is in the morning,” said Jana Hagekhalil, who is staying in a nearby hotel for the festival. “I used to be a Kanye fan but not so much these days.”

She planned to skip the service.

Meanwhile, on-site campers such as Lorena Lopez will wait until the morning of before making a commitment to see West, who headlined Coachella in 2011.

“The third day is always rough,” Lopez said. “It just depends on how my body feels.”

Unlike those who have to make the extra effort to get back to the festival from their off-site accommodations, the unconventional location could benefit Coachella car campers.

“They are literally performing right next to my campsite,” Adrian Gulpane said on Friday afternoon. “I heard the sound check and they’re going to play a lot of good stuff.”

Gulpane believes that West could still add preaching to his performance despite what he heard during the soundcheck.

Long before West made the announcement about his regular faith-based concert coming to Coachella on social media a few weeks ago, there had been speculation that he would be one of the headliners for the 2019 festival.

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Dueling use-of-force bills spur heated Capitol debate

Community activists packed the state Capitol on Tuesday as an Assembly committee mulled a controversial measure that would require police officers to conform to a stricter standard before using deadly force.

Assembly Bill 392 by Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego, is one of two high-profile police use-of-force bills making its way through the Legislature.

Police and activists don’t agree on much, except that the issue has become highly emotional and is in need of legislative action. Police organizations argue that AB392’s changes could endanger officers as they make split-second decisions. Reformers say that too many Californians — especially African-American and Latino men and mentally disabled people — have been unnecessarily killed by officers in recent years.

It is a life-and-death issue that hasn’t been reviewed for eons. In fact, California’s lethal-force law dates back to 1872. The Assembly Public Safety Committee ultimately voted 5-2 to approve the Weber bill, but it faces a rocky road given the opposition from some of the most powerful political forces in the state. Indeed, a couple of lawmakers supported the bill not because they necessarily agree with its content, but because they want to keep the conversation alive.

Specifically, the Weber bill “Limits the use of deadly force by a peace officer to those situations where it is necessary to defend against a threat of imminent serious bodily injury or death to the officer or to another person,” according to the Assembly analysis. It’s the same bill she introduced last year, but it has garnered more momentum this year after police shot to death a Sacramento man whose cellphone they mistook for a gun.

The alternative law enforcement-backed measure is Senate Bill 230, which would leave the use-of-force standard the same, but would require local agencies to adopt new policies. It also calls on a state agency to establish new standards and guidelines. The bill includes some attorney general-recommended reforms, but is the epitome of a “do little” bill, given that it punts on the toughest issues, mainly calls for more training and gives agencies a pretext to ask for more taxpayer money to do what they already should be doing: training officers to de-escalate situations and deal with difficult encounters.

Under current law, police officers may use deadly force if it is deemed to be “reasonable.” In reality, officers almost always say they feared for their life and that using their weapon was reasonable under the circumstances. That’s often true, but not always. District attorneys are reluctant to press charges given the broad nature of the standard. Even when video footage reveals a troubling decision by the officer, that decision usually is deemed “reasonable.” Changing that standard to “necessary” would be a substantive change.

Police have to make quick decisions, but so do members of the public in some police interactions. “They can be in the right place, they can say the right thing, they can have the right attitude when approached by an officer, and still find themselves in situations that take their lives,” Weber said.

We’re not sure her bill is the ideal approach, but its specific and substantive proposals are far more likely to keep a real and necessary conversation going than a superficial alternative designed mainly to give nervous legislators political cover.

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New bill would allow DACA holders paid jobs in Congress

Immigrant youth without permanent legal status would get a shot at paid work in Congress under a bill scheduled to be introduced Wednesday, April 3.

Sen. Kamala Harris, (D-California,) and two other senators are introducing the “American Dream Employment Act,” which would amend current law to allow DACA recipients paid internships and other employment in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate.

Current law allows paid employment in Congress to people who are citizens or lawful permanent residents who are on their way to becoming citizens. That bars people who have a temporary work permit under DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a controversial program created by President Obama and at risk of being dismantled under the Trump administration.

