UCLA upsets Washington State in high-scoring Pac-12 opener

PULLMAN, Wash. – That is one way to end a losing streak.

UCLA roared back from a 32-point deficit in the second half, and Dorian Thompson-Robinson’s 15-yard touchdown pass to Demetric Felton with a minute left lifted the Bruins to a wild 67-63 victory over No. 19 Washington State at Martin Stadium on Saturday.

The game was the Pac-12 Conference opener for both teams, and the outcome did not seem in doubt when WSU built a 49-17 lead in the third quarter. Instead, the Bruins staged a comeback to remember behind an opportunistic offense that capitalized on a bevy of Cougar mistakes over the final two quarters.

Thompson-Robinson completed 25 of 38 passes for 507 yards with five touchdowns and one interception to overcome his counterpart, WSU’s Anthony Gordon, who passed for 570 yards on 41-for-61 passing and a school-record nine touchdowns.

Gordon had one final chance to drive the Cougars down the field, but UCLA’s Keisean Lucier-South forced a fumble on a sack. The fumble was recovered by Bruin linebacker Josh Woods.

Gordon’s seventh touchdown pass – a 6-yard strike to Dezmon Patmon – gave the Cougars a seemingly insurmountable 49-17 lead with just under 7 minutes left in the third quarter. UCLA staged a furious rally behind its quarterback, Dorin Thompson-Robinson, but the Bruins fell short.

Thompson-Robinson ran for a 1-yard touchdown run, fired a 37-yard touchdown pass to receiver Chase Cota, watched Demetric Felton take a reception 94 yards for another touchdown and added a 7-yard scoring pass to Devin Asiasi that cut WSU’s lead to 49-46 just 30 seconds into the fourth quarter.

The teams traded six touchdowns in the final quarter alone. Max Borghi’s 65-yard touchdown reception gave WSU its final lead at 63-60 with 6:11 remaining.

Woods’ interception ended WSU’s opening drive and set up a 14-yard touchdown pass from Dorin Thompson-Robinson to tailback Joshua Kelley for a 7-0 lead less than 2 minutes into the game.

The Cougars (4-0) evened the score at 7-7 when Gordon and Easop Winston Jr. connected for the first of four touchdown passes. UCLA moved ahead 10-7 on its next drive with JJ Molson’s 31-yard field goal.

Winston Jr. hauled down two more touchdowns in the second quarter to propel the Cougars to a 35-17 halftime edge.

Felton broke free for a 100-yard kickoff return for a touchdown midway through the second quarter to trim the deficit to 21-17.

Read more about UCLA upsets Washington State in high-scoring Pac-12 opener This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

When financial choices backfire, you can fix them

Even when we attempt to do our best thinking, our choices can backfire. Nowhere is this as impactful as your financial decisions. In fact, there is a dedicated sector of finance called behavioral finance.

This addresses why so many of us make irrational and systematic errors with money that are void of logic and soundness. It has to do with our cognitive biases. We do what we do, then rationalize it.

Are you wrestling with a facet of your money management that is compromising your financial health? It’s the small stuff that catches you unaware, but it can add up to a lot.

Here are five ways our choices may backfire because of cognitive biases and what to do about it:

1. Mental accounting. If you treat a windfall differently from your regular income, such as an inheritance from a grandparent or a large IRS return, then you’re guilty of mental accounting. This refers to the different values we may place on money based on how we acquire it. For example, a tax return can be seen as an unexpected surplus, when in fact, it’s our money in the first place!

And unfortunately, in many cases people will indulge, feeling that the unexpected doesn’t happen often. Errors such as opening a low interest-bearing account while having high credit card balances is one example. Or purchasing a new car and discovering later on how much it really costs. Treat all money the same. Be sure that if you receive unexpected money that you review your financial goals and consider how this can help you to meet them.

2. Sunk cost fallacy. Throwing good money after bad sums up this bias. The more we spend on something, the less we’re likely to let it go. This pertains to things that no longer serve us. Do you have a storage full of unused purchases from a past life that you feel are too valuable to throw away? Are you suffering from home or garage clutter because of the same?

Sunk cost fallacy says we feel guilty about ridding ourselves of what we feel was a costly purchase but we no longer use. If you no longer use it, give it away. This will save your sanity and your checkbook, especially if you are renting space for these items.

