Bring common sense back to California: Doug Ose

Sacramento is broken — fractured by years of mismanagement by career politicians who are detached from the real-life challenges facing everyday Californians.

I was born and raised in California. I’ve raised my family and built my business here. For most of our lives, California was the land of opportunity. That hope has been eclipsed by a rising tide of crises and inept politicians.

The Golden State has more homelessness and poverty than any other state in the country. Housing costs and health care are becoming more costly and difficult to access. Crime is rising, energy costs are spiraling up, and operating a business has become nearly impossible.

These crises are man-made disasters stemming from years of bad policies and poor governance.

Chiefly responsible is Gavin Newsom. His zig-zagging lockdowns and over-regulations have crushed jobs and small businesses, and inflicted long-term harm on our children.

Newsom bowed to unions and delayed fully re-opening schools long after the science and data told us it was safe to open. All the while, his kids received in-person instruction at their private school.

Newsom and his wife partied maskless with elite Sacramento lobbyists at a swanky Napa Valley restaurant, swilling more than $10,000 in wine — while ordering small businesses to close and all of us to shelter in place.

On Newsom’s watch, $31 billion in unemployment benefits vanished into the pockets of thieves, after he ignored four warnings that this would happen.

Now is the time to reclaim the future of this great state for our children’s future.

I’m an independent businessman. I ran for Congress in 1998 on a promise to serve three terms and then go home. And I kept that promise.

Now I am running for governor to fix what is broken in our great state — and then I will go home.

As your governor:

• I’ll make sure our schools are re-opened to full-time, in-person instruction. I will stand with students and parents, not the teachers union, and I’ll institute school choice.

• I will end the reckless policy of releasing thousands of dangerous criminals into our communities.

• I’ll address the homelessness issue by focusing on the mental illness and drug addiction at the heart of this problem. While respecting constitutional rights, we need to be able to compel treatment when necessary.

• I will clear the red tape that’s fueling rising housing costs so supply can meet demand.

• Californians pay roughly 75% more than the rest of the nation for energy that is less reliable. We can lower costs and increase reliability by broadening energy generation and expanding consumer choice.

• I will modernize our water system by increasing surface storage, rationalizing our water delivery system and ensuring our agriculture economy has the water it needs.

I’m running for governor to provide independent, common-sense leadership for the sake of our children and to restore California as the land of opportunity.

Doug Ose previously represented California’s 3rd Congressional District.

Powered by WPeMatico

U.S. edges Qatar on late goal to reach Gold Cup final against Mexico

AUSTIN, Texas — Gyasi Zardes scored in the 86th minute and the United States beat Qatar, 1-0, on Thursday night to reach the final of the CONCACAF Gold Cup.

Zardes, one of the few first-line U.S. players on a mostly junior varsity roster for this tournament, replaced Daryl Dike in the 63rd minute and combined with two other second-half subs, Nicholas Gioacchini and Eryk Williamson.

Gioacchini picked up a Qatari clearance attempt and fed Williamson, who returned the ball. Gioacchini passed to Zardes, and he scored with a right-footed shot from 7 yards, his 14th international goal and second of the tournament.

The 20th-ranked U.S. matched its record with 13 consecutive home wins and advanced to Sunday night’s final in Las Vegas against defending champion Mexico, which beat Canada, 2-1, in Houston.

CONCACAF filled out the field for the Gold Cup, the championship of North and Central America and the Caribbean, with 2022 World Cup host Qatar as an invited guest.

Goalkeeper Matt Turner made three big first-half saves for the U.S.

Qatar had a chance to go ahead in the 61st minute but Hassan Al-Haydos sent a penalty kick over the crossbar following a foul by James Sands. Al-Haydos took a stutter step and tried to fool goalkeeper Matt Turner with a panenka, a soft shot down the middle.

Christian Pulisic, Weston McKennie, Tyler Adams, Zack Steffem, Josh Sargent and other U.S. regulars missed the Gold Cup for vacation followed by preseasons with their European clubs.

U.S. coach Gregg Berhalter started the same lineup in consecutive games for the first time since the 2019 Gold Cup semfinal and final.

The match was played at Q2 Stadium, which opened last month and will host the Americans’ World Cup qualifier against Jamaica on Oct. 7.

The U.S. beat Mexico in their last meeting in a dramatic finish to win the CONCACAF Nations League.

In the other semifinal …

Mexico 2, Canada 1: Orbelin Pineda scored on a penalty shot in first-half stoppage time, his fifth international goal and third of the tournament, and Tajon Buchanan tied the score in the 57th with his first goal. Héctor Herrera scored in the 10th minute of second-half stoppage time, his ninth international goal, for 10th-ranked Mexico.

VAR intervened to hand Mexico a chance from the penalty spot after a review confirmed a foul on Canada’s Donell Henry in the area and Pineda converted to put El Tri in front at the break.

Buchanan drew Canada level early in the second half with an excellent individual effort, picking up a long ball on the left edge of the area, beating his defender and firing past Mexico keeper Alfredo Talavera at the far post.

Mexico again benefitted from a video review, with Canada’s Mark-Anthony Kaye whistled for a foul on the edge of the box after a VAR check, but Maxime Crepeau saved Carlos Salcedo’s penalty shot to preserve the draw.