DACA holders are younger immigrants brought to the country illegally as children who have two-year renewable deferments from deportation. The DACA status comes with a social security number and a work permit but no direct path to citizenship.

“The giant sign outside my office says ‘DREAMers Welcome Here’ because we know and value the contributions that these young people have made to their communities. But right now, those same young people are banned from giving back to their country by working for Congress. That has to change,” Harris said in a news release.

“Government works best when it reflects the people it represents. Our nation’s DREAMers are some of our best and brightest, and it’s time they had the opportunity to get a job or paid internship on Capitol Hil,” she said.

(DACA holders and other younger immigrants are called “Dreamers” based on a proposed federal law called the Dream Act that was never passed.)

The proposed bill from Senators Harris, Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nevada,) and Dick Durbin (D-Illinois,) is similar to one introduced by Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick (D-Arizona,) in the House, where it has 57 bipartisan co-sponsors. Co-sponsors of Kirkpatrick’s bill include Rep. Luis Correa, D-Santa Ana, and Rep. Gil Cisneros, (D-Yorba Linda).

The legislation is supported by various pro-immigrant rights organizations, including United We Dream, the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles, (CHIRLA,) and the Los Angeles-based National Immigration Law Center.

Please check back later for more on this story

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University boys seeded second to Harvard-Westlake for All-American tennis tournament

University and Harvard-Westlake are ranked first-second, respectively, in the latest CIF-SS Division 1 boys tennis poll.

But entering this weekend’s 20th National High School Tennis All-American Tournament, they flipped spots.

Harvard-Westlake is seeded first while University is second for the prestigious 16-team tournament, which runs Friday and Saturday in Orange County.

University edged Harvard-Westlake 9-9 on games about a month ago but the Wolverines are the reigning CIF-SS Division 1 champion

The tournament begins Friday at 8:30 a.m. at University and Corona del Mar and progresses toward Saturday’s 3:30 p.m. final at Palisades Tennis Club in Newport Beach.

University opens by playing host to Brophy Jesuit Prep of Phoenix, Ariz. at 8:30 a.m. Friday.

Corona del Mar, the only other county team in the field, plays host to Gilman of Maryland in another 8:30 a.m. start on Friday.

Torrey Pines and defending champion Menlo are seeded third, fourth respectively. Division 1 contender Peninsula and Palos Verdes also are part of the field.

 

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Video: Anaheim stays positive after falling in SoCal Division V final

Check out the highlights and postgame comments from Anaheim’s game at Ramona in the CIF Southern California Regional Division V championship game Tuesday night in Riverside. Video by Dan Albano, Orange County Register

 

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We must see homeless people as human beings: Letters

Re “Pushing hard to change public perception” (Nov. 11):

Regarding this article about whether or not the hearts and mind of people could be changed in order to support housing homeless people, I strongly believe that they can be changed.

In my hometown of Anaheim, I have seen an increase in homeless people, especially after the closing of the riverbed. The homeless had to find new places to live and most relocated to nearby parks like Boysen Park.

I believe that a homeless person has not chosen to be in that situation, but there are so many other factors that make it difficult to find affordable housing. I believe we can change the mind of society by informing them and educating them on the issue.

I have dealt with the homeless on several occasions and they are human beings just like the rest of us. They are looking for an opportunity and a way to change their lives just like we all do.

There should be information meetings that offer more information about homelessness and what we can do as a society to help and not see the homeless as a problem or burden.

Also, having classes in both English and Spanish will help get the message out clearer and make people informed.

— Ruby Felix, Anaheim

Thank you for defending judicial independence

Re “Chief justice, Trump spar in rare scrap over judges” (Nov. 22):

Thank you, Chief Justice John Roberts. For the longest time I have felt that too many judges seem to go well beyond interpreting the law to creating or amending it for ideological purposes.

To discover that it is not so is a great source of relief to myself and many others.

— Tony Wolcott, Newport Beach

Gavin Newsom’s tweet

People, get ready. Our new entitlement Governor-elect Gavin Newsom is just warming up with this tweet about the southern border invasion:

“These children are barefoot. In diapers. Choking on tear gas. Women and children who left their lives behind — seeking peace and asylum — were met with violence and fear. That’s not my America. We’re a land of refuge. Of hope. Of freedom.”