3. Retail therapy. This one is particularly tempting; another way to describe it is impulse shopping. “I work hard; I deserve this,” is a phrase one hears often in conjunction with making a sudden and unpremeditated purchase. The advice many give is to “sleep on it for 24 hours.” But you can do more to get out in front of this dangerous behavior by asking yourself how you’re feeling before you enter a store (or the Amazon website!).

If you’re bored, restless, lonely or experiencing any feeling that leaves you empty, take caution. You are vulnerable to impulse shopping. Instead, once you have identified your emotion, pick a healthier way to deal with it. This will save money and a lot of closet space taken up by shirts you’ll never wear.

4. Loss aversion. Do you panic when the stock market goes down? Do you tend to sell the positions in your portfolio so you don’t “lose it all”? This strategy will minimize the returns that you could otherwise enjoy. Work with a responsible wealth advisor who can guide you.

The advice here is to watch the market less. You aren’t abdicating your responsibility by working with someone who oversees your funds, and you should read your monthly statements and meet regularly with your advisor. However, if you are a market “stalker” and this causes panic, back away slowly and allow your professional to manage the portfolio for you.

5. Sinkhole behavior. Have you made a choice that has backfired leaving you feeling paralyzed and embarrassed? Get past it and take action. Do what you can to remedy or redirect the situation by reaching out for help.

And reach out for the right kind of help. Don’t take advice from a neighbor or someone who tells you they once had the same experience. Get help from the right kind of advisor who can look at your situation and the complete picture. They’re best suited to guide you back into the sunlight.

When a choice you have made with your finances backfires, recognize this as a pivot point to help you reassess your money behaviors so that you can redirect and move forward. Your future will thank you.

Patti Cotton works with executives, business owners, and their companies, to elevate and support leadership at all levels. Her client roster includes privately-owned businesses and such entities as Bank of America, Boeing, Coca-Cola, Harvard University, Sysco, Edward Jones, Morgan Stanley and the Girl Scouts of America.  Patti@PattiCotton.com.

Powered by WPeMatico

Orange County GOP asks embattled Assemblyman Bill Brough to bow out of 2020 election

The Republican Party of Orange County on Monday night called for GOP Assemblyman Bill Brough to bow out of the 2020 race for California’s 73rd Assembly District and retire from office when his current term ends.

Brough, R-Dana Point, is facing allegations of sexual assault and an investigation by state ethics officials over his use of campaign funds. He has repeatedly denied wrongdoing in both cases, accusing the women who’ve filed harassment complaints against him of being motivated by politics.

But in executive session during the OCGOP’s monthly Central Committee Meeting, elected members overwhelmingly voted to approve a resolution opposing Brough’s re-election “based on the totality of the circumstances and allegations surrounding the Assemblyman.”

A source who was present in the closed door meeting tells the Register that only Brough and one or two other members voted against the resolution. When it passed, the source said Brough stormed out of the meeting.

The assemblyman, who’s serving his third representing AD-73, didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment on Monday night’s vote.

It was during the OCGOP’s June meeting that Supervisor Lisa Bartlett first publicly accused Brough of sexually harassing her during an event eight years earlier when the pair were serving on the Dana Point City Council.

Three other women then also came forward to accuse Brough of making unwanted sexual advances in the past, though two of the women chose to remain anonymous out of fear of retaliation. But Brough outed those women in a mass email sent to OCGOP members Aug. 16. In the email, Brough again denied the women’s claims, insisting they were all retaliating against him for action he’s taken to try to control escalating costs for Orange County’s toll road projects.

“One thing I learned over the years is when you kick the beehive the bees come out,” he wrote.

In a joint statement released Monday night, Brough accusers Bartlett, Heather Baez and Jenniffer Rodriguez said they decided to speak out to defend themselves and correct the record.

“Bill Brough’s sexual misconduct and predatorial behavior has already caused each of us great pain and anxiety. As if that was not enough, now he is using his position of power to shame and intimidate us. Unfortunately for Bill, his actions have given us more resolve than ever to stand up against his bullying tactics and tell people the truth about his behavior.”

Baez, who’s been a staffer for state legislators and worked for local government agencies, said she filed a sexual harassment complaint against Brough with the state assembly in 2017. She said Brough has made “repeated and unwanted advances” for years, “including inviting me to drinks, dinners, an overnight hotel stay, and an extremely offensive and non-consensual physical contact.” Baez denies that her accusations are politically motivated, insisting she stayed quiet before because she didn’t want the incidents to interfere with her job.

Rodriguez refuted Brough’s claim in his mass email to OCGOP members that he only met her “once in 2015.”