The match was stopped as the second half progressed because of an anti-gay chant from the Mexico fans, but play resumed shortly after.

Herrera pounced on a ball at the top of the area and fired home in stoppage time to hand Tata Martino’s team a berth in the title game after nearly 13 extra minutes that were at times very tense.

The Canadians were without striker Lucas Cavallini and defender Steven Vitoria due to yellow-card accumulation. They were also without forwards Cyle Larin and Ayo Akinola because of injuries.

Canada was in its first semifinal since 2007 and was seeking its first championship since 2000. The Canadians are the only country other than the U.S. and Mexico to win the tournament.

Read more about U.S. edges Qatar on late goal to reach Gold Cup final against Mexico This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

COVID-19 Updates

City of Rancho Santa Margarita Posted For all health-related information related to the novel coronavirus, or any information related to the County of Orange response to COVID-19, visit the OC Health Care Agency’s website.

Powered by WPeMatico

Hungary hands U.S. women’s water polo team a rare loss

By JAY COHEN AP Sports Writer

TOKYO — Maggie Steffens and the United States have dominated women’s water polo since the country won its first gold medal in the sport at the 2012 London Olympics.

The world is pushing back at the Tokyo Games, and it remains to be seen how Steffens and company respond.

The Americans were handed their first loss at the Olympics since 2008 when they fell, 10-9, to Rebecca Parkes and Hungary in group play on Wednesday. The team had been 19-0 this year, including five victories over Hungary by a combined score of 66-37.

“The game just doesn’t know who you are. The game doesn’t know where you come from,” U.S. goaltender Ashleigh Johnson said. “So every time you need to be ready. As the U.S. team, as the Hungarian team, you need to be ready for each team to bring their best, and Hungary brought their best today.”

The United States was a big favorite to win its third consecutive gold medal coming into Tokyo, but it was pushed hard by China during a rugged 12-7 victory on Monday. Steffens had her nose broken by an inadvertent elbow, and the captain sported a black eye and a small bandage during the match against Hungary.

Even with the loss, the Americans remain in good position to advance to the knockout round. The team faces the Russian team on Friday.

“For us, we’re fortunate that this is just tournament one,” Steffens said. “This is bracket play, and so we’re going to have a lot to work on, a lot to get better if we want to be the team we want to be at the end of this, for sure.”

Hungary trailed, 9-8, with 2:28 left, but captain Rita Keszthelyi scored from deep and Parkes got the game-winner when she connected for a beautiful no-look goal with 45 seconds left. Parkes finished with a team-high three goals.

The U.S. had the ball in the final seconds, but it turned it over.

“It was a huge thing to beat the world champions, but we mustn’t believe that we are better than anyone else,” Hungary goaltender Alda Magyari said through a translator. “We have to take this tournament step by step.”

The 20-year-old Magyari finished with 11 saves, helping Hungary to its first win after it played to a 10-10 tie against Russia in its Tokyo opener.

“We’ve had many tough games with USA in the past and we knew there was always a chance that we could beat them,” said Magyari, who carried her lucky teddy bear around the pool deck after the win. “Today, we’re very happy we managed to do that.”

It was the United States’ first loss since Jan. 16, 2020, at Australia. It dropped to 130-4 since it won gold at the 2016 Games.

It was its first loss at the Olympics since the 2008 final against the Netherlands. It had a draw in London, but it went 6-0 on the way to the title in Rio de Janeiro.

“Wish we would have finished off the game, but we’ll learn from this and move on,” United States coach Adam Krikorian said.

Beyond having some trouble with the physicality of China and Hungary, the U.S. also is struggling with its shooting. It made 25 of 40 shots in its opening victory against Japan, and then shot 36% (12 for 33) against China and 29% (9 for 31) in the loss to Hungary.

“At the end of the day, similar to the China game, we had a really difficult time just putting the ball in the back of the net,” Krikorian said. “I don’t know why that is. I think we’re a little rushed. I think we need to settle down a little bit. A little anxious.”

After Hungary closed out its win, Canada rolled to a 21-1 victory over South Africa. Gurpreet Sohi led the way with four goals.

Powered by WPeMatico

Simone Biles will not defend Olympic all-around gymnastics title

TOKYO

Tokyo—Only minutes into the Olympic Games team final Tuesday, Simone Biles, the greatest gymnast of her generation or any other, lost her special awareness on a vault and stumbled on the landing.

Biles, the four-time Olympic and 19-time World champion, walked to where Team USA had gathered and informed her teammates and coaches she was withdrawing from the competition, citing mental health concerns, knocking these Olympic Games of their already shaky bearings.

Biles rocked the Tokyo Olympics again Wednesday afternoon with the announcement that she will not defend her all around time Thursday and a decision that raises the likelihood that the Games and NBC will lose their biggest star before the most troubled Olympics in 40 years even hit their halfway point.

“After further medical evaluation, Simone Biles has withdrawn from the final individual all-around competition,” USA Gymnastics said in a statement. “We wholeheartedly support Simone’s decision and applaud her bravery in prioritizing her well-being. Her courage shows, yet again, why she is a role model for so many.”

The statement did not address whether will compete in the individual apparatus finals which start Monday. Jade Carey, Biles’ U.S. teammate, will replace her in the all around competition.