How many of these lawbreakers is Newsom putting up at his home? It’s going to come from your wallet, not his or his elitist backers’.

— Arnold Gregg, Anaheim Hills

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Cal State Fullerton expert finds the Monkees were a steppin’ stone to cultural change

  • Rosanne Welch, Cal State Fullerton lecturer in cinema and television arts, is the author of a book on the Monkees.

    Rosanne Welch, Cal State Fullerton lecturer in cinema and television arts, is the author of a book on the Monkees.

  • Rosanne Welch is a lecturer in cinema and television arts at Cal State Fullerton. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

    Rosanne Welch is a lecturer in cinema and television arts at Cal State Fullerton. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

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  • “It was the critics who didn’t take their music seriously. But their music had legs,” says  Rosanne Welch, a lecturer at Cal State Fullerton who has written a book on the 1960s band and its television show. (AP file photo)

    “It was the critics who didn’t take their music seriously. But their music had legs,” says Rosanne Welch, a lecturer at Cal State Fullerton who has written a book on the 1960s band and its television show. (AP file photo)

  • In this 1966 file photo, cast members of the television show “The Monkees,” from top left, Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith, from lower left, Micky Dolenz, and Peter Tork pose next to their Monkeemobile, a customized Pontiac GTO. (AP file photo)

    In this 1966 file photo, cast members of the television show “The Monkees,” from top left, Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith, from lower left, Micky Dolenz, and Peter Tork pose next to their Monkeemobile, a customized Pontiac GTO. (AP file photo)

  • The Monkees were huge teen idols. When Davy Jones got married, it was kept secret to avoid upsetting his fans.

    The Monkees were huge teen idols. When Davy Jones got married, it was kept secret to avoid upsetting his fans.

  • Rosanne Welch met Micky Dolenz in 1986. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

    Rosanne Welch met Micky Dolenz in 1986. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

  • Rosanne Welch with Peter Tork and Micky Dolenz during their 50th-anniversary tour in 2016 in St. Louis. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

    Rosanne Welch with Peter Tork and Micky Dolenz during their 50th-anniversary tour in 2016 in St. Louis. (Photo courtesy of Rosanne Welch)

  • This June 4, 1967, photo shows the Monkees with their Emmy at the 19th annual Primetime Emmy Awards. The group members are, from left, Mike Nesmith, Davy Jones, Peter Tork, and Micky Dolenz. (AP file photo)

    This June 4, 1967, photo shows the Monkees with their Emmy at the 19th annual Primetime Emmy Awards. The group members are, from left, Mike Nesmith, Davy Jones, Peter Tork, and Micky Dolenz. (AP file photo)

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She’s a believer.

And after Rosanne Welch spoke recently to a gathering of Cal State Fullerton students and faculty, many of them were left also believing that the Monkees, the 1960s boy band, had a greater impact on television, music and pop culture than they had thought.

Illustrated with slides of the Monkees with Paul McCartney and Janis Joplin, on cereal boxes and in pop culture references long after their heyday, Welch’s talk laid out evidence that the group’s TV show made strong feminist statements and advanced such TV practices as characters addressing the audience, used today on such shows as “Modern Family” and “House of Cards.”

“They influenced so many of today’s modern-day performers and yet people keep forgetting about that,” said Welch.

Welch, a lecturer in the Department of Cinema and Television Arts, wrote the book “Why the Monkees Matter.” She spoke as part of Pollak Library’s Faculty Noon-Time Talks, a series that invited faculty members to share their research.

Welch has written for the shows “Picket Fences,” “Beverly Hills 90210” and “Touched by an Angel.” She has edited “Women in American History” and written “America’s Forgotten Founding Father,” a novel based on the life of Filippo Mazzei, who is credited with the line “All men are created equal.”

But such lofty projects have a hard time competing with Welch’s favorite show when she was 7.