During that meeting, Rodriguez alleges Brough said, “‘I have been watching you for a long time and wondering why you weren’t married.’ He even described a dress he had seen me wearing at a previous event. He then went on to tell me that he was ‘on the Elections Committee’ and could help me out if I went home with him.” When Rodriguez told Brough that she was disgusted by his proposition, she says “he sat there and smiled.” Rodriguez said she immediately called her boss to help get her out of the situation, then told various coworkers and elected officials about the incident.

Patricia Wenskunas, founder of the Irvine-based non-profit Crime Survivors, was guest speaker at Monday’s OCGOP Central Committee Meeting. She gave an impassioned defense of Brough’s accusers.

“It is long past time that he is held accountable for his actions and treatment of these women,” Wenskunas said in a statement. “He should resign immediately.”

The Central Committee stopped short of calling for Brough to resign, instead encouraging him not to seek reelection.

Assemblyman Steven Choi, R-Irvine, was one of the only people to speak in defense of Brough, according to a source who was present. Choi didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment sent to his chief of staff.

In August, the Register reported that Brough spent roughly $35,000 in campaign funds over the first six months of the year on travel, hotels, food, clothing and sports tickets. The state announced the next day that it was already investigating an ethics complaint that claims Brough spent roughly $200,000 in campaign funds on personal expenses over the past four years.

Brough issued a brief statement in response stating that he’d been cleared by past audits, though one state audit did lead to a written warning from ethics officials.

In the wake of those reports, the influential conservative group the Lincoln Club of Orange County last week rescinded its previous endorsement of Brough’s 2020 candidacy. And the grassroots group the Orange County Congress of Republicans announced it was endorsing GOP challenger Ed Sachs.

Brough is also facing competition from Republicans Laurie Davies and Melanie Eustice along with Democratic challenger Scott Rhinehart.

Read more about Orange County GOP asks embattled Assemblyman Bill Brough to bow out of 2020 election This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

You need to move the business ASAP. Here’s how a sublease works

Your business expansion will enjoy more space very soon. Now your employees can park at their place of employment vs. down the street. Crisp new offices or tons of manufacturing space await you in the new location. You can’t wait!

You’ve opted to lease the new spot and postpone ownership. You’ll encounter two leasing scenarios once you scour the market for suitable addresses — leases and subleases. So what are the differences? Indulge me while I describe them.

Leases are negotiated directly with the owner of a parcel of commercial real estate. Therefore, they’re referred to as direct leases. Normally, your initial conversations will be through your commercial real estate professional.

The deal you get depends upon the landlord’s motivation, competition in the market and the skill with which your broker volleys. She will work with the owner’s rep to craft your agreement. Outlined will be a monthly payment amount — rent, number of years, term, increases in rent throughout the term, bumps and concessions – free or abated rent, refurbishment, and extra stuff such as tenant improvements.

An early termination right, extension rights through an option to renew, right of first refusal, or right of first offer to purchase may also be included. Once you reach a pact, you and the owner will sign a lease, you’ll deposit the requested amounts and secure insurance. Now your company can live in the new location for the agreed-upon period, let’s assume five years.

But during the lease term, something untoward occurs — a decline in sales, someone acquires your company, you decide to move your manufacturing function to China, or California imposes a huge levy on your product, which dictates a move out-of-state. You find yourself with a glut of space to which you’re committed! Now what?

Well, those circumstances, dear readers create subleases.

A sublease is akin to a remnant sale at your favorite carpet retailer. A full roll of flooring is not available, so you get to pick from what’s left. Because a finite amount remains, little flexibility exists. If the scrap fits your area, great! You benefit. But if you have a larger area to cover, you’re hosed. Also, the smaller the amount of overrun, the fewer takers. Now a price discount must be employed to liquidate. Ouch.

With a sublease, the primary motivation is to stem the bleeding. Excess space wastes rent payments. The thought of providing any concessions runs contrary to a desire to move-on. Consequently, a different dynamic unfolds compared to a direct lease. Plus, another layer of decision-makers will be involved.

Remember, a lease is in place with a landlord and a tenant. Now the tenant becomes a de facto sub-landlord and you are the sub-tenant. All parties — master landlord, sub-landlord, and you — must agree and all must approve.

So with the descriptions of leases and subleases as a backdrop — how should you proceed?

Consider all your alternatives. If you need a ton of abated rent, extensive tenant improvements, or a 10-year term, a direct lease might be your best bet. Conversely, absent these requirements, a sublease can provide you with an adequate solution.