Jade Carey, who finished ninth in qualifying, will take Biles’ place in the all-around. Carey initially did not qualify because she was the third-ranking American behind Biles and Sunisa Lee. International Gymnastics Federation rules limit countries to two athletes per event in the finals.

Even before Biles’ most recent announcement the Games were still reeling from her initial withdrawal the night before.

“It’s not really about the scoring, it’s not really about the medals,” Biles said late Tuesday night “I understand some people will say something, but at the end of the day, we are who we are as people.

“I say put mental health first, because if you don’t, then you’re not going to enjoy your sport and you’re not going to succeed as much as you want to. It’s OK sometimes to even sit out the big competitions to focus on yourself because it shows how strong of a competitor and a person that you really are, rather than just battle through it. … Hopefully I’ll get back there and compete a couple more events. We’ll see.”

The first sign of trouble came on Biles’ vault. She planned to do a Yurcenko 2 1/2, but only managed 1 1/2 rotations before stumbling on the landing. She received a 13.766 score, well before her usual marks in an event in which she is the Olympic champion and a two-time Worlds gold medalist.

“I did not choose to do a one-and-a-half,” Biles said laughing. “I tried to do a two-and-a-half, and that just was not clicking. It’s very uncharacteristic of me, and it just sucks that it happened here at the Olympic Games. With the year that it’s been, I’m really not surprised how it played out.

“So it definitely wasn’t my best work.”

Biles said she has increasingly felt pressure from being the face of these Olympic Games. She is also a survivor of sexual abuse by former U.S. Olympic and national team coach Larry Nassar has been a vocal and persistent critic of USA Gymnastics, the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee and FBI’s handling of the Nassar case.

“In the back gym, coming in today, it was like fighting all those demons, ‘I have to put my pride aside, I have to do it for the team,” Biles said. “At the end of the day, I have to do what’s right for me and focus on my mental health, and not jeopardize my health and well-being. …

“I just don’t trust myself as much as I used to. I don’t know if it’s age. I’m a little bit more nervous when I do gymnastics. I feel like I’m also not having as much fun, and I know that this Olympic Games,” she continued starting to weep, “I wanted it to be for myself.

“I was still doing it for other people, so it hurts my heart that doing what I love has been kind of taken away from me to please other people.”

More to come on this story.

Read more about Simone Biles will not defend Olympic all-around gymnastics title This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

Olympic Photos: Team USA continues to find success in Tokyo Monday

Lydia Jacoby salvages Team USA’s day in troubled Olympic waters as the beach volleyball duo of April Ross and Alix Klineman improve to 2-0.

  • April Ross #1 of Team United States returns against Team Spain during the Women’s Preliminary – Pool B beach volleyball on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Shiokaze Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

  • Kolohe Andino of Team United States reacts after his win on day three of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Tsurigasaki Surfing Beach on July 26, 2021 in Ichinomiya, Chiba, Japan. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)

  • Kolohe Andino of Team United States surfs during the men’s Quarter Final on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Tsurigasaki Surfing Beach on July 27, 2021 in Ichinomiya, Chiba, Japan. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)

  • Alix Klineman #2 of Team United States looks on against Team Spain during the Women’s Preliminary – Pool B beach volleyball on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Shiokaze Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

  • April Ross #1 of Team United States enters the court during introductions against Team Spain during the Women’s Preliminary – Pool B beach volleyball on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Shiokaze Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

  • Alix Klineman #2 of Team United States serves against Team Spain during the Women’s Preliminary – Pool B beach volleyball on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Shiokaze Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

  • April Ross #1 of Team United States celebrates against Team Spain during the Women’s Preliminary – Pool B beach volleyball on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Shiokaze Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

  • Alix Klineman #2 of Team United States looks on against Team Spain during the Women’s Preliminary – Pool B beach volleyball on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Shiokaze Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

  • April Ross #1 of Team United States dives in an attempted return against Team Spain during the Women’s Preliminary – Pool B beach volleyball on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Shiokaze Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

  • Kanoa Igarashi of Team Japan completes a huge aerial to find a last minute winning score against Gabriel Medina of Team Brazil during the men’s semi final on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Tsurigasaki Surfing Beach on July 27, 2021 in Ichinomiya, Chiba, Japan. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)

  • Kanoa Igarashi of Team Japan leaves the beach after his win in the mens’s semi final on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Tsurigasaki Surfing Beach on July 27, 2021 in Ichinomiya, Chiba, Japan. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)

  • Kanoa Igarashi of Team Japan surfs during the mens’s semi final on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Tsurigasaki Surfing Beach on July 27, 2021 in Ichinomiya, Chiba, Japan. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)

  • Lydia Jacoby of Team United States competes in the Women’s 100m Breaststroke Final on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Tokyo Aquatics Centre on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

  • Alix Klineman #2 of Team United States looks on prior to a match against Team Spain during the Women’s Preliminary – Pool B beach volleyball on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Shiokaze Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

  • Naomi Osaka of Team Japan plays a forehand during her Women’s Singles Third Round match against Marketa Vondrousova of Team Czech Republic on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Ariake Tennis Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

  • Naomi Osaka of Team Japan serves during her Women’s Singles Third Round match against Marketa Vondrousova of Team Czech Republic on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Ariake Tennis Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