“The Monkees,” which ran from 1966 to 1968 on NBC, focused on the misadventures of a Beatles-like rock band, whose songs highlighted each episode. While the four band members were cast for the show, and did not play their own instruments at first, they all had some degree of musical experience and went on to play, and often write, their own music and record until 1971.

The show won two Emmys its first season — for outstanding comedy and comedy directing.

Welch got interested in the Monkees from a research standpoint when she was asked by Cal State Fullerton to present a class for high schoolers in the GEAR UP summer program, looking critically at a TV show. She chose “The Monkees,” only to discover it was far more innovative than she’d given it credit for as a child.

“In the ’60s, people in the know knew that this was something different and worth paying attention to,” she said.

She wrote a story on the show for a screenwriters magazine, tracking down seven of the original 15 writers, many of whom went on to win Emmys, including Treva Silverman, the first woman who wrote for TV without a male partner.

Then she wrote a book.

Welch set the stage for her CSUF audience by describing what the nation had been watching before “The Monkees” debuted: blander family shows such as “The Lucy Show” and “The Andy Griffith Show,” often in black and white.

Then she detailed what was innovative about “The Monkees”:

It contained social justice messages — something that got the Smothers Brothers canceled — which were overlooked by network executives who considered “The Monkees” a kids show. There were references to the Vietnam War, communism in Southeast Asia and the war on poverty.

“Timothy Leary watched and said it was far deeper than anyone else had given it credit for,” Welch said. The LSD guru wrote: “And woven into the fast-moving psychedelic stream of action were the prophetic, holy, challenging words.”

The song “Randy Scouse Git,” written by Micky Dolenz, included the lyrics “Why don’t you hate who I hate/ Kill who I kill to be free?”

“If that’s not a Vietnam War protest song, I don’t know what is,” Welch said. “They got away with singing that on broadcast television, in their hippy-dippy clothes.”

It took a progressive feminist approach. Sure, many episodes were about the four boys meeting girls. But every single girl who dated the boys had a job, Welch said. And in each case, we met her through her job first.

“They weren’t bubbleheads,” she said. “They weren’t waiting around to get married. I think that was an interesting message in 1966.” Never did the boys want a girl only because she was pretty; it was about getting a smart girl, she said.

In one episode, a girl turns down Davy Jones to do her job. Later in that episode, the boys get kidnapped and a girl rescues them, flipping the usual trope. In another episode, the actress Julie Newmar (Catwoman on “Batman”) guest-starred as the owner of a laundromat earning her doctorate (in laundry).

“If you were a girl watching in 1966, you learned that to get a Monkee you didn’t want to be a cheerleader; you wanted to be a woman of value because that’s who they would look at,” Welch said.

It furthered metatextuality, in which there’s a second level of commentary that makes observations on what’s going on.

In particular, the show routinely broke the fourth wall with the audience. George Burns and Jack Benny had done that when they talked to the screen, Welch said, but no show was doing it in the 1960s.

The series would joke about the action, such as superimposing writing on the screen to identify one actor as a friend of the producer. In one episode the quartet shows up at NBC’s offices.

“They’re letting you in on the joke,” Welch said. The younger, hipper audience could think “We’re part of this thing.”

She also pointed out the impact of the band and its TV show on popular culture at the time and since.

“There’s this idea that they weren’t very important and then disappeared,” she said. But a little digging shows they were culturally relevant then and still are.

  • They were friends with the Beatles, she noted. John Lennon would go to Dolenz’s house and jam.
  • Peter Tork was at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, where he was asked to go onstage during the Grateful Dead’s set and quiet the crowd. And the crowd listened to him. (Tork had played with Stephen Stills in Greenwich Village before Stills auditioned for “The Monkees,” was rejected and recommended Tork.)
  • Shows including “Breaking Bad” and “Mad Men” have used Monkees songs, introducing them to a new generation, as have covers of Monkees songs, including Smash Mouth’s version of “I’m a Believer” on the “Shrek” soundtrack.
  • Rachel Maddow interviewed Tork in 2012, after the death of Davy Jones, and gushed over how much she loved “The Monkees” and learned about the 1960s from watching its reruns on MTV.
  • The Monkees’ 12th album, “Good Times!”, released for the group’s 50th anniversary in 2016 was ranked by Rolling Stone magazine among its top 50 albums of the year.