Seek counsel. Leases are complex. Subleases are uber complex. They are not for the squeamish. If your “landlord” stiffs the owner, your sublease is in jeopardy. You’ll need two sets of approvals.

Plan on extended time frames to get all resolved. We recently encountered a sublease that took 90 days to get the nod!

Allen C. Buchanan, SIOR, is a principal with Lee & Associates Commercial Real Estate Services in Orange. He can be reached at abuchanan@lee-associates.com or 714.564.7104.

Powered by WPeMatico

McDonald’s tries to reheat the chicken sandwich wars with spicy barbecue sauce

Two new combatants, McDonald’s and Jack In The Box, have entered the “chicken war” launched by Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen on Aug. 12.

That’s the date when Popeyes debuted a chicken sandwich that became a runaway success. After two weeks of long lines at drive-thrus and social media frenzy, the Miami-based fast food chain announced it had run out of supplies to make the sandwiches and pulled them from its menus.

The battle lines were initially drawn by fans of Popeyes and fans of Chick-fil-A, which has been selling a very similar sandwich for decades. Wendy’s entered the fray because it had a new spicy nuggets promotion.

And now after two weeks of quiet, McDonald’s has come out with a Spicy BBQ Chicken Sandwich.

It has the same essentials as Popeyes’ and Chick-fil-A’s sandwich, a crispy chicken fillet served on a bun with a couple of pickle slices.

McDonald’s sandwich adds some raw onion and a new barbecue glaze. It costs $5.29, more than the $3.99 that Popeyes’ was charging.

Jack In The Box’s Really Big Chicken Sandwich has tomato, mayonnaise and lettuce, making it more like Wendy’s chicken sandwiches. What’s different is that it starts with two chicken patties, and customers can add one or two more if they like. It also includes bacon.

Combos cost $3.99-$5.99.

Popeyes has yet to say when it the sandwich will return. The banner on its website shows an empty sandwich wrapper with the words, “Be right back.”

But on Thursday, Popeyes launched a promotion called BYOB, “Bring Your Own Buns,” encouraging customers to buy three-piece chicken tenders and supply their own bread.

A news release announcing the promotion was accompanied by a short video featuring skeptical-looking actors.

“Seriously,” one of the actors says, “when are you bringing the sandwich back?”

 

Powered by WPeMatico

Here’s how Southern California colleges fared in the 2020 U.S. News rankings

No matter what you’re looking for in a college education, Southern California likely has a good school to suit your needs.

That’s one of the big takeaways from the 2020 U.S. News Best Colleges Rankings, released Monday, Sept. 9.

There were few surprises in the top overall rankings, with Caltech placing highest in the region as the No. 12 best national university.

UCLA and USC weren’t too far behind, at No. 20 and No. 22, respectively.

Orange County was also represented on the list, with UC Irvine placing at No. 36. When narrowed down to just the top public schools, UCI won the No. 9 spot.

Southern California fared even better in the liberal arts category, in which Pomona College ranked fifth and Claremont McKenna College placed seventh.

Despite its high standing, a representative for Pomona College said that shouldn’t be the only factor prospective students consider when choosing a college or university.

“Our focus is on providing a top-notch education that equips students to confront problems from fresh angles and come up with real solutions,” spokesman Mark Kendall said. “There are many viewpoints on the issue of rankings, but bottom line, they should never be treated as an answer, only as one resource among many as students begin their college search.”

U.S. News used factors like graduation rates, class size, expert opinion, faculty resources and the share of first-year students who were in the top 10% of their high school class to determine the rankings.

“We’ve found the best institutions to be ones committed to academically and financially supporting their students through graduation,” Kim Castro, editor and chief content officer of U.S. News, said in a statement. “They draw in high-quality professors and set students up for postgraduate success.”

But U.S. News didn’t stop at quantifying overall quality.

The organization compiled more than a dozen separate lists that rank schools on specific metrics, like value, innovation and ethnic diversity.

Across many of the lists, Caltech stood out. The university ranked No. 3 on the list of schools that offer undergraduates the opportunity to pursue their own creative research projects. It also tied for ninth place on a list of schools with the most economic diversity among students, ranked 10th for lowest debt load upon graduation and placed 11th for overall best value.

In a new list that debuted this year, which measures social mobility by assessing outcomes for students who received Pell grants, Southern California schools dominated the highest rankings.

UC Riverside topped the list, with UCI coming in third and the University of La Verne tying for fourth.