  • Naomi Osaka of Team Japan prepares to serve during her Women’s Singles Third Round match against Marketa Vondrousova of Team Czech Republic on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Ariake Tennis Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)

  • Naomi Osaka of Team Japan prepares to serve during her Women’s Singles Third Round match against Marketa Vondrousova of Team Czech Republic on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Ariake Tennis Park on July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

  • Samuel Mikulak of the United States competes in the high bar event of the men’s team gymnastics in Tokyo on July 26, 2021, at the postponed 2020 Tokyo Olympics. (Chang W. Lee/The New York Times)

  • Gymnasts from the United States, from left, Yul Moldauer, Samuel Mikulak, and Shane Wiskus watch teammate Brody Malone performing on the horizontal bar during the artistic men’s team final at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Monday, July 26, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Ashley Landis)

  • Samuel Mikulak, of the United States, performs on the parallel bars during the artistic men’s team final at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Monday, July 26, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

  • Gymnasts from the United States, from left, Yul Moldauer, Samuel Mikulak, and Shane Wiskus watch teammate Brody Malone performing on the horizontal bar during the artistic men’s team final at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Monday, July 26, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Ashley Landis)

  • Samuel Mikulak, of United States, greets a team member after his routine on the parallel bars during the artistic men’s team final at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Monday, July 26, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

  • April Ross, right, of the United States, and teammate Alix Klimeman wave after winning a women’s beach volleyball match against Spain at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

  • April Ross, right of the United States, and teammate Alix Klimeman react after winning a women’s beach volleyball match against Spain at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

  • April Ross, right of the United States, and teammate Alix Klimeman wave after winning a women’s beach volleyball match against Spain at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

  • Japan’s Kanoa Igarashi goes to the air on a wave during the semifinals of the men’s surfing competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, at Tsurigasaki beach in Ichinomiya, Japan. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

  • Japan’s Kanoa Igarashi goes to the air on a wave during the semifinals of the men’s surfing competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, at Tsurigasaki beach in Ichinomiya, Japan. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

  • Japan’s Kanoa Igarashi goes to the air on a wave during the semifinals of the men’s surfing competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, at Tsurigasaki beach in Ichinomiya, Japan. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

  • Japan’s Kanoa Igarashi, left, shake hands with Kolohe Andino, of the United States, after wining the quarterfinals of the men’s surfing competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, at Tsurigasaki beach in Ichinomiya, Japan. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

  • Kolohe Andino, of the United States, goes to the air during the quarterfinals of the men’s surfing competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, at Tsurigasaki beach in Ichinomiya, Japan. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

  • Kolohe Andino, of the United States, rides a wave during the quarterfinals of the men’s surfing competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, at Tsurigasaki beach in Ichinomiya, Japan. (Olivier Morin/Pool Photo via AP)

  • Lydia Jacoby of the United States waves after winning the final of the women’s 100-meter breaststroke at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

  • Lydia Jacoby of the United States waves after winning the final of the women’s 100-meter breaststroke at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

  • Lydia Jacoby, of the United States, reacts after winning the final of the women’s 100-meter breaststroke at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

  • Gold medalist Lydia Jacoby, centre, of the United States, stands with silver medalist Tatjana Schoenmaker, left, of South Africa, and bronze medalist Lilly King, of the United States, after the final of the women’s 100-meter breaststroke at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

  • Lydia Jacoby of the United States, sees the results after winning the final of the women’s 100-meter breaststroke at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

  • Gold medalist Lydia Jacoby of the United States, left, is embraced by silver medalist Tatjana Schoenmaker of South Africa after winning the final of the women’s 100-meter breaststroke at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

  • Lydia Jacoby, of the United States, poses with the gold medal after winning the final of the women’s 100-meter breaststrokeat the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

  • Naomi Osaka, of Japan, leaves center court after being defeated by Marketa Vondrousova, of the Czech Republic, during the third round of the tennis competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Japan’s Kanoa Igarashi goes to the air on a wave during the semifinals of the men’s surfing competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, at Tsurigasaki beach in Ichinomiya, Japan. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

of

Expand

Read more about Olympic Photos: Team USA continues to find success in Tokyo Monday This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

Padres getting All-Star 2B Frazier from Pirates

An already impressive Padres infield is about to get even better with the addition of All-Star second baseman Adam Frazier.

Pittsburgh has agreed to trade Frazier San Diego for three minor leaguers, a person with knowledge of the deal told The Associated Press on Sunday.

The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the deal had not been announced. The trade is pending physicals. Pittsburgh is sending approximately $1.4 million to the Padres in the deal.

Frazier was the National League starter in the All-Star Game this month. He leads the majors with 125 hits and is batting .324. He’ll join a potent Padres infield that includes Fernando Tatis Jr., Manny Machado and Eric Hosmer.

Pittsburgh is receiving infielder Tucupita Marcano, outfielder Jack Suwinski and right-hander Michell Miliano in the swap.

The Padres are 58-44 and third in the NL West, and hold a cushion for the second wild-card spot. The Pirates have the second-worst record in the NL.