“Suddenly it’s cool to like the Monkees now,” Welch said.

Welch met Dolenz in 1986 after a concert in Cleveland. She still has his phone number from an earlier phone interview, though it no longer works. Dolenz was her favorite Monkee, she said.

“My theory was there’s more girls in line for Davy, so I’d have better luck with the guy with the shorter line.”

Editor’s note: In the interest of journalistic transparency, this reporter acknowledges having constructed, in 1967, a Monkees fort in her closet, where she could daydream about Davy Jones.

 

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A sea of rubber duckies go surfing at Huntington Beach Pier in a yearly ritual

It’s not often you see thousands of ducks paddling about the Pacific Ocean in Huntington Beach – once a year, to be exact.

  • Over a thousand of rubber duckies are dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Over a thousand of rubber duckies are dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Over a thousand of rubber duckies are dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Over a thousand of rubber duckies are dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

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  • Zoe Duncan, 11, looks at the rubber duckies along with her family after over a thousand of duckies were dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Zoe Duncan, 11, looks at the rubber duckies along with her family after over a thousand of duckies were dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Surfers are seen as rubber duckies drift by after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Surfers are seen as rubber duckies drift by after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • A boy helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    A boy helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Hundreds of people help to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Hundreds of people race to the beach to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Hundreds of people race to the beach to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Hundreds of people race to the beach to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Hundreds of people race to the beach to collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Volunteer Maria Delacruz, from Concordia University Irvine, carries a basket of duckies while people fill them up as more than a thousand  rubber duckies were dumped at the beach off the Huntington Beach Pier as a race fundraiser Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Volunteer Maria Delacruz, from Concordia University Irvine, carries a basket of duckies while people fill them up as more than a thousand rubber duckies were dumped at the beach off the Huntington Beach Pier as a race fundraiser Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • A boy helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    A boy helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Several people help collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical &  Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Several people help collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Volunteer Maria Delacruz, from Concordia University Irvine, carries a basket to collect duckies along with other volunteers as more than a thousand rubber duckies were dumped at the beach as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical &  Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Volunteer Maria Delacruz, from Concordia University Irvine, carries a basket to collect duckies along with other volunteers as more than a thousand rubber duckies were dumped at the beach as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Kylee Condon helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical &  Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Kylee Condon helps collect rubber duckies along with hundreds of other people after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Several people help collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Several people help collect rubber duckies after over a thousand were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Volunteer Diane Santos, from Concordia University Irvine, dumps a basket of rubber duckies in a truck as they were collected from the beach after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018.  (Photo by  Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

    Volunteer Diane Santos, from Concordia University Irvine, dumps a basket of rubber duckies in a truck as they were collected from the beach after over a thousand rubber duckies were dumped in the ocean from the pier as a race benefiting AltaMed Medical & Dental Group, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need during The Annual Duck-A-Thon in Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

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On Saturday, May 19, some 4,000 cute little rubber duckies were released off the Huntington Beach Pier to surf back to shore as fans cheered them on.

The annual ritual benefits AltaMed Medical & Dental Group-Huntington Beach, a nonprofit that provides medical and dental care for Orange County’s families in need.

First yellow bird back won $1,000 for its sponsor – 100 times its price.

Although fewer in number, a sea of ducks will be out again Sunday, May 20, at 1 p.m. when ducks purchased by businesses compete for prizes.

The three-day Duck-a-Thon includes an art festival, games and kid-friendly attractions such as a rock-climbing wall.

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Cal State Fullerton men’s team wins Big West track title, two women are individual champs

The Cal State Fullerton men’s track and field team won the Big West Championship for the second straight year and for the second time in program history on Saturday at Cal State Northridge.

The men’s team scored 154 points to win the title over Long Beach State, which was second with 136.5 points. UC Davis had 121 points in third place.

The Cal State Fullerton women’s squad took fourth place with 98 points, three points behind CSUN,  which had 101 points in third place. Long Beach State won the title with 122 points while UC Santa Barbara had 120 in second place.