The leader of the winning school on that metric said, for his part, that it’s about time college rankings start taking student outcomes into account.

“UC Riverside is not a newcomer to the social mobility movement,” Chancellor Kim Wilcox said in a statement. “It’s been part of our ethos for a generation and we are heartened that rankings publications are starting to catch up – but they are not there yet.”

The Southland also shined bright on the list of best regional universities in the west.

California Lutheran University placed ninth on that list, followed by Cal Poly Pomona at No. 14, Cal State Fullerton at No. 17 and Cal State Long Beach at No. 20.

Sign up for The Localist, our daily email newsletter with handpicked stories relevant to where you live. Subscribe here.

Read more about Here’s how Southern California colleges fared in the 2020 U.S. News rankings This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

Whicker: A stunning quick-change act for USC, especially on defense

  • USC running back Vavae Malepeai begins his celebration in the end zone after scoring a touchdown against Stanford in the third quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Tyler Vaughns avoids a tackle on his way to the end zone to score a touchdown against Stanford in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Sound
    The gallery will resume inseconds
  • USC wide receiver Tyler Vaughns does a little celebrating in the end zone after scoring a touchdown against Stanford in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Stanford quarterback Davis Mills, left, is sacked by USC linebacker Hunter Echols, center, with the help of defensive lineman Caleb Tremblay, right, in the fourth quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC cornerback Greg Johnson, right, intercepts a pass as
    Stanford intended receiver Colby Parkinson is called for a face mask penalty the fourth quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC cornerback Greg Johnson does a little celebrating after intercepting a pass against Stanford in the fourth quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown, right, celebrates with teammate USC running back Vavae Malepeai after Brown scored a touchdown late in the second quarter against Stanford in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC running back Vavae Malepeai, center, celebrates his touchdown with teammates Drake London, left, and Drew Richmond, right, in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC quarterback Kedon Slovis fires a pass against Stanford in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Devon Williams, right, pushes away Stanford safety Malik Antoine as he runs along the sideline for a big gain in the first quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown, right, beats Stanford cornerback Obi Eboh, center, and another defender to make a touchdown catch in the second quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown, right, celebrates his touchdown with quarterback Kedon Slovis in the second quarter against Stanford in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Munir McClain, left, catches a pass before being hit by Stanford cornerback Paulson Adebo in the first quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown, right, celebrates with wide receiver Drake London after Brown scored a touch down against Stanford late in the second quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown dives into the end zone for a touchdown late in the second quarter against Stanford in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC cornerback Olaijah Griffin (2) steps in front of a Stanford receiver to break up a pass in the end zone in the second quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown, right, celebrates his second quarter touchdown against Stanford with wide receiver Devon Williams, center, in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown, right, celebrates with offensive tackle Jalen McKenzie after scoring a touchdown against Stanford late in the second quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • USC wide receiver Drake London, left, finds an open field after catching a pass to gain big yardage before being brought down by Stanford safety Kendall Williamson, right, in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Stanford running back Cameron Scarlett, left, muscles his way past USC wide receiver Drake London, center, and quarterback Jack Sears, right, to score a touch down in the second quarter in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Southern California quarterback Kedon Slovis (9) runs during the second half of the team’s NCAA college football game against Stanford on Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

  • USC wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown, right, celebrates his second quarter touchdown against Stanford with teammates in Los Angeles on Saturday, September 7, 2019. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)

  • Southern California quarterback Kedon Slovis throws a pass against Stanford during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

of

Expand

LOS ANGELES — Sudden change, they call it. USC fans have been demanding one. On Saturday night they got that change, and some hope too.

Stanford was the bowling ball and the Trojans were the scattering tenpins in the first quarter. On the first play of the second quarter, Cameron Scarlett scored to make it 14-3. On the next play, USC’s Velus Jones coughed up the football on his own 21.

“If they had scored a touchdown there it would have been devastating,” said Trojans coach Clay Helton, who would have been at ground zero of such devastation.

Stanford quarterback Davis Mills, in this position because K.J. Costello was hurt, tried to pick on USC cornerback Olajiah Griffin on first and third down, aiming at Colby Parkinson, the tallest oak from Oaks Christian, both times. Griffin held his ground and both passes were incomplete.

On fourth-and-13, Jet Toner kicked the field goal that created a 17-3 lead. In the stands and in the bars and in the Barcaloungers, the Trojan “faithful” began to search Netflix.

On field level it was different.