Powered by WPeMatico

Tokyo Olympics TV schedule for Sunday July 25

Here’s the Tokyo Olympics TV schedule for Sunday July 25. Highlights includes skateboarding, swimming and the triathlon.

SUNDAY, JULY 25

CNBC

11 p.m. – 4 a.m. – Men’s Water Polo – U.S. vs. Japan (LIVE) Diving – Women’s Synchronized Springboard Final (LIVE) Archery – Women’s Team Final (LIVE)

5 p.m. – 11 p.m. – Skateboarding – Women’s Street Final (LIVE) Rugby – Men’s Qualifying Round (LIVE) Archery – Men’s Team Elimination Round Skateboarding – Women’s Street Final (LIVE) Fencing – Men’s Individual Foil Round of 32 Men’s Basketball – Argentina vs. Slovenia (LIVE)

NBC

5 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. – Swimming – Qualifying Heats (LIVE) Women’s 3×3 Basketball – U.S. vs. Taiwan (LIVE) Beach Volleyball – Men’s Qualifying Round (LIVE) Men’s Water Polo – U.S. vs. Japan Rowing – Qualifying Heats & Repechages Cycling – Women’s Road Race

9:15 a.m. – 3 p.m. – Canoe Slalom – Qualifying Skateboarding – Men’s Street Final Surfing Day 1 Report Swimming – Qualifying Heats Diving – Women’s Synchronized Springboard Final Men’s Basketball – U.S. vs. France

4 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. – Triathlon – Men’s Final (LIVE) Gymnastics – Women’s Team Competition

6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. – Swimming – Finals (LIVE) Women’s 100m Butterfly Men’s 100m Breaststroke Women’s 400m Freestyle Men’s 4×100 Freestyle Relay Skateboarding – Women’s Street Qualifying

8:30 p.m. – 9:05 p.m. – Skateboarding – Women’s Street Final (LIVE)

9:05 p.m. – 11 p.m. – Skateboarding – Women’s Street Final (LIVE) Men’s Volleyball – U.S. vs. Taiwan

NBCSN

11 p.m. – 1:30 a.m. – Women’s Soccer – U.S. vs. New Zealand 3×3 Basketball

1:30 a.m. – 3:30 a.m. – Men’s Soccer – Brazil vs. Ivory Coast (LIVE)

3:30 a.m. – 5:30 a.m. – Men’s Soccer – Australia vs. Spain (LIVE)

5:30 a.m. – 6 a.m. – Men’s Soccer – Japan vs. Mexico (LIVE)

6 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. – Men’s Water Polo – Serbia vs. Spain Women’s Handball – Norway vs. Korea Table Tennis – Elimination Rounds Badminton – Qualifying Rounds

10:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. – Equestrian – Dressage Table Tennis – Elimination Rounds Men’s Soccer – Japan vs. Mexico Women’s Volleyball – U.S. vs. Argentina

5 p.m. – 11 p.m. – Men’s Water Polo – U.S. vs. Japan Beach Volleyball – Women’s Qualifying Round Women’s Volleyball – U.S. vs. Argentina Men’s Basketball – U.S. vs. France

OLYMPIC CHANNEL

11 p.m. – 4 a.m. – Tennis (LIVE) Men’s Singles, First Round Women’s Singles, First Round Men’s and Women’s Doubles, First Round

4 a.m. – 1 p.m. – Tennis Men’s Singles, First Round Women’s Singles, First Round Men’s and Women’s Doubles, First Round

7 p.m. – 11 p.m. – Tennis (LIVE) Men’s Singles, Second Round Women’s Singles, Second Round Men’s and Women’s Doubles, Second Round

PEACOCK

3 a.m. – 8 a.m. – Women’s Gymnastics Qualifying (LIVE) Men’s Basketball – U.S. vs. France (LIVE)

USA

11 p.m. – 5:20 a.m. – Cycling – Women’s Road Race (LIVE) Women’s 3×3 Basketball – U.S. vs. Romania (LIVE) Beach Volleyball – Men’s Qualifying Round Swimming – Qualifying Heats (LIVE)

5:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. – Archery – Women’s Team Final Canoe Slalom – Qualifying Men’s Soccer – Brazil vs. Ivory Coast Women’s Handball – Spain vs. Sweden Fencing – Women’s Foil & Men’s Epee Finals Judo – Finals Taekwondo – Finals Boxing – Elimination Rounds Weightlifting – Men’s Finals Surfing Report Day 1

2:30 p.m. – 6 p.m. – Triathlon – Men’s Final (LIVE) Women’s Beach Volleyball (LIVE)

6 p.m. – 8 p.m. – Softball – U.S. vs. Japan (LIVE)

8 p.m. – 11 p.m. – 3×3 Basketball (LIVE) Beach Volleyball – Women’s Qualifying Round (LIVE) Rowing – Semifinals Women’s Water Polo – U.S. vs. China (LIVE)

Powered by WPeMatico

Football notes: El Modena flashes talent with runner-up finish at Huntington Beach passing tournament

HUNTINGTON BEACH — Call El Modena High one of the best-coached football teams in Orange County, and the confirmation arrives pretty quickly. Call the Vanguards a “passing team”, and Coach Matt Mitchell will probably laugh.

They do like a physical ground game but the Vanguards’ passing attack was no joking matter at the Surf City passing tournament at Huntington Beach on Saturday, July 24.