“I’m very, very proud of our group,” Cal State Fullerton head coach John Elders said. “Both the men and women competed really hard and put it all out there. We came together as a team really well and supported one another. I think the fruits of that is that we were able to put together this kind of performance.”

 

  • Rasaun House competes in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

    Rasaun House competes in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Thaddeus Smith, shown competing in March.
Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

    Cal State Fullerton’s Thaddeus Smith, shown competing in March.
    Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

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  • Cal State Fullerton’s Mason Guzman-Sanchez, shown during competition in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

    Cal State Fullerton’s Mason Guzman-Sanchez, shown during competition in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Nicole Clark. Photo courtesy John Fajardo/Big West Conference

    Cal State Fullerton’s Nicole Clark. Photo courtesy John Fajardo/Big West Conference

  • Cal State Fullerton’s Samantha Huerta, shown competing in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

    Cal State Fullerton’s Samantha Huerta, shown competing in March. Photo courtesy Matt Brown/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

  • Coach John Elders. File photo

    Coach John Elders. File photo

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Here are some of the highlights for CSUF:

–With a season-best time of 40.20, the quartet of Luis Matos, Thaddeus Smith, Rasaun House and Marcel Espinoza took first place in the men’s 4×100-meter relay.

–Samantha Huerta won the women’s 800-meter title with a time of 2:07.63, just off her school-record mark of 2:07.36. She is the first Titan in school history to win a conference title in the event.

–Mason Guzman-Sanchez became the first Titan since Damion Jackson in 2000 to win the Big West Championship in the men’s 110-meter hurdles. He clocked a time of 14.23 to narrowly defeat Joshua Turner of CSUN (14.24)

–Smith won the 100-meter dash with a time of 10.46 (+0.7 wind).

–Nicole Clark on Friday — the first day of the two-day event — became the first Titan to ever win a conference title in the women’s javelin with a toss of 151-2 (46.08m).

Also, this week, Elders was named Big West Men’s Coach of the Year while House was named Men’s Freshman of the year.

 

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Three Cal State Fullerton tennis players claim Big West All-Conference honors

Cal State Fullerton women’s tennis claimed three Big West All-Conference honors last week with standout Genevieve Zeidan named as Freshman of the Year.

Zeidan made history as the first Cal State Fullerton recipient of Freshman of the Year honors.  The native of Taipei, Taiwan, was instrumental in helping the Titans to program firsts – a trip to the Big West Tournament finals and a 20-win season.

Zeidan played between No. 1 and No. 2 singles, amassing a 20-6 dual match record. She finished 8-3 against Big West opponents, counting regular season and tournament matches, and helped the Titans achieve the No. 3 seed in the conference tournament, which tied a program record.

Along with claiming Freshman of the Year, Zeidan also earned a spot on the First Team for Singles play. Karla Portalatin and Sarah Nuno joined Zeidan among those honored on the First-Team Singles.

Cal State Fullerton's  Karla Portalatin hits a return shot during her game against Cal State Northridge on Feb. 16.   (Bill Alkofer, contributing photographer)
Cal State Fullerton’s Karla Portalatin hits a return shot during her game against Cal State Northridge on Feb. 16. (Bill Alkofer, contributing photographer)

Portalatin played a large role in the program’s historic year, finishing singles play with a record of 25-7.

Nuno also played a big role in this season’s advancements, finishing the season 26-9.

The duo of Portalatin and Nuno also nabbed an honor together finding a spot on the First Team for doubles play.

Nuno and Portalatin took reign on doubles court number one going 26-6 overall.

Cal State Fullerton finished its historic season 20-6 (6-2 in conference). The 2017-18 campaign is the winningest season in program history.

Sarah Nuno competes at the Big West Conference tennis championship tournament last month. Photo courtesy Josh Barber/Cal State Fullerton Athletics
Sarah Nuno competes at the Big West Conference tennis championship tournament last month.<br />Photo courtesy Josh Barber/Cal State Fullerton Athletics

–Source: Cal State Fullerton

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