“We’re thinking that if we score (a touchdown), it’s a one-score game,” Helton said. “So Graham (offensive coordinator Harrell) kept turning it loose. You don’t have to tell him to do that.”

Kedon Slovis, the freshest toast of this town, then dropped a fly ball in between Stanford defenders and into the hands of Amon-Ra St. Brown, for a 39-yard touchdown. But Stanford got a 44-yard run from Scarlett and camped out, first-and-10 on the USC 17. There were penalties on consecutive plays, some pushes and shoves and points and counterpoints, and even though Stanford got another field goal and a 20-10 lead, something changed. Actually, everything did.

USC rampaged to a 45-20 win, easily its best game since a Pac-12 championship game win over Stanford in 2017, and maybe well before that. Those were the most points Stanford has given up in five years (to Oregon). Frustrations were purged; visions came true. As receiver Tyler Vaughns said, “People don’t understand. This is nothing like last year. New players, new coaches.”

And even though the new quarterback was directing the band afterward, a privilege that comes with completing 28 of 33 passes for 377 yards, three touchdowns and no interceptions, it usually takes the whole village when you outscore someone 42-6 in three quarters.

Slovis was phenomenal, no question. You can take your pick of passes. The best was probably a 31-yarder that whizzed over the helmet of cornerback Obi Ebon and found the hands of Michael Pittman, just before Vavae Malepeai ran to make it 31-20.

“There’s really a huge margin for error when you throw it to these guys,” Slovis said.

“I was proud of him,” center Brett Neilon said. “We had his back.”

“I told him he didn’t have to be Superman,” Helton said, then turned to St. Brown. “I told HIM that he did.”

Meanwhile, there was the worrisome secondary, with four sophomores and a freshman. The way to gain confidence at this position is not to spend your August practice afternoons lined up against Pittman, St. Brown, Vaughns and the deep layers of USC receivers. Against Fresno State they struggled and survived. Against Stanford they made a difference, although Mills somehow kept missing his big receivers and, in the end, was under siege from the pass rush.

“We were concerned about their screens,” said Chad Kahua’aha’a, the defensive line coach. “Finally we just said, let’s just go after them, run some games up front, and see what happens.”

“Holding them to that field goal was big,” linebacker Christian Rector said.

Stanford had only one touchdown drive longer than 35 yards, which was the first one, set up by Connor Wedington’s 60-yard kickoff return. The Cardinal had no points and only 119 yards in the second half, and Toner missed two field goals.

Griffin, who is coming back from simultaneous rehabs on both shoulders, survived a lot of business from the Cardinal, and Greg Johnson picked off Mills’ pass to Parkinson, setting up the score that made it 38-20.

Johnson went to Hawkins High, not too far away on West 60th Street. He remembered Parkinson from competing with him at the Army All-American Bowl.

“We knew he was one of our top targets, so I just played my technique,” Johnson said. “I’ve got to give a big shout-out to our receivers, too. Every day in practice, we get tested by them. You have to be on your toes no matter what. We’ve got a young corps, so we have to lean on each other.”

And at halftime, just after Slovis had found St. Brown to put the Trojans up 24-20?

“We knew we had ’em,” he said.

The same belief was slow to reach the seating areas, but those who waited for Slovis to buckle are still waiting. Whether Helton will be forgiven — or will be recognized — for moving Slovis ahead of Jack Sears on the depth chart is not known. It is a little difficult to expect anyone’s preconceptions to survive, after that.

“What’s next?” Malepeai repeated. “Just go back in on Monday and lock in and get better. I don’t like to think about last year, but we’ve been shooting ourselves in the foot. We did it in the beginning tonight. If we quit doing that, I think we could score just about every time. I don’t see a ceiling.”

But, for the first time in a long time, he saw some gold.

Read more about Whicker: A stunning quick-change act for USC, especially on defense This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed. SaddleBack Valley Shredding Service

Powered by WPeMatico

Robert Mugabe, longtime Zimbabwe leader, dies at 95

By Farai Mutsaka and Christopher Torchia, The Associated Press

Harare, Zimbabwe — Robert Mugabe, the former leader of Zimbabwe forced to resign in 2017 after a 37-year rule whose early promise was eroded by economic turmoil, disputed elections and human rights violations, has died. He was 95.

His successor President Emmerson Mnangagwa confirmed Mugabe’s death in a tweet Friday, mourning him as an “icon of liberation.” He did not provide details.