El Modena reached its first passing tournament final under Mitchell, its sixth-year coach whose squad fell to Saugus 14-6 in championship game.

The Vanguards finished 2-1 in their pool and then knocked off Charter Oak and Chino Hills in the quarterfinals and semifinals, respectively.

Quarterback Jack Keays, one of only nine seniors on the El Modena squad, led the run by connecting well with junior running back Owen Smith and junior tight end Mayson Hitchens.

Smith produced a highlight, 18-yard touchdown grab against triple coverage on a wheel route. He also recorded a key interception.

Keays’ other top targets were junior wide receivers Sam Astor and Andres Gomez.

“I think that even though we’re a young team and we don’t have a lot of experience, we have some great athletes and we can only get better from here,” said Keays, a three-year starter.

El Modena also won the bench press event during the lineman competition. The Vanguards pumped out 119 reps, including a team-high 31 by junior defensive lineman Esteban Choucair with 185 pounds.

“It was a good day,” Mitchell said. “We beat some good teams at the last second (in the passing tournament).”

The Crsstview League team opens the season against Santa Ana.

OILERS IMPRESSES AGAIN

Huntington Beach followed up its championship at the Chargers’ 11on tournament by reaching the semifinals. The Oilers defeated Tesoro in the quarterfinals.

Senior quarterback AJ Perez showcased a strong and accurate arm while senior Tyler Moses and Hideo Ray were dependable receivers.

Moses also help lead the Oilers on defense. In a 20-12 victory against Foothill in pool play, he had a late pass breakup and interception.

FOOTHILL STACKED WITH TALL RECEIVERS

Foothill senior quarterback Brody Jones has some tall receivers to work with this fall.

Mikey Mazurie, a 6-foot-6 senior, caught two TDs against Huntington Beach. Another target is Aaron Dabalack, a 6-foot-4 senior wide out. And there’s tight end Patrick Hawkins, a 6-foot-5 senior who holds off from Penn, Yale and Columbia among others.

ORANGE FLASHES POTENTIAL

Orange lost to Charter Oak 18-14 in pool play but still showed the makings of a formidable team.

Sophomore Kobe Boykin displayed his athleticism at slot receiver/running back and cornerback. He nearly collected a late interception that would have helped the Panthers.

Boykin holds offers from San Jose State, Arizona, Arizona State, Colorado and Pittsburgh.

Left-handed quarterback Zachary Siskowic, a senior transfer from Crespi, offered a smooth release and plenty of strength with his throws.

And freshman corner Arron White has excellent size at 6-foot-1, 148 pounds. He will only get better from playing tight man coverage at the varsity level.

TUSTIN UPDATE

The Tillers and new QB Tobey Schmidt lost to Downey 27-18 in the quarterfinals of the SGV Shootout.

Read more about Football notes: El Modena flashes talent with runner-up finish at Huntington Beach passing tournament This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

The Latest: Moment of silence held at Tokyo opening ceremony

The Latest on the Tokyo Olympics, which are taking place under heavy restrictions after a year’s delay because of the coronavirus pandemic:

___

Japan’s Emperor Naruhito and International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach have arrived for the opening ceremony of the Tokyo Games.

Naruhito attended the 1964 Tokyo Olympics as a 4-year-old, watching the marathon and equestrian events. Bach won a gold medal in fencing at the 1976 Montreal Games.

They were followed by a delegation chosen to carry the Japanese flag into the stadium, before the host nation’s national anthem was performed by singer Misia.

Tributes were paid to those lost during the pandemic, and the Israeli delegation that was killed at the Munich Games in 1972. A moment of silence was offered inside the stadium.

___

With a blaze of indigo and white fireworks lighting the night sky, the Tokyo Olympics opening ceremony has started.

It began with a single female athlete at the center of the stadium, kneeling. As she stood, the shadow behind her took the shape of a seedling, growing as she walked. A number of athletes were featured in a video that started with the moment Tokyo won the Olympic bid in 2013, then eventually to images of a world silenced by the pandemic.

Then came the fireworks, a 20-second blast of light — as if to say these Olympics have finally emerged from dark times.

___

The International Olympic Committee has released the order of the parade of nations for the opening ceremony and the names of all the flagbearers.

Greece, per Olympic tradition, enters first. The host nation always enters last, so it’ll likely take a couple hours or so before Japanese flagbearers Yui Susaki and Rui Hachimura lead their national contingent into the stadium.

The Refugee Olympic team goes second in the parade. The others are slotted by their order in the Japanese alphabet, so Iceland and Ireland precede Azerbaijan, for example.

The IOC says 206 teams — 205 nations and the refugee team — will be taking part in the opening ceremony. Some nations will have their flags carried by volunteers. Other nations will have only one flagbearer. Most will have two, with one male and one female athlete chosen for the role.

___

The Tokyo 2020 opening ceremony is about to begin, 364 days behind the original schedule and with a very different feel than what was originally intended before the pandemic changed everything.

The Olympic Stadium is largely empty. The Tokyo 2020 souvenir store outside the front gates is closed. But that doesn’t mean fans have stayed away. Hundreds of fans gathered outside the gates and along the sidewalks of closed streets, waving at any person with an Olympic credential or any vehicle that went by with an Olympic logo.