Mugabe, who took power after white minority rule ended in 1980, blamed Zimbabwe’s economic problems on international sanctions and once said he wanted to rule for life. But growing discontent about the southern African country’s fractured leadership and other problems prompted a military intervention, impeachment proceedings by the parliament and large street demonstrations for his removal.

  • FILE – In this Tuesday, March 18, 2008 file photo, Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe addresses party supporters at a rally in Gweru, about 250 kms. (155 miles) south of Harare. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Robert Mugabe, age 95, has died. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, file)

  • FILE – In this Wednesday, Nov. 10, 1976 file photo, leaders of the Black National Front Joshua Nkomo, left, and Robert Mugabe make a no progress statement after their informal meeting with British chairman Ivor Richard at the Palais of Nations, Geneva, Switzerland. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Mugabe, age 95, has died. (AP Photo/Dieter Endlicher, file)

  • Sound
    The gallery will resume inseconds
  • FILE – In this Sunday, July, 29, 2018, file photo, Former Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe, left, and his wife Grace pose for a photo after a press conference at their residence in Harare. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Robert Mugabe, age 95, has died. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)

  • FILE – In this Saturday, Oct. 31, 2009, file photo Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe arrives for the burial of a prominent member of his party, Misheck Chando, in Harare. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Robert Mugabe, age 95, has died. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)

  • FILE – In this Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 file photo Zimbabwe’s President Robert Mugabe, center, arrives to preside over a student graduation ceremony at Zimbabwe Open University on the outskirts of Harare, Zimbabwe. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Robert Mugabe, age 95, has died. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

  • FILE – In this Wednesday, April 18, 2012 file photo Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe, lights a flame at celebrations to mark 32 years of independence of Zimbabwe, in Harare. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Mugabe, age 95, has died. (AP Photo/File)

  • FILE – In this Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 file photo Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe clenches his fists as he delivers his speech at his party’s 13th annual conference, in Gweru about 250 Kilometres south west of the capital Harare. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Mugabe, age 95, has died. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)

  • FILE – In this Wednesday, May 22, 2013 file photo Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe, left, shakes hands with Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai after he signed the new constitution into law at State house in Harare. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Robert Mugabe, age 95, has died. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)

  • FILE – In this Saturday, Dec, 17, 2016 file photo, Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe addresses people at an event before the closure of his party’s 16th Annual Peoples Conference in Masvingo, south of the capital Harare. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Mugabe, age 95, has died. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)

  • FILE – In this Oct. 3, 2017 file photo, Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe during a meeting with South African President Jacob Zuma at the Presidential Guesthouse in Pretoria, South Africa. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Robert Mugabe, age 95, has died.
    (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe, FILE)

  • FILE — In this Friday, Nov. 17, 2017 file photo, Zimbabwe’s President Robert Mugabe officiates at a student graduation ceremony at Zimbabwe Open University on the outskirts of Harare, Zimbabwe. On Friday, Sept. 6, 2019, Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said his predecessor Robert Mugabe, age 95, has died. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

of

Expand

The announcement of Mugabe’s Nov. 21, 2017 resignation after he initially ignored escalating calls to quit triggered wild celebrations in the streets of the capital, Harare. Well into the night, cars honked and people danced and sang in a spectacle of free expression that would have been impossible during his years in power and reflected hopes for a better future.

On Feb. 21, 2018, Mugabe marked his first birthday since his resignation in near solitude, far from the lavish affair of past years. While the government that removed him with military assistance had declared his birthday as a national holiday, his successor and former deputy Mnangagwa did not mention him in a televised speech on the day.

Mugabe’s decline in his last years as president was partly linked to the political ambitions of his wife, Grace, a brash, divisive figure whose ruling party faction eventually lost out in a power struggle with supporters of Mnangagwa, who was close to the military.

Despite Zimbabwe’s decline during his rule, Mugabe remained defiant, railing against the West for what he called its neo-colonialist attitude and urging Africans to take control of their resources, a populist message that was often a hit even as many nations on the continent shed the strongman model and moved toward democracy.

Mugabe enjoyed acceptance among peers in Africa who chose not to judge him in the same way as Britain, the United States and other Western detractors. Toward the end of his rule, he served as rotating chairman of the 54-nation African Union and the 15-nation Southern African Development Community; his criticism of the International Criminal Court was welcomed by regional leaders who also thought it was being unfairly used to target Africans.

“They are the ones who say they gave Christianity to Africa,” Mugabe said of the West during a visit to South Africa. “We say: ‘We came, we saw and we were conquered.’”