Track and field events will be held in the stadium later in these games. The track itself is covered by a large black tarp for the opening ceremony and the infield is covered with a white tarp, one where graphics will be displayed over the course of the evening.

Some dignitaries and invited guests will be in the stadium seats, including U.S. first lady Jill Biden.

___

Six Polish swimmers have returned home before the Olympics even started, their dreams scuttled by the country mistakenly sending too many athletes to Tokyo.

Only 17 swimmers from Poland qualified for the Tokyo Games. The country’s swimming federation put 23 athletes on the plane to Japan, sparking outrage among those who were denied a chance to compete.

Two-time Olympian Alicja Tchorz was among those sent home. She griped on social media about all the sacrifices she had made to earn another trip to the Summer Games, only for it to result “in a total flop.”

The team sent out a statement demanding the resignation of Polish Swimming Federation president Paweł Słomiński. He issued his own statement expressing “regret, sadness and bitterness” about the athletes’ situation.

Słomiński said there was confusion over the qualifying rules and he was merely trying to “allow as many players and coaches as possible to take part” in the Olympics.

___

A bad weather forecast for Monday in Tokyo has prompted Olympic officials to move scheduled rowing events to Sunday.

Officials say rain, high winds and strong gusts could cause choppy and potentially unrowable conditions at the Sea Forest Waterway in Tokyo Bay.

The change affects men’s and women’s single and double sculls semifinals, and men’s and women’s fours repechage. The opening heats in the men’s and women’s eights also were moved from Sunday to Saturday.

___

Australian swimmer Kaylee McKeown has surprisingly withdrawn from one of her best events because of a busy schedule at the Tokyo Olympics.

McKeown dropped the 200-meter individual medley, where she’s ranked No. 1 in the world and would have been a favorite to win a gold medal. She’ll focus instead on her two backstroke events and the relays.

“You have a rookie coming into the Olympics — it is a new experience and a big call,” Australian coach Rohan Taylor said.

The 200 IM semifinal heats are Monday night and the 100 back final is the next morning. Taylor says the timing “could be a challenge,” so the decision was made to drop the individual medley.

McKeown set a world record in the 100 back last month at the Australian trials, and the 20-year-old swimmer will be a gold medal favorite in that event.

___

The U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee says about 100 of the 613 U.S. athletes descending on Tokyo for the Olympics are unvaccinated.

Medical director Jonathan Finnoff says 567 of the American athletes had filled out their health histories as they prepared for the trip. He estimated 83% had replied they were vaccinated.

Finnoff says 83 percent is a substantial number and and the committee is quite happy with it.

Nationally, 56.3% of Americans have received at least one dose of the vaccine.

The International Olympic Committee estimates that around 85% of residents of the Olympic Village are vaccinated. That’s based that on what each country’s Olympic committee reports but is not an independently verified number.

___

South Korea’s An San has broken the women’s Olympic archery record with a score of 680 in the qualifying round on a hot and humid day.

Her mark topped the score of 673 set by Lina Herasymenko of Ukraine in 1996. An San’s teammates Jang Minhee (677) and Kang Chae Young (675) were second and third.

Russian Olympic Committee archer Svetlana Gomboeva collapsed in the intense heat and was treated by medical staff. The temperature soared above 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit).

In the men’s qualifying round, Kim Je Deok of South Korea posted the top mark of 688, with Brady Ellison of the United States second (682) and Oh Jin Hyek of South Korea third (681).

The Olympic debut of the mixed team event will be Saturday. The women’s individual competition is next Friday and the men’s individual event the following day.

___

About 50 protesters have gathered in Tokyo to demand the cancellation of the Olympics.

The opening ceremony is set for Friday evening local time.

The protesters gathered outside the Tokyo Metropolitan Government building chanting “no to the Olympics” and “save people’s lives.” They held up signs reading “cancel the Olympics.”

The Games, largely without spectators and opposed by much of the host nation, are going ahead a year later than planned.

A day earlier, Tokyo hit another six-month high in new COVID-19 cases as worries grew of worsening infections during the Games. Still, the number of cases and deaths as a share of the population in Japan are much lower than in many other countries.

The opening ceremony will be held mostly without spectators to prevent the spread of coronavirus infections, although some officials, guests and media will attend.

___

Jill Biden has held a virtual meet-and-greet with several U.S. athletes who will compete at the Tokyo Games.

The U.S. first lady is in Tokyo to support the athletes and attend the opening ceremony.

She spoke virtually with Eddy Alvarez, a baseball player and short track speed skater, and basketball player Sue Bird. Both will be flagbearers for the U.S. at the opening ceremony. She also spoke with Allison Schmitt, a four-time Olympic swimmer and mental health advocate.

Biden told the athletes that they’d given up a lot to be in Tokyo and relied on support from family and friends.

On Saturday, she’ll dedicate a room in the residence of the U.S. chief of mission to former U.S. Sen. Daniel Inouye, D-Hawaii, and his wife, Irene Hirano Inouye.

She will host a U.S.-vs.-Mexico softball watch party at the U.S. Embassy for staff and their families, and cheer U.S. athletes competing in several events before leaving Tokyo.

___

South African race walker Lebogang Shange has been banned for four years for doping and will miss the Tokyo Olympics.

The former African champion was entered in the men’s 20-kilometer race on Aug. 5. The Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled on the case in Tokyo.

The 30-year-old Shange tested positive for the anabolic steroid trenbolone and was provisionally suspended in December 2019. His ban will expire before the 2024 Paris Olympics.

___

The Swiss Olympic team says 400-meter hurdler Kariem Hussein has accepted a nine-month ban after testing positive for a banned stimulant.

The 2014 European champion was entered in the event at the Tokyo Games. The heats start next Friday. It is unclear if Hussein will be replaced in the 40-athlete lineup.

The Swiss Olympic body’s tribunal backdated the ban by one week from the time Hussein was provisionally suspended. That suspension had not been disclosed.

___

Tokyo Olympic organizers have reported 25 new COVID-19 cases. Three of them are athletes that were announced on Thursday.

There are 13 athletes among the 110 Olympic-accredited people that have tested positive in Japan since July 1.

Three media workers coming to Japan from abroad were included in the latest update.

___

Naomi Osaka’s opening match in the Olympic tennis tournament has been pushed back from Saturday to Sunday.

Organizers did not immediately provide a reason for the switch. They said only that the move came from the tournament referee.

Osaka was originally scheduled to play 52nd-ranked Zheng Saisai of China in the very first contest of the Games on center court Saturday morning.

One reason for the move could be that Osaka might have a role in the opening ceremony Friday night. That wouldn’t leave her much time to rest before a Saturday morning match.

Osaka is returning to competition for the first time in nearly two months after she withdrew from the French Open following the first round to take a mental health break.

She is one of Japan’s top athletes.

___

The World Anti-Doping Agency says several Russian athletes have been kept away from the Tokyo Olympics because of doping suspicions based on evidence from a Moscow testing laboratory that was shut down in 2015.

WADA director general Olivier Niggli says it intervened with sports bodies to ensure those athletes — “not many, but there was a handful” — were not selected.

The team of 335 Russian athletes accredited for Tokyo is competing without a national flag and anthem as punishment for state tampering with the Moscow lab’s database. The team name is ROC, the acronym for Russian Olympic Committee, without the word “Russia.”

The identity ban for the Tokyo Olympics and 2022 Beijing Winter Games was imposed by the Court of Arbitration for Sport last December.

Giving WADA the database and samples from the lab was key to getting closure for the long-running Russian state-backed doping scandal.

WADA had a list of around 300 athletes under suspicion and gave evidence to Olympic sports bodies for possible disciplinary cases.

Niggli says “we cross-checked what we had from this long list” to ensure athletes were not selected for Tokyo.

___

Russian archer Svetlana Gomboeva lost consciousness during a competition at the Tokyo Olympics in intense heat.

Coach Stanislav Popov says in comments via the Russian Olympic Committee that Gomboeva collapsed shortly after completing the qualifying round Friday.

Popov says “she couldn’t stand it, a whole day in the heat” and adds that humidity made the problem worse. Temperatures in Tokyo were above 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit.)

The heat in Tokyo’s summer months already prompted organizers to move the marathons and race-walking events to the cooler city of Sapporo.

___

U.S. men’s water polo captain Jesse Smith will skip the opening ceremony for the Tokyo Olympics on Friday after the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee limited how many players from his team could participate in the festivities.

Olympic water polo rosters consist of 13 players, and 12 are designated as available for each game. Smith said the team was told by the USOPC that it could have 12 credentialed athletes walk in the ceremony.

“We tried to keep our team together and change it with every constructive outlet, but no success, and now it’s time to refocus on getting game ready,” Smith wrote on Twitter. “So tonight I am sending my team out there to represent (the United States) proudly and soak up every moment. Let’s go boys!”

The 38-year-old Smith is playing in his fifth Olympics, matching Tony Azevedo for most Olympic teams for a U.S. water polo athlete. He was under consideration to serve as the male U.S. flag bearer for the opening ceremony before that honor went to baseball player Eddy Alvarez.

___

A map on the Olympic website has been changed after Ukraine protested that it included a border across the Crimean Peninsula.

The map is part of a “Cheer Zone” feature tracking how fans around the world have backed different teams at the Tokyo Games.

Late Thursday the map had a black line across the top of Crimea in the same style as national borders. On Friday morning, there was no line across the peninsula. Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine in 2014. Ukraine still considers it to be Ukrainian territory.

The Ukrainian embassy in Japan tells the Associated Press in an e-mail that “we have protested to the IOC and the map was corrected.”

___

Road cyclist Michal Schlegel is the fourth Czech athlete from three different sports to test positive before their competition at the Tokyo Games.

Schlegel tested positive at the team’s training base in Izu and will miss Saturday’s road race.

The Czech Olympic Committee said in a statement Friday that Schlegel is in isolation, and that Michael Kukrle and Zdenek Stybar will be its only two riders lining up at Musashinonomori Park for one of the first medal events of the Summer Games.

Czech beach volleyball players Marketa Slukova and Ondrej Perusic and table tennis player Pavel Sirucek also tested positive earlier this week. That has prompted the Czech Olympic team to investigate whether the outbreak is linked to its chartered flight to Tokyo.

Powered by WPeMatico