Spry in his impeccably tailored suits, Mugabe as leader maintained a schedule of events and international travel that defied his advancing age, though signs of weariness mounted toward the end. He fell after stepping off a plane in Zimbabwe, read the wrong speech at the opening of parliament and appeared to be dozing during a news conference in Japan. However, his longevity and frequently dashed rumors of ill health delighted supporters and infuriated opponents who had sardonically predicted he would live forever.

“Do you want me to punch you to the floor to realize I am still there?” Mugabe told an interviewer from state television who asked him in early 2016 about retirement plans.

After independence, Mugabe reached out to whites after a long war between black guerrillas and the white rulers of Rhodesia, as Zimbabwe was known. He stressed education and built new schools. Tourism and mining flourished and Zimbabwe was a regional breadbasket.

However, a brutal military campaign waged against an uprising in western Matabeleland province that ended in 1987 augured a bitter turn in Zimbabwe’s fortunes. As the years went by, Mugabe was widely accused of hanging onto power through violence and vote fraud, notably in a 2008 election that led to a troubled coalition government after regional mediators intervened.

“I have many degrees in violence,” Mugabe once boasted on a campaign trail, raising his fist. “You see this fist, it can smash your face.”

Mugabe was re-elected in 2013 in another election marred by alleged irregularities, though he dismissed his critics as sore losers.

Amid the political turmoil, the economy of Zimbabwe, traditionally rich in agriculture and minerals, was deteriorating. Factories were closing, unemployment was rising and the country abandoned its currency for the US dollar in 2009 because of hyperinflation.

The economic problems are often traced to the violent seizures of thousands of white-owned farms that began around 2000. Land reform was supposed to take much of the country’s most fertile land — owned by about 4,500 white descendants of mainly British and South African colonial-era settlers — and redistribute it to poor blacks. Instead, Mugabe gave prime farms to ruling party leaders, party loyalists, security chiefs, relatives and cronies.

Mugabe was born in Zvimba, 60 kilometers (40 miles) west of the capital of Harare. As a child, he tended his grandfather’s cattle and goats, fished for bream in muddy water holes, played football and “boxed a lot,” as he recalled later.

Mugabe lacked the easy charisma of Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid leader and contemporary who became South Africa’s first black president in 1994 after reconciling with its former white rulers. But he drew admirers in some quarters for taking a hard line with the West, and he could be disarming despite his sometimes harsh demeanor.

“The gift of politicians is never to stop speaking until the people say, ‘Ah, we are tired,’” he said at a 2015 news conference. “You are now tired. I say thank you.”

Torchia reported from Johannesburg.

Read more about Robert Mugabe, longtime Zimbabwe leader, dies at 95 This post was shared via Orange County Register’s RSS Feed

Powered by WPeMatico

Man suspected of slashing ex-girlfriend’s face in Santa Ana

SANTA ANA — Santa Ana police asked for the public’s help Wednesday, Sept. 4, in tracking down a man accused of slashing the face of his ex-girlfriend.

Alexander Chicas, 44, allegedly broke into the victim’s home at about 1:50 a.m. Monday, according to Santa Ana police Cpl. Anthony Bertagna.


Police sought Alexander Chicas, 44, on suspicion of breaking into his ex-girlfriend’s residence in Santa Ana and slashing her face with a knife on Monday, Sept. 2 (Photo courtesy of the Santa Ana Police Department)

The woman had her bedroom window open because of the heat, “so he ripped the screen off and forced his way in and told her he would kill her” before he slashed her face with a knife, Bertagna alleged.

The victim’s screams drew the attention of her teenage son, which prompted the intruder to flee, according to Bertagna.

The estranged couple had been together “for many years” and had recently broke up, he said.

“He had assaulted her previously so she dumped him,” Bertagna said.

Chicas is 5-foot-8 and 190 pounds, with brown hair and eyes. He was seen fleeing in a white 2015 Toyota Tacoma bearing license plate number 60192H1. He rents a room in the area of Bristol Street and McFadden Avenue, Bertagna said.


Police sought Alexander Chicas, 44, on suspicion of breaking into his ex-girlfriend’s residence in Santa Ana and slashing her face with a knife on Monday, Sept. 2 He was last seen driving a white Toyota Tacoma bearing plate number 60192H1 (Photo courtesy of the Santa Ana Police Department).

Anyone who knows his whereabouts was asked to call detectives at 714-245-8660 or send an email to apartida@santa-ana.org.

Powered by WPeMatico